Thursday, January 24th 2013

Handheld Launches New Version of its Algiz XRW Ultra-Rugged Notebook

Handheld Group, a fast-growing manufacturer of rugged mobile computers, PDAs and smartphones, today announced the launch of the new version of its highly popular Algiz XRW rugged notebook. The updated Algiz XRW is considerably faster than its predecessor, and has twice the amount of RAM.

The new Algiz XRW is a slim, lightweight, compact and fully rugged notebook that delivers unprecedented performance in the field. Its 10.1-inch touchscreen display features MaxView technology, providing spectacular screen clarity and brightness in any outdoor condition, even direct sunlight. The Algiz XRW is one of the lightest and most compact rugged notebooks on the market, weighing in at a mere 1.6 kilograms, or 3.5 pounds.

New Algiz XRW features include:
  • A fast and powerful N2600 1.6 GHz Dual-Core Intel Atom processor.
  • A larger 128 GB solid-state disk.
  • Twice the memory, with 4 GB of DDR2 RAM.
  • Newly optimized integrated u-blox GPS for better field performance.
  • Added data security with TPM chipset
  • Improved wireless WAN with the optional Gobi 3000 technology.
"The new version of Algiz XRW is considerably faster and better-performing than earlier versions," said Johan Hed, product manager at Handheld Group. "The new ATOM processor is very impressive — it's powerful and almost twice as fast as its predecessors, yet energy-efficient with long battery life. In addition, we have increased the cache and RAM memory, improved the graphics capabilities, and we have optimized GPS performance to make the Algiz XRW the best in its class of mobile computing tools."

The full-featured and lightweight Algiz XRW offers an array of mobile capabilities. It comes standard with Bluetooth, WLAN and GPS — features many other products add on as extras — as well as a built-in 2-megapixel autofocus camera that allows video conferencing in the field.

Its keyboard and mouse touchpad are fully sealed and illuminated by two LED lights, and it carries an IP65 rating for protection against sand, dust and water. It passes MIL-STD-810G ruggedness testing, including drop tests from 1.2 meters, and can handle extreme temperatures from -20 C to 55 C.

The new Algiz XRW has a powerful N2600 1.6 GHz Dual-Core Intel ATOM processor, and it includes a 128 GB solid-state disk and 4 GB of RAM. It runs the Microsoft Windows 7 operating system just like any PC in an office, and is ready for Windows 8.

An optional 3G modem provides high-speed GSM/UMTS/EVDO data transmission. The Algiz XRW is ready for Gobi 3000 technology, which means it's possible to work on any choice of wireless frequency anywhere in the world. The 57.6 Wh battery works up to eight hours on a single charge.

Like the rest of Handheld's lineup of rugged PDAs, smartphones and mobile computers, Algiz XRW is specifically developed for use in tough environments in industries such as mining, geomatics, logistics, forestry, public transportation, construction, utilities, maintenance, military and security.

The new Algiz XRW is available for order immediately, with shipments starting at the end of February 2013. The price point remains unchanged.
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4 Comments on Handheld Launches New Version of its Algiz XRW Ultra-Rugged Notebook

#1
theJesus
10.1" screen and an Atom? Shouldn't this be classified as a netbook instead of a notebook?
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#2
lemonadesoda
I'm actually surprised these things still exist. I'm surprised that "rugged" hasn't gone the tablet route.
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#3
wowman
I lold @ A fast and powerful N2600 1.6 GHz Dual-Core Intel Atom processor.

that spec is trolling.
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#4
NC37
Panasonic still makes a rugged laptop line. All of those environments listed are ones most normal laptops can't exist easily in. Tablets are possible but the screens would be a mess. Advantage of a laptop is the screen is protected while not in use. Theres also aspect of software. Can these industries get the type of software they need in a tablet OS environment? Sure they can but why spend money making it when you can keep using one that works in Windows. If it isn't broke, don't fix it. Part of the reason XP lasted so long.
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