Friday, January 11th 2013

BenQ Introduces New RL2455HM Gaming Monitor With Blazing-Fast Response Time

BenQ America Corp., an internationally renowned provider of digital lifestyle innovations, today announced the expansion of its RL Series of professional gaming monitors with the launch of the new RL2455HM.

Built on the advanced technology of the RL2450HT - featured on the Major League Gaming (MLG) 2012 championship circuit - the RL2455HM has been enhanced thanks to feedback directly from the gaming community. Gamers now get a blazing-fast 1-ms GTG response time, 2-watt stereo speakers, and dual HDMI ports for the ultimate in connectivity and control. The monitor also comes packed with advanced custom settings, such as BenQ's Black eQualizer, Display Mode, and Smart Scaling to give players an edge over their opponents.


"As the official MLG gaming monitor sponsor, players relied on our RL2450HT to deliver unprecedented levels of accuracy and control in a number of tournaments across the U.S.," said Bob Wudeck, Director of Retail and e-Commerce at BenQ America Corp. "With the RL2455HM, we've taken all the advanced technologies of the RL2450HT, incorporated feedback from MLG pros, and created a powerful gaming monitor. Now home gamers can get the same experience as the pros, enabling an entirely new level of player performance."

Designed specifically for console gaming, users get the ultimate experience for fast-paced first-person shooter (FPS) games such as the new Halo 4 and Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, and popular fighting games like Mortal Kombat with an ultra-low input lag that renders action without ghosting or latency from mouse motion. The monitor's dual HDMI ports provide full HD connectivity with PCs, cameras, Blu-ray players, and more, allowing users to enjoy their digital A/V entertainment effortlessly. The RL2455HM also features a 60 Hz refresh rate tuned to match console video output for seamless connectivity, a 24-inch widescreen (16:9) full HD LED screen, LED backlighting for great color and low power consumption, and a 12 million to 1 contrast ratio for the best in picture quality.

To give players a competitive edge, the RL2455HM features BenQ's Black eQualizer to enable total visibility by allowing gamers to adjust the screen brightness without over-exposing white levels - revealing critical combat details with improved visibility in darkened areas. To accommodate individual viewing preferences, a Display Mode allows gamers to switch between seven monitor screen sizes while the Smart Scaling feature gives players the ability to scale the screen on-the-fly to virtually any custom size - ranging from a 24-inch 1080p display to a traditional 17-inch 4:3 format — without impacting controller sensitivity. The monitor provides custom settings for color enhancement, and features 2-watt internal stereo speakers.

The new RL2455HM gaming monitor will be available in March 2013 at an MSRP of $229. Information on the full line of BenQ gaming monitors is available at gaming.benq.com.
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29 Comments on BenQ Introduces New RL2455HM Gaming Monitor With Blazing-Fast Response Time

#1
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Katanai
Dude ffs! Why do you think Intel said that overclocking voids your warranty? Exactly because it shortens the lifespan of your CPU!!! A CPU is designed to work between certain limits. Guess what TurboBoost is now? It overclocks your CPU for a certain amount of time because of thermal concerns and because of this. Your monitor is designed to work exactly like that. For certain amounts of time. No matter how much you play a game you won't be playing it 24/7. What's so hard to understand? I am not saying your monitor will blow up because of this I am saying it will break faster because of it...

But whatever. Everything you say on TPU must and will be turned into a long argument it seems, in which you will be attacked for expressing an opinion. Especially if you're trying to help out...
You both have points though. Can electronics run fast? Oh yes. Will they degrade faster? Probably yes, but that varies from chip to chip.
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#2
Prima.Vera
by: qubit

Thing is, the strobing effect of LB is also great for the desktop, since it elminates motion blur when moving windows around, or watching video, too. There's no flicker or eyestrain either, because it's flashing at 120Hz. Hence, I leave LB on the whole time now.
Is it me or LCD's don't flicker?!? For the love of God 60Hz on CRT is NOT the same this as 60Hz on LCDs....
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#3
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: Katanai
Dude ffs! Why do you think Intel said that overclocking voids your warranty? Exactly because it shortens the lifespan of your CPU!!! A CPU is designed to work between certain limits. Guess what TurboBoost is now? It overclocks your CPU for a certain amount of time because of thermal concerns and because of this. Your monitor is designed to work exactly like that. For certain amounts of time. No matter how much you play a game you won't be playing it 24/7. What's so hard to understand? I am not saying your monitor will blow up because of this I am saying it will break faster because of it...

But whatever. Everything you say on TPU must and will be turned into a long argument it seems, in which you will be attacked for expressing an opinion. Especially if you're trying to help out...
This keeps rolling on because you keep bringing up new strawmen arguments. Anyway, here goes:

- Overclocking is not the same as running a component at stock. You're running it faster than designed to for greater performance, so will therefore wear it out faster. No one here is suggesting that you run the monitor out of spec to get more performance out of it. LB is a stock feature which is designed to run 24/7, see below.

- The nvidia driver has the standard option to run the monitor 24/7 like this. It's called "Always run in 3D mode". nvidia wouldn't allow this if it was asking the monitor to do anything it wasn't designed for that shortened its life.

I hope that clears this up for you?

by: Prima.Vera
Is it me or LCD's don't flicker?!? For the love of God 60Hz on CRT is NOT the same this as 60Hz on LCDs....
Indeed it's not. Nowhere near.

However, all LCD monitors do actually flicker! They oscillate the pixels to avoid them wearing out quickly. However, the way the pixels are phased prevents any visible flicker from being seen. Video test programs can show up this oscillation by putting out patterns that will flicker. Because different monitors implement this differently, different patterns are required to show this. I did it once on my monitor ages ago and it was quite freaky!

EDIT: LightBoost makes an LCD monitor flicker in a very similar way to a CRT since the backlight is strobed. It's the shear speed of 120Hz that stops this being a problem and hence no eyestrain. If it was strobing at just 60Hz, then you would see that flicker and get eyestrain from it.
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