Friday, March 1st 2013

Aqua Computer Intros Kryographics Full-Coverage Water Block for GeForce GTX Titan

To efficiently cool down the GeForce GTX TITAN graphics card, Aqua Computer offers the new Kryographics series full cover blocks. Other than the old aquagrafx series the new blocks feature wider openings at the side of the copper base and a revised connection terminal to optimize the flow rate.

The 10 mm thick copper base covers the GPU, RAM and voltage regulators. All surfaces with contact to the card are highly polised to 1/1000mm. The top is made of stainless steel and comes with a laser engraved logo. Above the GPU the block uses a 0.25mm micro structure which results in a delta of 10°C between the GPU and water in our internal tests with Furmark. Due to the precise CNC production process the RAM chips can be used with thermal grease which offers a much better heat transfer over thermal pads.

The block will be available in four different variants: copper or nickel plated copper with a stainless steel top, and both blocks also with a Plexiglas top surrounded by a stainless steel frame.

The Kryographics GTX TITAN with copper base ans stainless steel top is in production right now and will be available within the week. Orders are already possible, the block costs 89,90 Euro (incl. 19% VAT). The other three variants will be available by mid March, prices are to be announced.
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8 Comments on Aqua Computer Intros Kryographics Full-Coverage Water Block for GeForce GTX Titan

#1
xvi
What happened to Titan's power/thermal limits and the general "You can't really overvolt/overclock these much at all even if you have awesome cooling"?

I understand water cooling would be helpful if you have, say, more than one of them pressed right against each other, but other than that, what exactly does this do? Just make it quiet?
Posted on Reply
#2
Per Hansson
Awsome looking block!

xvi: Well the (limited) overclocking potential of the Titan is based on temperature, so it will clock higher if on water, especially when loaded hard.
Weather that extra 1% is worth it or not I guess can be explained by the pricetag of the Titan itself ;)
Posted on Reply
#3
Razorfang
Titan OCs pretty well

by: Per Hansson
Awsome looking block!

xvi: Well the (limited) overclocking potential of the Titan is based on temperature, so it will clock higher if on water, especially when loaded hard.
Weather that extra 1% is worth it or not I guess can be explained by the pricetag of the Titan itself ;)
Per Hansson is correct and I'd like to add that the GTX Titan overclocks pretty well using the fan/heatsink combo it came with.

Here is a video showing off the Titan's overclocking capabilities: Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan Benchmarks: Real-World Ga...
Posted on Reply
#6
jihadjoe
by: xvi
What happened to Titan's power/thermal limits and the general "You can't really overvolt/overclock these much at all even if you have awesome cooling"?

I understand water cooling would be helpful if you have, say, more than one of them pressed right against each other, but other than that, what exactly does this do? Just make it quiet?
Since GPU boost 2.0 uses temperature, making the card cooler means it will clock up higher, and/or maintain that higher clock for longer.
This dude from oc.net has his Titan stable at 1200MHz core, and mostly because his temps stay low throughout.
Posted on Reply
#7
BababooeyHTJ
Actually when your gpu vrms and memory run cooler they draw a little less juice. So it should also help keep TDP down.

I know in the past with bigger gpus that they would clock better at lower temps. The GTX280 for example would clock better if you could keep it cool. Thats back before software voltage control.

I know that I my GTX280 could hit 750mhz. That wouldn't have happened on the stock cooler.
Posted on Reply
#8
Flibolito
+1 I agree from my experiences. I will jump on a hydro-copper version of the Titan as soon as they become available. My 480 HC has done so well the last 3 years, if I am going to spend $1000 whats another 200 or so to keep it cool and get get a sick stable overclock out of it.
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