Monday, March 18th 2013

Intel Core i7-4770K "Haswell" Tested, Not a Leap Ahead of i7-3770K, But Consistent

Intel's upcoming performance desktop processor Core i7-4770K, based on its next-generation "Haswell" micro-architecture, got its first formal performance preview by Tom's Hardware, which compared it to its two predecessors, the Core i7-3770K "Ivy Bridge" and Core i7-2700K "Sandy Bridge." The three were put through a battery of synthetic and real-world tests, including SiSoft SANDRA, real-world media transcoders, MSVS code compilation, and 3DSMax 2012.

In some tests, the i7-4770K offers as much of a performance upgrade over the i7-3770K, as it does over the i7-2700K, in others, it's less than linear. In its conclusion, Tom's Hardware notes that it found the i7-4770K on average, 7 to 13 percent faster than the i7-3770K in today's multi-threaded workloads, which is roughly consistent with what the i7-3770K offered over its predecessor, the i7-2700K. Find the entire preview in the source link below. Intel's Core "Haswell" line of desktop processors are expected to launch in June, 2013.

Source: Tom's Hardware
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104 Comments on Intel Core i7-4770K "Haswell" Tested, Not a Leap Ahead of i7-3770K, But Consistent

#1
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I think I'll be sticking with my i7-875K for another generation.

Though I am contemplating a FX-8320 at this point just for something new to play around with, and they're dirt cheap...
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#2
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: newtekie1
I think I'll be sticking with my i7-875K for another generation.

Though I am contemplating a FX-8320 at this point just for something new to play around with, and they're dirt cheap...
For you, it'd be a great upgrade. For anyone with IVB, not so much. Same story as with IVB launch. Frankly, most people don't really need more CPU power than what's currently available, so I can't honestly say that I'm upset at all by this. Intel is lacking on IGP, and they have improved it. Surprise!

Moving to AMD, for gaming, might be the smart move. I'm seriously considering it myself. If only they could get a decent GPU driver out...
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#3
radrok
by: cadaveca
If only they could get a decent GPU driver out...
Did you just say... :laugh:

Seriously, I honestly hope that too :toast:
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#4
xorbe
Look at that almost doubled L1 cache bandwidth on Haswell. That could probably explain half of any of the small gains. Man look at SB-E lay down the law still. So many of those tests involved the on-die GPU, oh well.
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#5
techtard
Looks like my i5-2500K will last until the next socket unless my computing needs drastically change in the near future.

People shouldn't really be expecting too much in the way of performance improvements on the CPU side of things, Intel is sacrificing pure IPC to fit their IGP on chip. Not a bad tradeoff for most.
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#6
TheHunter
I said this on another forum,
by processor multimeda float/integer/double its at least 40% faster.

That bandwidth int/float AVX could be sisoftSandra compatibility issue since 3gb/s slower, i doubt they would cripple memory bandwidth.


Also it will OC better, it has similar OC tweaks like SB-E unlocked bus? Imo another bonus, also fixed soldering like mentioned by Anandtech and option to upgrade to Broadwell

btw im aiming for this i7 4770K :pimp:
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#7
Hood
Soldered IHS Would Be Nice

I have an i5-3570K, but would consider a 4670K if they fixed the heat problem by soldering the spreader. My CPU just doesn't seem to be able to go to 4.4 and stay stable, at lowest stable voltage it hits 80c running IBT or Prime95, even in the Winter with 4 fans on my H100, and of course it's higher in Summer. I keep it at 4.3 to avoid long term degradation from the heat. K series chips are designed to overclock, so quit with the wimpy TIM, Intel, and go back to solder!
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#8
Jstn7477
I don't get why people get so bent out of shape about Intel making ~10% improvements each generation, in the same power envelope nonetheless. Ivy Bridge from my own experience consumes a lot less power than Sandy Bridge, yet is slightly faster and has better graphics. Haswell continues to build on this with even better graphics and another fair improvement in the x86 cores while maintaining the similar power envelope, if not even less. Nobody said you had to upgrade through every generation or something. I hope a Haswell-E processor comes out and shows everyone how meaningful the power consumption difference would be, especially if Intel decides to put out an 8 core consumer version.

I like to buy efficient products, so this is just my two cents. Why should I waste my electricity on an older or under-performing product that will also increase my cooling costs because it's just dumping out extra heat? It's why I've switched to Intel for many of my machines, as the processors perform great and are quite conservative for their performance. I'd love to help AMD out more, but I feel like the energy and cooling costs greatly outweigh Intel's higher initial cost, especially when using the chip under full load 24/7 for a few years. I'll be keeping an eye on their future products, though.
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#9
Lucifer666
Intel

by: RCoon
But but but intel improved the integrated graphics. That's what everybody wanted wasnt it? right? RIGHT?! Nobody buys a GPU with a 3770k nowadays right?

I expected nothing less than this.
i care not for the intergrated gpu i care about cpu performance according to these results there is no big difference between Ivybridge and Haswell so why should someone buy the 4770k....i will wait for next cpu core....:banghead:
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#10
TheGuruStud
by: jmcslob
I don't trust Tom's for anything....I can't wait to see real tests done at sites like this one and Anandtech...
That must be a joke. They're both shills for intel. So, they both should be equal on this lol.

Sounds like a clock increase more than anything (better boost) aside from multimedia using the newer instructions that are tweaked.

Sandra is a joke. Even it can be made to show 15% more (saw 30% for a specific test lol) for IVB over SB LOL. What a worthless app.
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#12
Novulux
Considering I purchased my i7-3770k for $229, I could probably get most of that back on resale. I've been wanting to upgrade my motherboard for a while.
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#13
xenocide
I usually upgrade my CPU every other architecture. Went from a Q6600 to my i5-2500k, and I plan on holding onto this thing for at least another year or two. I always figured that's what most people do when it comes to buying Intel CPU's, there is very rarely a reason to upgrade year to year. Also, those gains from HD4000->HD4600 are no joke.
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#14
Shihabyooo
by: cadaveca
WHUT?!?


Uh, no?
Sorry, am I missing something? Your pic shows Xeon processors. I was referring to the i7 3770k which has 77w TDP. While the i7 4770k is rated at 84w, if I chose to believe Tom's.

I believe Xeons and LGA2011/1366 chips do usually have higher TDP than lesser mainstream parts, no?
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#15
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: Shihabyooo
Sorry, am I missing something? Your pic shows Xeon processors. I was referring to the i7 3770k which has 77w TDP. While the i7 4770k is rated at 84w, if I chose to believe Tom's.

I believe Xeons and LGA2011/1366 chips do usually have higher TDP than lesser mainstream parts, no?
THAT Xeon is still IVB.

And it still has no solder...


and, it's just the CPU core active, not the CPU core AND the GPU, which means that 87W is contained within a smaller space than any 3770K. There's nothing wrong with the current Paste-using chips, they don't wrong too hot...people's perceptions of what is too hot is what the problem is.
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#16
Shihabyooo
by: cadaveca
THAT Xeon is still IVB.

And it still has no solder...


and, it's just the CPU core active, not the CPU core AND the GPU, which means that 87W is contained within a smaller space than any 3770K. There's nothing wrong with the current Paste-using chips, they don't wrong too hot...people's perceptions of what is too hot is what the problem is.
The matter isn't whether the Xeon is Ivy bridge or not. Yes, having no igp would give us the x86 core TDP alone, but still, we can't compare two architectures by comparing 2 different SKUs for it. Xeons and mainstream i7 aren't just the same. We are yet to know how Haswell Xeons will fare to compare them to IB's xeons.

There is nothing for either of us to argue about here, what I said earlier wasn't wrong. Comparing CPUs from the same targeted segment, mainstream i7s, Haswell is rated for a higher TDP than Ivy Bridge.
Not saying you are mistaken though, the temperature increase is indeed negligible. But still, people's got right to wish for even a couple of degrees drop in temps.

P.S: I didn't say Haswell will use solder, I think i threw in "hopefully" somewhere around.
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#17
LAN_deRf_HA
Going back and reexamining the benchmarks for the 2700k vs 3770k the IPC difference on stuff that actually affects us is 0-3%. It's looking like that's what we'll end up with here too, which means the whole farm is bet on the overclocking potential. 5-5.2 GHz 24/7 is a must to get the enthusiast community upgrading. At this rate I think I was right on target when I figured Skylake would be the next viable upgrade for sandy owners.
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#18
overclocking101
im either gonna stick out with my ole i7 875k or upping to a 3770k setup but at this point it's really not worth an upgrade. intel just keeps realesing a new socket every time they launch a new cpu. It's straight dumb to screw the people over like that, intel could easily make their boards compatible with new cpu's just they did with 775 but they are greedy.
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#19
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: overclocking101
intel could easily make their boards compatible with new cpu's just they did with 775 but they are greedy.
It has nothing to do with Intel, and everything to do with Intel's board partners. Intel is leaving the motherboard business, even, over the next three years, so really, you are barking up the wrong tree there.

Boards are changing because power delivery is changing, really. That's all. Spending MILLIONS in R&D for socket and chipset tech wouldn't be done unless absolutely required. Intel needs more power for iGPU, and did it, but required new socket. We've known about these chips and the new socket for literally years now. It's not like they decided at the last moment to change...this a plan that has been years in the making, finally coming to fruition.
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#20
Ikaruga
by: cadaveca
ntel is leaving the motherboard business
this gave me sad, i like Intel boards:shadedshu
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#21
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Good riddance. Intel boards == cheap components/built, buggy BIOS.
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#22
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: btarunr
Good riddance. Intel boards == cheap components/built, buggy BIOS.
From my perspective, it's really bad news, since many companies make their boards based off of the Intel reference(like ECS, Biostar, etc). These brands then take that base board, and add their own twist. This also means that the base BIOS is much better than AMD products from the same board maker. You might call Intel BIOSes buggy, but...AMD is a bit worse in that regard, IMHO. Heck A LOT worse.

After doing board reviews for a couple of years now, this is what really separates one brand from another...quality of materials used, and BIOS. I cannot say I have learned anything else from doing reviews, other than that the bit of extra access I had hoped for just isn't there.

Intel does a lot to help board partners, in a way that I don't see from AMD, when reviewing boards. I guess it's good, since that will allow greater difference between brands, but then I realize that there are only about 4 people globally with the skills to really deliver a great board product. The market is going to shift quite a bit after this all ends, I fear, and it might make things quite bad for the consumer.
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#23
m1dg3t
Not a bad look, better performance at lower power consumption = w1n! :respect:
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#24
trickson
OH, I have such a headache
Looks great to me. I do not see what every one is bitching about. :wtf: At least Intel is giving us some real time power performance. Even if Tom's Hardware is off a tad the #'s are impressive.
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#25
Ikaruga
by: btarunr
Good riddance. Intel boards == cheap components/built, buggy BIOS.
Intel boards lack "extra" features, they usually pick from the cheapest reliable components, but they are rock solid stable most of the times, something you can always count on if you have to build machines what you don't want to "touch" for many years. They also act as a reference many times.
Yes some boards they made didn't have solid caps and they indeed released some crap too, but which company didn't? They have good stable boards in every generations, and I like every good board regardless of the brand, so it's a loss for the industry imho.
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