Tuesday, August 13th 2013

ZOTAC Amplifies GeForce GTX 780 for Class-Dominating Performance

ZOTAC International, a global innovator and manufacturer of graphics cards, mainboards and mini-PCs, today amplifies the GeForce GTX 780 beyond 1 GHz for class-dominating performance. The insanely-fast ZOTAC GeForce GTX 780 AMP! Edition gives demanding gamers an extra performance edge for superior smoothness without sacrificing maximum visual quality.

"Our engineers spent extra time fine-tuning the ZOTAC GeForce GTX 780 AMP! Edition to perfection," says Carsten Berger, senior director, ZOTAC International. "We took that extra time to push the base clock past 1 GHz, boost the memory clock by 3-percent and top it off with our brand new Triple Silencer enhanced cooling system."

Beyond the insanely-fast clock speeds is a brand new ZOTAC Triple Silencer enhanced cooling solution that incorporates three quiet high-performance fans that reduce temperatures up to 10C and noise levels by 15dBA under heavy gaming loads. The ZOTAC Triple Silencer is finished off with signature orange fan blades and a black fan shroud for styling that looks as good as it performs.

It's time to play with the ZOTAC GeForce GTX 780 AMP! Edition!

General details
  • New ZOTAC GeForce GTX 780 AMP! Edition graphics card
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 GPU
  • Engine clock: 1006 MHz (base) / 1059 MHz (boost)
  • 2,304 processor cores
  • 3 GB GDDR5 memory
  • Memory clock: 6208 MHz
  • 384-bit memory interface
  • Triple Silencer Enhanced Cooling System
  • PCI Express 3.0 interface
  • NVIDIA GPU Boost 2.0 technology
  • NVIDIA Surround capable
  • NVIDIA FXAA & TXAA technology
  • NVIDIA Adaptive Vertical Sync
  • NVIDIA SLI (3-way) ready
  • NVIDIA SHIELD gaming portable ready
  • NVIDIA NVENC video transcoding acceleration capable
  • DirectX 11.1 (feature level 11_0) technology & Shader Model 5.1
  • OpenGL 4.3 compatible
  • Blu-ray 3D ready
  • Loss-less audio bitstream capable
  • ZOTAC Boost Premium software bundle
  • Nero Kwikmedia
    XBMC
    UNIGINE Heaven DX11 Benchmark
  • ZOTAC Splinter Cell Compilation game voucher
  • Splinter Cell Double Agent
    Splinter Cell Conviction
    Splinter Cell Blacklist (downloadable summer 2013)
Specifications:
Add your own comment

10 Comments on ZOTAC Amplifies GeForce GTX 780 for Class-Dominating Performance

#1
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
God I hate the marketing bulsh*t these companies muster up and spend thousands of dollars to write. Though admittedly, the card looks nice, but I'll overclock my cards myself thanks, and retain warranty regardless.
Posted on Reply
#2
jihadjoe
Zotac cards always seem to have the highest out-of-box clocks, but sometimes they seem to be already overclocked past the point of instability.

I'd take ASUS or MSI's factory OC stuff, thank you very much.
Posted on Reply
#3
BarbaricSoul
by: RCoon
but I'll overclock my cards myself thanks, and retain warranty regardless.
I agree. To be perfectly honest, I've never understood buying a factory OC'ed card when the OC's are never anywhere near what someone can accomplish on their own.
Posted on Reply
#4
Fourstaff
by: BarbaricSoul
I agree. To be perfectly honest, I've never understood buying a factory OC'ed card when the OC's are never anywhere near what someone can accomplish on their own.
Sometimes the factory binning helps.
Posted on Reply
#5
EarthDog
by: Fourstaff
Sometimes the factory binning helps.
That is overrated IMO. Perhaps there is a slight higher average on the Matrix/Lightning/etc but for the most part they are all within a 20-30MHz range at the high end. MUCH more depends on the quality of the core than the power bits and PCB for ambient overclockers. ;)
Posted on Reply
#6
radrok
by: jihadjoe
Zotac cards always seem to have the highest out-of-box clocks, but sometimes they seem to be already overclocked past the point of instability.

I'd take ASUS or MSI's factory OC stuff, thank you very much.
Why? Zotac has more warranty time and better than both combined.

My Zotac GPU has 5 yrs warranty, the only one that comes close is EVGA as far as I know.
Posted on Reply
#7
HumanSmoke
by: radrok
Why? Zotac has more warranty time and better than both combined.
My Zotac GPU has 5 yrs warranty, the only one that comes close is EVGA as far as I know.
Seconded. My experience with Zotac has been good. Usually reasonably priced in relation to the competition (esp for the clockspeed), and support from both the PC Partner AIB divisions (Sapphire and Zotac) has been more prompt and easier to navigate than Asus, Gigabyte (local geographic distribution office) and MSI (3.5 weeks to get a reply from presumably head office last time out effectively curtailed my Microstar purchasing).
Still tend to go with EVGA. As a frequent upgrader, having the warranty tied to the card rather than the registered owner makes resell a lot easier.
Posted on Reply
#8
hairy spotter
by: HumanSmoke
Seconded. My experience with Zotac has been good. Usually reasonably priced in relation to the competition (esp for the clockspeed), and support from both the PC Partner AIB divisions (Sapphire and Zotac) has been more prompt and easier to navigate than Asus, Gigabyte (local geographic distribution office) and MSI (3.5 weeks to get a reply from presumably head office last time out effectively curtailed my Microstar purchasing).
Still tend to go with EVGA. As a frequent upgrader, having the warranty tied to the card rather than the registered owner makes resell a lot easier.
Thirded. Zotac even allowed me to voltmod the bios of my GTX580 because of some instability issues (after having convinced them that my WC loop was adequate enough to handle it) while still being covered by warranty!

Nothing but praise from me.
Posted on Reply
#9
jihadjoe
My gripe was mostly to do with some of their older stuff. A friend got a 570 AMP! which would become unstable at the factory clocks.

Turned out the solution was to raise the voltage from 1.0 to about 1.025, but after going through the Zotac forums it seems they had a lot of similar cases to this. My surmise is that really some of the AMP! edition cards are so aggressively clocked that there is very little tolerance for voltage. They could very well be stable as tested by Zotac, but a slightly lower-end (or older PSU) and things very quickly become less than ideal.

Obviously a TPU reader would have very little trouble with something like this, but for the less technically savvy it could be a bit of a headache when your new GPU is unstable out of the box.
Posted on Reply
#10
morphy
by: jihadjoe
My gripe was mostly to do with some of their older stuff. A friend got a 570 AMP! which would become unstable at the factory clocks.

Turned out the solution was to raise the voltage from 1.0 to about 1.025, but after going through the Zotac forums it seems they had a lot of similar cases to this. My surmise is that really some of the AMP! edition cards are so aggressively clocked that there is very little tolerance for voltage. They could very well be stable as tested by Zotac, but a slightly lower-end (or older PSU) and things very quickly become less than ideal.

Obviously a TPU reader would have very little trouble with something like this, but for the less technically savvy it could be a bit of a headache when your new GPU is unstable out of the box.
that could happen with any mfg tho. I remember Asus had a huge problem with one of their hi end 600 series cards till a bios fix 'fixed' it by lowering clocks.
But nothing wrong with Zotac..I buy vanilla..rather oc myself and so far am very happy with it.
Posted on Reply