Monday, April 1st 2013

Intel Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" HEDT Lineup Detailed

Intel's Core "Haswell" processor family may be just around the corner (June 2013), but that isn't stopping enthusiasts from looking out for the next HEDT (high-end desktop) processor from Intel, codenamed "Ivy Bridge-E." The new lineup could look similar to the company's current Core i7 "Sandy Bridge-E," in that it features a quad-core part in the $300-400 range, a six-core unlocked part in the $500-600 range, and an Extreme Edition six-core part around $1000. All three parts will be available in the LGA2011 package, and compatible with current X79 chipset-based motherboards (BIOS update could be needed). DDR3-1866 MHz could become the standard memory frequency for these chips.

The lineup will begin with Core i7-4820, a quad-core chip with a nominal clock speed of 3.70 GHz, Turbo Boost speed of 3.90 GHz, and 10 MB shared L3 cache. Moving on, there's the Core i7-4930K, a six-core chip with an unlocked BClk multiplier, nominal speed of 3.40 GHz, Turbo Boost speed of 3.90 GHz, and 12 MB shared L3 cache. The series will be topped off with the Core i7-4960X Extreme Edition, featuring an unlocked BClk multiplier, 3.60 GHz nominal clock speed, 4.00 GHz Turbo Boost speed, and 15 MB shared L3 cache. The Ivy Bridge-E silicon will be built on the 22 nm silicon fab process, and TDP for all three parts is rated at 130W. The three will be released some time in Q3, 2013.

Source: VR-Zone
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52 Comments on Intel Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" HEDT Lineup Detailed

#1
Kaynar
How certain it is that this will be LGA2011? Also, do we know if new LGA2011 mobos will come out with newer features that can be considered as an upgrade to the current ones? I need to upgrade my PC this year but I haven't made up my mind if I should go on a 4770K in June with new mobo or buy a 3820 with Asus Gene iv now and just upgrade CPU next year...
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#2
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Kaynar
How certain it is that this will be LGA2011?


It's going to be just like LGA1366 and X58 chipset, which supported both 45nm "Bloomfield" and 32nm "Gulftown."
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#3
Kaynar
great, thanks for the info! I guess I'm set then... I've been waiting for news on LGA2011 update for some time.

I have an off-topic question though, will my 1.5 year old Corsair H100 fit on LGA2011 with the stock backplates?
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#4
Hayder_Master
so just new cpu's no new motherboards, that's good
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#6
Jorge
No 8-cores and only marginally better performance according to those in the know. The only thing extreme is the price.
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#8
Breit
by: Dj-ElectriC
Welp. Waiting to hear about 8 cores.
I don't get that either. These chips doesn't come with a heatsink because no one is using them in a stock environment, everybody is tinkering with clock speeds and voltages (thats the purpose of unlocked cpus right?). So that also means no one with an extreme edition cpu is really caring about the TDP on these chips. Sure, lower power requirements are fine, but that only means we can queeze a bit more out of these chips before we hit the limits of our cooling equipement. I mean 300W under load only for the cpu is fully common on a highly overclocked extreme edition heading towards 5GHz.
So why not releasing a fully unlocked and uncrippled 8-core version with the full 20MB cache enabled and rate it like 150W TDP (like its Xeon brothers) or even 170W TDP (whatever is neccesary)?!
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#9
kenkickr
by: Kaynar
How certain it is that this will be LGA2011? Also, do we know if new LGA2011 mobos will come out with newer features that can be considered as an upgrade to the current ones? I need to upgrade my PC this year but I haven't made up my mind if I should go on a 4770K in June with new mobo or buy a 3820 with Asus Gene iv now and just upgrade CPU next year...
If your going to use a single video card lga 2011 wont do much for you unless you have to have quad channel ram which isnt that much noticeably better right now compared to ivys memory controller, depending on what you use.
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#10
buggalugs
Why is the TDP the same as sandy bridge-e? Shouldn't it be a little better using 22nm?

by: Hayder_Master
so just new cpu's no new motherboards, that's good
Current boards will be compatible but I'm sure there will be new motherboards with updated features, like how Asus released Premium/pro boards with socket 1366.

The sandy bridge-e boards are the biggest letdown, with half-baked features and stuff that wasn't implemented at all. Like no Intel USB 3 ports which are on standard mainstream ivy boards.

So I would find it hard to believe that the mainstream ivy chipset will have better features than the highend board with a $600-$1000 CPU on it.

New boards will have to be coming.
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#11
sergionography
by: Breit
I don't get that either. These chips doesn't come with a heatsink because no one is using them in a stock environment, everybody is tinkering with clock speeds and voltages (thats the purpose of unlocked cpus right?). So that also means no one with an extreme edition cpu is really caring about the TDP on these chips. Sure, lower power requirements are fine, but that only means we can queeze a bit more out of these chips before we hit the limits of our cooling equipement. I mean 300W under load only for the cpu is fully common on a highly overclocked extreme edition heading towards 5GHz.
So why not releasing a fully unlocked and uncrippled 8-core version with the full 20MB cache enabled and rate it like 150W TDP (like its Xeon brothers) or even 170W TDP (whatever is neccesary)?!
1. Intel wouldn't want to offer something that will beat its cutlrrent 8 core xeons at half the price

2. The die shrink to ivy barely brought any improvements in multicore which only goes to make bulldozer appear less of a fail. Note that this has 6 cores and still rated at 130w, in other words they could've done that on sandy bridge e but they didnt just so they can milk every penny out of people. If you care so much about multithread do yourself a favor and wait till steamroller, that design should only make amds excellent multicore scaling even better that's before we consider any single core improvements, and im sure it will be at a fraction of the price for ivy bridge E
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#12
lilhasselhoffer
I give.


Intel is keeping the X79 chipset. The inclusion of a slightly higher frequency is nice, but too little to justify spending another $650 at launch.

So you've got a 22 nm process running the CPU. Let's look at the 65 nm running the PCH. 65-45-32-22. Four generations between the PCH and the CPU. No wonder the PCH only supports 2 SATA III and 4 SATA II ports. No wonder the USB options were cut down from the initial estimates. Intel gave up on this generation's enthusiast platform before the party began.


If I sound bitter, it's because Intel is dragging their feet. They want $500+ for a CPU. In turn, they give us technology that is more than half a decade old to run the PCH. Intel is giving their high-end customers the bird. Fine, just don't expect me to buy another high end chip any time soon.
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#13
KevinCobley
INTEL gone nuts!!

What kind of sucker is going to touch these, if you already have Sandybridge E why would you bother to spend 500 to a grand for effectively nothing. Maybe a few updaters from x58 or earlier.
I have X58, I won't buy another until Haswell E and only then if the PCH has a minimum 6 Sata3slots and 6 USB3 ports.
If Haswell E hasn't materialized when my existing CPU/Board dies I will buy a Z87 and give INTEL high end the flick.
I will switch to AMD if they can produce something like a competitive product, they have great PCH's.
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#14
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
by: kenkickr
If your going to use a single video card lga 2011 wont do much for you unless you have to have quad channel ram which isnt that much noticeably better right now compared to ivys memory controller, depending on what you use.
That's half-right.
When Ivy hits 2011... Just think quad channel DDR3-3000+. Considering even the lower-binned Sandy Bridge E chips can run 2400+ no problem(making its IMC a little better than vanilla Sandy Bridge), it wouldn't be inconceivable that Ivy Bridge E's memory controller is a little better than vanilla Ivy Bridge's.
That being said, I'm just as disappointed as you guys that they're still offering 6c/12t as the top chip. I really don't want to have to go Xeon and have my OC capability crippled just so I can get those last 2c/4t. And I won't. Screw that.
I'm also worried they're not going to learn from vanilla Ivy Bridge and that they'll keep using that crappy thermal paste instead of soldering the die. I don't want to de-lid a $600-1000 processor to get acceptable temps.
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#15
jihadjoe
The "K" next to the 4820 makes me rather happy.
Dont' really need 8-core CPU (and if I did there's always Xeons), but the platform calls to me.
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#16
Octavean
by: jihadjoe
The "K" next to the 4820 makes me rather happy.
Dont' really need 8-core CPU (and if I did there's always Xeons), but the platform calls to me.
Good eye,.....

For what its worth I have heard rumors of a Core i7 3980X with 8 cores / 16 threads. I know I doesn't make much sense and one would have to see it released in order to believe it,....
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#17
Mathragh
I wonder how this'll turn out compared to Haswell. I suppose that Haswell won't be that big of an improvement, because that would mean this 2011 platform would be quite useless, atleast the 4 core variants. The fact that intel brings out these CPU's with these specs and prices mean that Haswell probably wont be that big of an improvement. Unless they want to cut into their own sales ofc.

Just some random speculation!
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#18
TheHunter
:(

Im waiting for a upgrade, I was about to buy I7 3820 and then upgrade to 8core IB-e but looks like there wont be 8core after all??

weird cause i saw some news about 8core not so long ago..
here: http://www.legitreviews.com/news/14815/


If this new slide is 10000% true, then im set for i7 4770K and OC that mofo to at least 5.2ghz

Anadtech said it will use new soldering not that bs like by IvyBridge, also unlocked base clock will kick some serious ass :D


@[USER=78901]Mathragh[/USER]

According to wiki apparently 10% faster by default, add better OC and it will be a worthy upgrade for older cpu users.


Performance
Compared to Ivy Bridge (expected):
  • Twice the vector processing performance.
  • At least 10% sequential CPU performance increase (8 execution ports per core versus 6).
  • Up to double the performance of the integrated GPU. (Haswell GT3 vs Ivy Bridge HD4000)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haswell_%28microarchitecture%29
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#19
GamerGuy
Heh, looks like I don't need to think about an upgrade IB-E after all, actually I am rather pleased that there is no octo core IB-E.
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#20
Inceptor
by: Breit
I don't get that either. These chips doesn't come with a heatsink because no one is using them in a stock environment, everybody is tinkering with clock speeds and voltages (thats the purpose of unlocked cpus right?). So that also means no one with an extreme edition cpu is really caring about the TDP on these chips. Sure, lower power requirements are fine, but that only means we can queeze a bit more out of these chips before we hit the limits of our cooling equipement. I mean 300W under load only for the cpu is fully common on a highly overclocked extreme edition heading towards 5GHz.
So why not releasing a fully unlocked and uncrippled 8-core version with the full 20MB cache enabled and rate it like 150W TDP (like its Xeon brothers) or even 170W TDP (whatever is neccesary)?!
There will be no 8 core version.
These are crippled Xeons for the consumer 'enthusiast' market. They're priced for consumers, Xeons are much much more expensive. Intel is not going to sell a Xeon for cheap just because you want one... they would lose large amounts of money as the enterprise and workstation customers buy up all the cheap 8 cores for their servers.
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#22
ensabrenoir
.........its truely the end of an era..... the. Great. Cpu war is over.......the needlessly overpowered pc is almost gone. And we await the time until desktops become. "The shiznit" once more to the masses.......still gonna upgrade anyway follow me if u dare..... or have enough play. Dough.
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#23
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: ensabrenoir
.........its truely the end of an era..... the. Great. Cpu war is over.......the needlessly overpowered pc is almost gone. And we await the time until desktops become. "The shiznit" once more to the masses.......still gonna upgrade anyway follow me if u dare..... or have enough play. Dough.
Most desktops is way way overpowered by default. No big deal there.
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#24
nickbaldwin86
by: Frick
Most desktops is way way overpowered by default. No big deal there.
understatement of the year

What do you do? browse the interwebs all day? yes for Facebook and Techpowerup a monster workstation with a few high end GPUs is a waste of power, but I still can bring even the most top of the line workstation to its knees and watch it flop :nutkick:

And I am not even talking about for gaming, though gaming will do it real quickly.
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#25
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: jihadjoe
The "K" next to the 4820 makes me rather happy.
You make it sound like non-K CPUs on skt2011 can't overclock...


The highest multi I can use it 43, but that's more than enough when your bclk can hit 133Mhz.

That's my 24/7 OC, it does go higher but my motherboard doesn't let me hit 5Ghz, 4.75-4.8Ghz is about the best I can do stable at semi-reasonable temperatures, but 4.4 has been a comfy spot.

I don't think I'm going to be upgrading (even more so if I'm going to have to de-lid an IVB-E for decent temps,) but if I were, I would go with a 6c and if prices of the 3930k goes down, I might rather just go with that instead if I do take that route. We'll have to see how these new CPUs hold up. SB-E has a little higher latency because of the huge memory controller and the larger L3 cache, so maybe the shrink will do some good things with the IMC with cache latencies.

I'll wait for benchmarks before I start placing judgment on Intel.

Also for all of those who are saying X79 is a let down, unless you own a SB-E machine, I would stop talking about what you don't know anything about. I've been very happy with my X79 machine and it has delivered in every way shape and form. It's fun to use and it's a great platform to work on. I also find it rather amusing when people complain about the power consumption despite the facts that it has more cache, double the size of the IMC and double the size of the PCI-E controller, and add a couple cores. So yeah, I can perfectly understand why SB-E eats more power and I'm willing to bet that it only has part to do with the cores and has a lot to do with cache, the IMC, and the PCI-E controller.

I love my SB-E rig and I know a lot of other people who love theirs too. So despite it lacking more SATA 6Gb ports (do you really have more than two or four SSDs?) it's really not a bad platform. The PCH doesn't do nearly as much as a chipset in that position as done in the past. The CPU does most of everything and in most modern rigs, 2 integrated SATA 6Gb ports and 2 external ones if the board has it, is plenty.

Also don't complain about SATA, if you have a skt2011 machine you have 40 PCI-E lanes that are ready to get filled up with things that don't need to be video cards. If I were really going to run more than 2 SSDs, I would rather have a decent RAID controller to handle them as opposed to using RSTe.

Also last time I checked z77 also only has two SATA 6Gb ports off the PCH, so it's not like it's a downgrade though.
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