Friday, August 30th 2013

Samsung Now Mass Producing Industry's Most Advanced DDR4

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the world leader in advanced memory technology, today announced that it is mass producing the most advanced DDR4 memory, for enterprise servers in next-generation data centers.

With the introduction of these high-performance, high-density DDR4 modules, Samsung can better support the need for advanced DDR4 in rapidly expanding, large-scale data centers and other enterprise server applications.

Early market availability of the 4-gigabit (Gb) DDR4 devices, which use 20 nanometer (nm)-class process technology, will facilitate demand for 16-gigabyte (GB) and 32 GB memory modules. This compares to conventional DRAM of which 8 GB modules using a 30 nm-class process technology are still commonplace.

"The adoption of ultra-high-speed DDR4 in next-generation server systems this year will initiate a push toward advanced premium memory across the enterprise," said Young-Hyun Jun, executive vice president, memory sales & marketing, Samsung Electronics. "After providing cutting-edge performance with our timely supply of 16 GB DDR3 earlier this year, we are continuing to extend the premium server market in 2013 and will now focus on higher density and added performance with 32 GB DDR4, and contribute to even greater growth of the green IT market in 2014."

In next-generation enterprise servers, the use of higher speed DRAM raises system level performance and lowers overall power consumption significantly. By adopting DDR4 memory technology early, OEMs can minimize operational costs and maximize performance to provide more favorable returns on investments.

Production of Samsung's 20 nm-class 4 Gb DDR4 follows the introduction of 50 nm-class 2 Gb DDR3 in 2008, culminating in a full-fledged transition to DDR4 for large-scale data centers and other enterprise applications in just five years. The 4 Gb-based DDR4 has the fastest DRAM data transmission rate of 2,667 megabits per second - a 1.25-fold increase over 20 nm-class DDR3, while lowering power consumption by more than 30 percent.

Based on Samsung's 20 nm-class DRAM, the world's highest performing and smallest 4 Gb DRAM chip, the company has now developed the industry's largest lineup of products tailored to applications from servers to mobile devices. This will provide global customers with the widest range of highly advanced low-power, high-performance green memory solutions.

Samsung remains committed to advancing the development of next-generation green memory devices and solutions in IT markets. With innovative developmental approaches directed at systems, solutions and software (the three S's), the company will continue to reinforce its green memory strategy and maximize the creation of shared value for its customers, while facilitating further expansion of the green IT marketplace.
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33 Comments on Samsung Now Mass Producing Industry's Most Advanced DDR4

#1
RejZoR
Good thing there are so many boards where you can use this most advanced RAM...
Posted on Reply
#2
repman244
by: RejZoR
Good thing there are so many boards where you can use this most advanced RAM...
Give back your DDR3 then since it was the same when they started producing.
What did you expect? All motherboards supporting something that isn't mass produced? :wtf:
Posted on Reply
#3
progste
32 GB modules! :D
i wonder if they managed to lower the timings
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#4
buggalugs
by: progste
32 GB modules! :D
i wonder if they managed to lower the timings
They should have skipped it and went straight to DDR5
Posted on Reply
#6
radrok
Can't wait for a 256 GB X99 system to enable humongous ram disks :toast:

Or even better: a 2p DDR4 system with half a TB memory :)
Posted on Reply
#7
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: radrok
Or even better: a 2p DDR4 system with half a TB memory
I'm pretty sure you can buy motherboards now that use DDR3-RDIMMs that can fill 512GB of memory of 2P servers. There are 4P Xeon servers that can hold 1.5TB IIRC. Yeah, there are 2P LGA2011 motherboards with 24 DIMM slots that can handle 768GB of memory.

Hate to burst your bubble, but you can already do this. ;)
Posted on Reply
#8
radrok
Yes you can but not with a consumer platform, that was my point.
Posted on Reply
#9
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: radrok
Yes you can but not with a consumer platform, that was my point.
2P motherboards are a normal consumer platform? When the heck did that happen? :slap:
Posted on Reply
#10
Hood
by: Aquinus
2P motherboards are a normal consumer platform? When the heck did that happen? :slap:
No, but X99 will be a consumer platform - try to pay attention...
Posted on Reply
#11
radrok
by: Aquinus
2P motherboards are a normal consumer platform? When the heck did that happen? :slap:
SR-2 and SR-X are consumer platforms last time I checked :confused:
Posted on Reply
#12
m1dg3t
People are still wanting/looking to buy their lo - pro ddr3 stix, nevermind ddr4!!
Posted on Reply
#13
Patriot
by: Aquinus
2P motherboards are a normal consumer platform? When the heck did that happen? :slap:
2008 intel skulltrail

Patriot notes that folders have a different perspective on normal. :D
Posted on Reply
#14
hckngrtfakt
by: buggalugs
They should have skipped it and went straight to DDR5
Might as well go for GDDR5 :p

PS4 FTW :D
Posted on Reply
#15
TheHunter
So something like 2x 16Gb 3600MHz
Posted on Reply
#16
1c3d0g
Excellent news. This means by the time Haswell-E arrives, availability won't be an issue. :toast:
Posted on Reply
#17
superkickstart
by: hckngrtfakt
Might as well go for GDDR5 :p

PS4 FTW :D
Pfft... Not that antiqued stuff anymore. GDDR6 :rockout:
Posted on Reply
#18
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: radrok
SR-2 and SR-X are consumer platforms last time I checked :confused:
Yeah, we can see how long that lasted. :laugh:
In all seriousness, the majority of Skulltrail is just a workstation board in disguise. I would hardly call that a normal consumer platform.

by: Patriot
2008 intel skulltrail

Patriot notes that folders have a different perspective on normal. :D
Well, a folder could utilize a 4P server, that doesn't mean that it's normal. :slap:
Posted on Reply
#19
Prima.Vera
by: superkickstart
Pfft... Not that antiqued stuff anymore. GDDR6 :rockout:
GDDR5 IS actually DDR3 tuned for graphics performance...
Posted on Reply
#20
Hayder_Master
ok those DDR4's for witch socket's? even new Intel X-sereis did not support ddr4 !
Posted on Reply
#21
radrok
by: Hayder_Master
ok those DDR4's for witch socket's? even new Intel X-sereis did not support ddr4 !
Socket 2011-3 Most likely :toast:
Posted on Reply
#22
Thefumigator
Actually as I posted in the hardware forums, I work in a computer company and during a reunion with the main manager, he told us we will be offering socket AM4 computers with DDR4 memory as gaming PC solution by the end of this year, most precisely before christmas. Which is starting to make some sense now...

http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/showthread.php?t=187963

Well, at least DDR4 may be available by the end of the year but what about the rest? CPU and mainboards? none as far as I know, or maybe AMD is playing plain quiet this time... just a theory
Posted on Reply
#23
freeboy
what did the guys say when we updated the 8808 chips? "My abacus still works great" .. lol
We need this to carry more video, we are in a video revolution with nearly a billion smartphones.. the advance of streaming on deamand content, tomorrow already doesnt look like today. OK "need", maybe not, but since we are talking about next wave increases and my hand held device outruns most 3 year old pc,s, the "need" from a business model perspective to run more in a faster broader way for SERVER application is NOW. How do you think I can stream endless stuff, or talk with face time or Skype? How can the big Brother get bigger? oops did I say that out loud? lol
Posted on Reply
#24
MikeMurphy
by: Prima.Vera
GDDR5 IS actually DDR3 tuned for graphics performance...
GDDR5 and DDR3 are completely different memory. GDDR5 doubles the throughput of DDR3 per clock, but it consumes far more electricity doing so. It's an entirely different architecture.

This is why laptop / mobiles rarely ever use GDDR5.

DDR4 is very different, yet again.

Don't mix them up, and certainly don't mistake any of these as the same, or similar.
Posted on Reply
#25
Prima.Vera
Mike, check your facts again, or post a link to prove your claims.
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