Monday, February 25th 2013

AMD Launches the FirePro R5000 Remote Graphics Card for Deployment in Data Centers

AMD today announced the arrival of the AMD FirePro R5000 remote graphics card, a flexible, manageable solution designed and engineered to power remote 3D-graphics workflows and full computing experiences over IP networks. The energy-, space- and cost-efficient AMD FirePro R5000 is the ideal solution for IT managers operating in data center environments where limited space, power budgets and cooling costs pose a constant challenge.

The AMD FirePro R5000 combines AMD's Graphics Core Next (GCN) Architecture with Teradici's PCoIP technology, and delivers a 3D experience with low latency transmission -- ideal for mid-range multimonitor endpoints such as those used by CAD, medical imaging and financial services professionals. The AMD FirePro R5000 also complements IT security protocols by safeguarding corporate IP, since critical information never leaves the data center.


"IT professionals are looking for a secure and straight forward cloud-based graphics solution that delivers core functionality capable of adapting to meet each employee's unique graphics needs," said David Cummings, senior director and general manager of AMD Professional Graphics. "The AMD FirePro R5000 meets these needs, delivering the flexibility, functionality, security and industry-leading graphics capabilities companies look for when deciding on a remote graphics solution."

AMD FirePro R5000 Remote Graphics Features and Benefits

Low Power Solution: Maximum power consumption of 150W helps to minimize power costs and enables the use of small footprint low power client devices that are capable of supporting up to four displays remotely;
Effective Cooling: Minimizes system heat and fan noise in employee work areas, helps to reduce cooling costs and create cooler, quieter workspaces while a variable speed fan adjusts to accelerate the exchange of air heated by server components for cooler ambient air;
Scale and Simplicity: Centrally located in the data center, IT can accommodate flexible seating arrangements or provide employees with zero clients, ultimately helping IT get employees up and running more quickly;
Flexibility of Deployment: Delivers the deployment flexibility IT needs, including the option to deploy in desktop workstations, rack and blade servers, and PCIe expansion chassis;
Power Management: AMD PowerTune and AMD ZeroCore Power intelligent power management and monitoring tools enable IT managers to effectively track and contain power usage;
High Performance Remote Protocol: The next generation Teradici TERA2240 host processor is able to transmit up to 300 megapixels per second and drive up to four displays per end user, with refresh rates up to 60 frames per second giving what Teradici describes as "the best remote user experience possible."

"With the introduction of the AMD FirePro R5000 with Teradici PCoIP processor, IT departments now have powerful centralized computing solutions that are easy to manage, and deliver the graphics performance required to handle high resolution images, video and 3D models with ease," said Trent Punnett, vice president of Product Management, System Engineering and Corporate Development at Teradici. "In addition, the AMD FirePro R5000 can be brokered and managed by VMware View giving a common broker and management window across both workstation and VDI desktops, and works with PCoIP zero clients that are offered by an ecosystem of over 30 OEMs."

The AMD FirePro R5000 is rigorously tested by AMD to ensure readiness for demanding professional use. It is a durable remote graphics solution intended to increase asset utilization density, meet real-world workloads and ultimately help IT minimize operating costs and time spent on servicing individual systems.

"Tasked with finding a thin client solution capable accelerating real-time 2D and basic 3D graphics for game development and computer animation classes, we turned to AMD's first generation remote graphics product, the ATI FirePro RG220," said Mahesh Neelakanta, director of the Technical Services Group, Florida Atlantic University. "Not only were we able to conserve energy and save time on system maintenance, the graphics cards were able to handle video, 2D images and animations, and 3D elements without bogging down the system or noticeable pixelation. Offering a more powerful GPU, four times the memory and nearly eight times the memory bandwidth of the RG220, the R5000 will allow us to deploy remote systems for our more advanced classes and configure multimonitor set ups our students will eventually encounter in the workplace."

Backed by a three-year warranty and planned three-year minimum lifecycle, the AMD FirePro R5000 will be available from select retailers and channel partners.
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30 Comments on AMD Launches the FirePro R5000 Remote Graphics Card for Deployment in Data Centers

#2
Prima.Vera
Guys, when can we expect a review and a comparison test with nVidia's Quadro? Cheers?
Posted on Reply
#3
erocker
by: Prima.Vera
Guys, when can we expect a review and a comparison test with nVidia's Quadro? Cheers?
How would you expect a review? I've never seen a workstation/professional GPU review on TPU.
Posted on Reply
#5
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Prima.Vera
Hmm?? Why not??
...because the cards cost several times more than consumer cards and the market for them is small? 99.9% of the people at TPU probably will never need one. That's not how you properly target articles to your audience.
Posted on Reply
#6
HossHuge
by: Aquinus
99.9% of the people at TPU probably will never need one. That's not how you properly target articles to your audience.
Then why give news about it?
Posted on Reply
#7
Prima.Vera
by: Aquinus
...because the cards cost several times more than consumer cards and the market for them is small? 99.9% of the people at TPU probably will never need one. That's not how you properly target articles to your audience.
That's the most bollocks comment I've read in years.

I actually pretty need some for our office, since our old Quadros from 2004 are getting old. Always so hard to find a quality review of those type of cards...:ohwell:

P.S. Market is small?? LOL:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#8
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Prima.Vera
That's the most bollocks comment I've read in years.

I actually pretty need some for our office, since our old Quadros from 2004 are getting old. Always so hard to find a quality review of those type of cards...:ohwell:

P.S. Market is small?? LOL:laugh:
Oh look one person. Are you more than 1% of the tpu readers?

It would be neat if wiz reviewed these things too, but that would completely change the scope of the site. So i'm guessing it will not happen anytime soon.

BTW, doesnt Anandtech review these things from time to time? They do workstations.
Posted on Reply
#9
Prima.Vera
by: Frick

It would be neat if wiz reviewed these things too, but that would completely change the scope of the site.
What scope is that?, I'm not clear...
Posted on Reply
#10
Fourstaff
This will need a completely new set of benchmarks compared to just games in order to test it, something I think will take quite a long time to build up.
Posted on Reply
#11
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: HossHuge
Then why give news about it?
News doesn't cost (much) money, therefore you're not at a (large) loss. You have to acquire the video card to review it and I'm willing to bet that AMD is a little less forth coming when it comes to giving up these cards for free and I'm sure W1zz doesn't want to invest in the money to buy these cards retail.
Posted on Reply
#12
repman244
by: Frick
Oh look one person. Are you more than 1% of the tpu readers?
I would be interested also.

And you can't just say that no one would bother looking with such reviews on TPU...currently that's the case but it's because there are no reviews.

A real indication would be to make a review and see how much traffic it generates. There are a lot of people who aren't registered here but still come to check the reviews.
Posted on Reply
#13
Jizzler
While interested, this particular card represents a much larger review than a handful of benchmarks. People will want metrics on high-end configurations (remote 1920x1200 x 4), comparison to the previous product (dual RG220), competing solutions (Quadro+Tera2 Host), etc.
Posted on Reply
#14
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Jizzler
While interested, this particular card represents a much larger review than a handful of benchmarks. People will want metrics on high-end configurations (remote 1920x1200 x 4), comparison to the previous product (dual RG220), competing solutions (Quadro+Tera2 Host), etc.
+1: Yup yup, which in turns means it will be a more expensive review and if it doesn't generate more traffic than your typical review then it's a waste of money from a financial standpoint.

Edit: Does anyone know how that RJ-45 port on this card works? It doesn't just show up as a network adapter, does it?
Posted on Reply
#15
niko084
by: Prima.Vera
That's the most bollocks comment I've read in years.

I actually pretty need some for our office, since our old Quadros from 2004 are getting old. Always so hard to find a quality review of those type of cards...:ohwell:

P.S. Market is small?? LOL:laugh:
The market is small comparatively speaking and especially around here.

Onto another point, what Quadro's are you currently running and for what software?
What kinda design work?

I build 3-5 CAD workstations a month and have been for years.
Shoot me a PM and I'll be more than willing to help you with a decision.

Slick card, I've been waiting for something like this for some time now, however for a different purpose. :toast:
Posted on Reply
#16
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
yeah. my next card is probably going to be a workstation card too.
Posted on Reply
#17
TheMailMan78
Big Member
by: de.das.dude
yeah. my next card is probably going to be a workstation card too.
Why?

by: Prima.Vera
What scope is that?, I'm not clear...
The market is VERY small man. I see a lot of people even on TPU (which you would think people here would know better) suggesting a Fire or a Quadros for Photoshop work. I doubt half the people that buy these things even NEED one. Its a nitch market of a nitch market.
Posted on Reply
#18
brandonwh64
Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!
by: TheMailMan78
Why?
I almost posted the same thing but thought I wouldn't but yea... why? Most projects done by small scale can be used on a gaming card.
Posted on Reply
#19
Casecutter
Weird only 3% of TPU readers, would pay $1000 for a Titian, but they delivered one here for W1zzard, and then probably 15-20 more to other review sites.

Some of logic folk used above works if it is for gaming and "recreation" all smart a well, but for accomplishing "real work" that pays the bills and keeps ones business overhead down, trying to figure out the best BfB you might purchase has no merit? :confused:

It's not that big of market.... right! I’d say it bigger than Top End enthusiast graphics. It’s not how big the market, it’s that most IT people buy computers for their company and if they need work stations they go from what they had previously and feel comfortable. While the Designers and Engineers using them don’t get a say in what they’d like the company to procure. They get an Email saying they're switching out your machine and you’re just happy their taking that 10 year box away... anything will be better. ;)
Posted on Reply
#20
[502]
Even if you all were assuming the market for these type of cards is small, AMD thinks that wasn't the case. I mean, if AMD willing to invest in such a thing as remote card, then I'm sure the market is big enough for AMD. And, cmiiw, workstation graphic cards are where the most of profit for nvidia/amd comes from.
Posted on Reply
#21
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: [502]
Even if you all were assuming the market for these type of cards is small, AMD thinks that wasn't the case. I mean, if AMD willing to invest in such a thing as remote card, then I'm sure the market is big enough for AMD. And, cmiiw, workstation graphic cards are where the most of profit for nvidia/amd comes from.
I don't know about AMD but it's something like 25% of nVidia's revenue, which is a good chunk but not most of their income.
Posted on Reply
#22
TRWOV
by: Prima.Vera
That's the most bollocks comment I've read in years.

I actually pretty need some for our office, since our old Quadros from 2004 are getting old. Always so hard to find a quality review of those type of cards...:ohwell:

P.S. Market is small?? LOL:laugh:
Anand and Tom's cover professional hardware. TPU is more consumer oriented AFAICT.
Posted on Reply
#23
Prima.Vera
by: niko084

Onto another point, what Quadro's are you currently running and for what software?
What kinda design work?
We run some CATIA V5, Inventor and SolidWorks workstation, 6 in total, all of them with some ancient Quadro FX 3400/4400 cards. Everything is smooth, but only when doing big assembly manipulations, we get some slowdowns. SolidWorks is the worst. Real time rendering is smooth as silk tho..
Posted on Reply
#24
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
by: TheMailMan78
Why?



The market is VERY small man. I see a lot of people even on TPU (which you would think people here would know better) suggesting a Fire or a Quadros for Photoshop work. I doubt half the people that buy these things even NEED one. Its a nitch market of a nitch market.
after finishing my bachelors in mech engg, i hope to do something related to designing.
Posted on Reply
#25
TheMailMan78
Big Member
by: de.das.dude
after finishing my bachelors in mech engg, i hope to do something related to designing.
Don't bother. A college degree doesn't make you an artist man. The fact you are getting a degree in mechanical engineering means you don't have the dedication to follow through as a professional artist.

That's not meant as an insult but doing this stuff isn't a matter of buying the software and BOOM your an artist. It takes YEARS of bloody knuckles and pain to "make it" in the industry. By making it I mean paying your bills on time. :laugh: STAY AWAY MAN. Their is a whole slew of people who are HIGHLY talented who will eat your lunch.

Get good in math and forget anything in "design".
Posted on Reply
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