Tuesday, May 14th 2013

D-Link Now Shipping New Lineup of 11AC Routers

D-Link today announced it is now shipping a new line of AC Routers with the availability of the Wireless AC1750 Router (DIR-868L), Wireless AC1200 Router (DIR-860L), Wireless AC1000 Router (DIR-820L) and Wireless AC750 Router (DIR-810L). Offering next-generation Wi-Fi speeds, D-Link's latest 802.11ac Routers deliver a range of wireless speeds and price points for creating a reliable and strong Wi-Fi home network ideal for HD video streaming, online gaming, and multiple user activities.

"Today's average home now has more than 15 devices, oftentimes with multiple iPads, iPhones, as well as Android phones and tablets, and consumers are looking for the best in wireless connectivity to help deliver uninterrupted HD video streaming, online gaming and multiple user capabilities," said Daniel Kelley , vice president of marketing, D-Link Systems, Inc. "With the introduction of the new 11AC Router line, D-Link provides next-generation wireless speeds to meet the needs of the digital home coupled with advanced remote management and sharing capabilities to better suit mobile lifestyles."

The Wireless AC1750 Dual Band Gigabit Cloud Router and Wireless AC1200 Dual Band Gigabit Cloud Router deliver speeds of up to 1750 Mbps (N450 Mbps + AC1300 Mbps) and 1200 Mbps (N300 + AC867 Mbps) respectively. In addition, the Wireless AC1000 Dual Band Cloud Router offers speeds of up to 1000 Mbps (N300 Mbps + AC650 Mbps) and the Wireless AC750 Dual Band Cloud Router offers speeds of up to 750 Mbps (N300 Mbps + AC433 Mbps). Eliminating Wi-Fi interference for faster and more reliable Internet, D-Link's family of AC routers are equipped with Dual Band technology enabling users to perform simple Internet activities on the 2.4 GHz band, and more demanding activities on the cleaner, interference free 5 GHz band. The routers are also backward compatible with 802.11a/b/g/n devices for seamless connectivity.

Offering easy remote network management, the Cloud Routers enable users to see what websites are being visited, block unwanted connections, and set up automatic email alerts when unauthorized connections are made on any iPhone, iPad or Android device with the free mydlink Lite app. In addition, the routers feature a USB port that works with the free SharePort mobile app, enabling users to stream and share photos, music and movie files directly to their mobile device. The AC routers also support easy setup using a mobile phone or tablet with the free Quick Router Setup (QRS) app.

For fast wired connectivity, the Wireless AC1750 Dual Band Gigabit Cloud Router and AC1200 Dual Band Gigabit Cloud Router are equipped with four Gigabit Ethernet ports and the Wireless AC1000 Dual Band Cloud Router and AC750 Dual Band Cloud Router are equipped with four Fast Ethernet ports.

Availability and Pricing
The new line of AC routers will be available throughout D-Link's vast network of retail and e-tail outlets in the United States. Detailed specifications and information are available online at www.dlink.com with street pricing as follows:
  • Wireless AC 1750 Dual Band Gigabit Cloud Router (DIR-868L) - $169.99
  • Wireless AC 1200 Dual Band Gigabit Router (DIR-860L) - $149.99
  • Wireless AC1000 Dual Band Cloud Router (DIR-820L) - $119.99
  • Wireless AC750 Dual Band Cloud Router (DIR-810L ) - $79.99
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6 Comments on D-Link Now Shipping New Lineup of 11AC Routers

#1
arterius2
the image is confusing as hell, you've got 3 things labeled 'AC1000' and 2 things 'AC1200'
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#2
Major_A
N450 Mbps + AC1300 Mbps
Wireless is now getting faster than wired gigabit ports. Any chance there's a consumer 10Gb chipset on the way?
Posted on Reply
#3
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Major_A
Wireless is now getting faster than wired gigabit ports. Any chance there's a consumer 10Gb chipset on the way?
It's not, that's total bandwidth. Keep in mind that wi-fi speeds are not a measurement of maximum capacity in on direction like Ethernet is, the total of both upstream and downstream. So if you have 1300Mbit wi-fi, the max theoretical speed in one direction is half of that, 650Mbit. Much like how my 5Ghz wi-fi at 243Mbit-300Mbit is really running at 121Mbit-150Mbit in any one direction.
Posted on Reply
#4
Freedom4556
Kinda

by: Aquinus
It's not, that's total bandwidth. Keep in mind that wi-fi speeds are not a measurement of maximum capacity in on direction like Ethernet is, the total of both upstream and downstream. So if you have 1300Mbit wi-fi, the max theoretical speed in one direction is half of that, 650Mbit. Much like how my 5Ghz wi-fi at 243Mbit-300Mbit is really running at 121Mbit-150Mbit in any one direction.
Well, more precisely, 1300 is the aggregate bandwidth of multiple spatial streams (and bands). With 802.11n the maximum speed you can get with a single antenna is 150 Mbit/s but that is with channel bonding (40 MHz channels), which is inadvisable on the crowded 2.4 GHz band. So the more antennae you have the more spatial streams you're using. It's kinda like if I teamed three 10/100 ports and called it "Fast Ethernet 300." It's misleading marketing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11ac#New_scenarios_and_configurations
Posted on Reply
#5
Freedom4556
Aha

by: Aquinus
It's not, that's total bandwidth. Keep in mind that wi-fi speeds are not a measurement of maximum capacity in on direction like Ethernet is, the total of both upstream and downstream. So if you have 1300Mbit wi-fi, the max theoretical speed in one direction is half of that, 650Mbit. Much like how my 5Ghz wi-fi at 243Mbit-300Mbit is really running at 121Mbit-150Mbit in any one direction.
Judging from the manual pg 47, they are using 80 MHz channels, which means 433.3 Mb/s per antenna based on the Wiki link from earlier, and that gives the 1300 Mb/s number with three antennae (just like a typical N router). Note that 80MHz channels are only possible on the 5 GHz band as the 2.4 is too narrow. Max throughput for 801.11ac is up to 86.7 Mb/s for a single 20 MHz channel as compared to 72.2 with 802.11n and 54 with 802.11g. They are now using 256-QAM with ac where they were only using 64 QAM with n. That is where all the speed improvement is coming from.

http://www.dlink.com/-/media/Consumer_Products/DIR/DIR%20868L/Manual/DIR868LA1manual042213v1.pdf
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#6
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Freedom4556
It's kinda like if I teamed three 10/100 ports and called it "Fast Ethernet 300." It's misleading marketing.
Wrong, which is the point I was trying to make I the first place. Ethernet doesn't work like that because if you go three 100mbit ports, that's 300Mbit/300Mbit you're getting as opposed to 150Mbit/150Mbit if it were half-duplex (more or less.) So regardless of what they did to the wireless itself, it's still limited and as you said, the wider the frequency the more likely you're going to pick up some interference from another band.

by: Freedom4556
Judging from the manual pg 47, they are using 80 MHz channels, which means 433.3 Mb/s per antenna based on the Wiki link from earlier, and that gives the 1300 Mb/s number with three antennae (just like a typical N router). Note that 80MHz channels are only possible on the 5 GHz band as the 2.4 is too narrow. Max throughput for 801.11ac is up to 86.7 Mb/s for a single 20 MHz channel as compared to 72.2 with 802.11n and 54 with 802.11g. They are now using 256-QAM with ac where they were only using 64 QAM with n. That is where all the speed improvement is coming from.
Which is only good if you don't have anyone nearby with a 5Ghz network. We'll see what happens but I suspect that QAM-256's signal will degrade more quickly than QAM-64 did. As you start using higher order QAM modes, you get less and less noise resiliency from the signal itself.
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