Wednesday, October 30th 2013

EIZO Releases the FORIS FG2421 240 Hz Gaming Monitor

EIZO Corporation today announced the 23.5-inch FORIS FG2421, the world's first gaming monitor with a 240 Hz refresh rate. The FORIS FG2421 also features a low input lag and gaming preset modes that were developed with professional gamers to make it ideal for first-person shooter, racing, fighting, and other fast-action genres.

The FORIS FG2421 comes with a new feature called Turbo 240 that surpasses the 120 Hz refresh rate of conventional gaming monitors. Turbo 240 converts 120 Hz signals to 240 Hz by controlling the blinking of the LED backlight. This high refresh rate along with a response time of less than 1 ms produces the smoothest image display available on a gaming monitor.

The FORIS FG2421 is the first gaming monitor with a refresh rate of 120 Hz or more to use a VA (vertical alignment) LCD panel. The VA panel provides a wide viewing angle of 176° and a high native contrast ratio of 5000:1 for deep blacks. This high contrast ratio increases visibility in dark scenes making it easier to spot enemies.

EIZO developed its own integrated circuit to minimize the input lag or the time it takes for commands from a keyboard, mouse, or controller to appear on the screen. With a 60 Hz input signal the input lag is less than one frame and with a 120 Hz signal it is less than 1.5 frames.

Two color modes for FPS (first-person shooter) and one for RTS (real-time strategy) games are included. The FPS and RTS modes were co-developed with professional gamers from Fnatic, a leading eSports team, to provide ideal brightness, contrast, and gamma settings. Three fully-customizable modes for users who want to import and export their own settings are also built-in.

EIZO is bundling its new software, ScreenManager Pro for Gaming, with the FORIS FG2421. This software lets users download gaming presets used by professional gamers from gaming.eizo.com or export their own customized color modes to other gamers who also own the FORIS FG2421. ScreenManager Pro for Gaming can also be used to assign hot keys to turn the monitor's power and mute on/off, as well as adjust the color mode and screen size. It is compatible with Windows 8, 7, and Vista.

HDMI, DisplayPort, and DVI-D ports provide connectivity with PCs, consoles, Blu-ray players and cameras. A USB hub with one upstream and two downstream ports lets users connect peripherals such as a mouse and keyboard to the monitor. A line-out jack for connecting to external speakers and a headphone jack provide further functionality.

Fast action games are often played at resolutions less than the monitor's native 1920 x 1080. To allow for using the full 23.5-inch screen, the user can enlarge the image while maintaining the aspect ratio or expand it to fill the entire screen.

The FORIS FG2421 is designed to provide viewing comfort over long hours of gameplay. With the Turbo 240 set to off, the FORIS FG2421 maintains a refresh rate of 120 Hz and uses EIZO's own hybrid technology for providing flicker-free images at any brightness level. A sensor on the front of the monitor detects the ambient brightness and adjusts the screen's brightness to the ideal level which saves energy and prevents eyestrain. The sensor can enabled/disabled by the user.

The FORIS FG2421 debuts a new cabinet design. The back of the monitor features an illuminated EIZO logo on a glossy surface that is surrounded by a vermillion frame. Above this frame is a handle for carrying the monitor to a LAN party or gaming event. For viewing comfort, the stand provides 60 mm of height adjustment, 25° of tilt and 344° of swivel. A cable holder contributes to a clutter-free desktop.

The five-year manufacturer's warranty ensures a long service life and is significantly longer than the three-year warranty of most gaming monitors.
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42 Comments on EIZO Releases the FORIS FG2421 240 Hz Gaming Monitor

#1
droopyRO
240Hz ? yes, now you need four R290x in CF to play CounterStrike :B
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#2
Rowsol
I bet it's amazing to play games at 240 on this.
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#3
johnsushant
by: droopyRO
240Hz ? yes, now you need four R290x in CF to play CounterStrike :B
I like how they put a picture of Counter-Strike Global Offensive. They are understanding their target audience well. Even my 7850 gets 200+ FPS easy on CS:GO(Also because no CS:GO pro actually plays at FULL HD and the game is more CPU dependent than anything). Anything that makes the game feel even a little more smoother will always be welcome.
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#4
Wile E
Power User
by: droopyRO
240Hz ? yes, now you need four R290x in CF to play CounterStrike :B
Except it still only accepts 120hz input.
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#5
buggalugs
by: droopyRO
240Hz ? yes, now you need four R290x in CF to play CounterStrike :B
No you don't.
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#6
urza26
Fast action games are often played at resolutions less than the monitor's native 1920 x 1080.
Did they just make that up or have I been living in a cave for the last decade?
Posted on Reply
#7
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: urza26
Did they just make that up or have I been living in a cave for the last decade?
Pro SC2 and CSGO players lower game settings for improved framerates and zero framedrop during intense moments of explosions, physics, and 200/200 army engagements.

You'd be amazed how hard it is to strafe-stop-headshot an AWPer when you're frame suddenly drops down a few because of a smoke grenade.
Posted on Reply
#8
THE_EGG
This is going to be cheap D: Still though, really cool stuff.
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#9
Prima.Vera
by: Cristian_25H

Fast action games are often played at resolutions less than the monitor's native 1920 x 1080. To allow for using the full 23.5-inch screen, the user can enlarge the image while maintaining the aspect ratio or expand it to fill the entire screen.
Wait. Wot??!:wtf:

by: RCoon
Pro SC2 and CSGO players lower game settings for improved framerates and zero framedrop during intense moments of explosions, physics, and 200/200 army engagements.

You'd be amazed how hard it is to strafe-stop-headshot an AWPer when you're frame suddenly drops down a few because of a smoke grenade.
Name 1 game please, that have this problem. :) And please, don't tell me that professional gamers are gaming with integrated graphics... :))
Posted on Reply
#10
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: Prima.Vera
Wait. Wot??!:wtf:



Name 1 game please, that have this problem. :) And please, don't tell me that professional gamers are gaming with integrated graphics... :))
Pro SC2 players lower in game settings. It is a well known fact. Research it yourself.
Posted on Reply
#11
urza26
by: RCoon
Pro SC2 and CSGO players lower game settings for improved framerates and zero framedrop during intense moments of explosions, physics, and 200/200 army engagements.

You'd be amazed how hard it is to strafe-stop-headshot an AWPer when you're frame suddenly drops down a few because of a smoke grenade.
That explains running the game at low settings, but still dropping the resolution seems ridiculous. You either play with black bars or with a poorly interpolated screen resolution, neither is a favorable situation.
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#12
lays
Yup, professional gamers generally want the fastest clearest picture possible

If that involves killing all eye candy and playing at weird res's they will do it

I'm not up on the latest, but way back when we were playing Quake 1 and 3 competitively, I could easily tell the diff between 72 fps and 77 fps and we made every effort to dumb down the graphics as much as possible - blocky legoland graphics, or even pure smooth greyscale levels with zero textures were de-rigeur

Lengthy experiments would be done with fps and hz - we even bought old 19 inch CRT Trinitron monitors because they could do 125 hz matched with the optimum 125 fps in Q3 for fastest possible movement speed in the game

Now, thank god, i am out of that batshiat loop and just playing games for "fun", enjoying the shiny graphics and so on.. but every now and then, I'll notice myself dropping the graphics down.. fiddling with res..
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#13
arterius2
by: urza26
That explains running the game at low settings, but still dropping the resolution seems ridiculous. You either play with black bars or with a poorly interpolated screen resolution, neither is a favorable situation.
yea never run your games beside the native monitor resolution or it looks like utter crap. you have two choices really, either lower the quality setting or get better hardware, hard to imagine so called "pros" couldn't deal with either.
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#14
Solidstate89
The FORIS FG2421 comes with a new feature called Turbo 240 that surpasses the 120 Hz refresh rate of conventional gaming monitors. Turbo 240 converts 120 Hz signals to 240 Hz by controlling the blinking of the LED backlight.
So basically it's bullshit interpolation? It's not actually displaying 240 frames.
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#15
arterius2
by: Solidstate89
So basically it's bullshit interpolation? It's not actually displaying 240 frames.
I doubt there's enough bandwidth for 240hz
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#16
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: Solidstate89
So basically it's bullshit interpolation? It's not actually displaying 240 frames.
If it is interpolation, then this monitor is most definitely not for gamers, because interpolation causes no end of issues with fake frames.
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#17
johnsushant
Counter Strike Global Offensive pros use lower resolution for multiple reasons.
The models in the game are way too thin in 16:9 as compared to 4:3 or even 16:10. Pros prefer to use the lower resolution even though it hampers their FOV(Field of Vision) to some extent. Also many Counter Strike 1.6 players were used to playing on CRTs with lower resolution(And higher refresh rates) so this makes the transition painless.
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#18
johnsushant
by: RCoon
If it is interpolation, then this monitor is most definitely not for gamers, because interpolation causes no end of issues with fake frames.
It couldn't be interpolation or the gaming community is definitely not going to like this. It is better for a person to move in a comparatively laggy motion than moving absolutely smoothly. The person will momentarily appear to be at a position where his hitboxes are not and shooting that person will make you feel like you shot him but the shots won't register.
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#19
TheHunter
Well at least it is a 100% 120HZ with fancy VA LCD panel, still better then nothing imo. ;)

HDMI: 15 - 100 kHz, 23 - 122 Hz
DVI: 31 - 138 kHz, 59 - 122 Hz
DisplayPort: 31 - 138 kHz, 49 - 122 Hz
http://www.eizo.com/global/products/foris/fg2421/index.html
You can always disable that turbo 240Hz boost.



I wish Eizo would have released this monitor 1 year ago when I bought my Eizo FS2333, that 120HZ and better contrast panel looks nicer :)
But the price is not so nice 500€...
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#20
Sp33d Junki3
It is not interpolation.
monitor most likely has two 240Hz modes.... frame doubling or black frame insertion.
Plus you are getting a VA not TN, with a much higher base contrast of 5000:1 compared to every monitor that uses 800:1 or 1000:1 as standard. Also a higher 400cd/m2, which is great.
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#21
Solidstate89
by: Sp33d Junki3
It is not interpolation.
monitor most likely has two 240Hz modes.... frame doubling or black frame insertion.
Plus you are getting a VA not TN, with a much higher base contrast of 5000:1 compared to every monitor that uses 800:1 or 1000:1 as standard. Also a higher 400cd/m2, which is great.
Uhh, inserting frames that aren't actually rendered is the definition of motion interpolation.
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#23
Mistral
...FG2421 is the first gaming monitor with a refresh rate of 120 Hz or more to use a VA (vertical alignment) LCD panel...
Friggin' thank you, Eizo. Next stop, 1440p.
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#24
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: TheHunter
Here is a PDF about this Eizo 240Hz "technology"
http://gaming.eizo.com/wp-content/uploads/file/turbo240_whitepaper.pdf
"At first, the monitor doubles the input signal from 120 frames/second to 240 frames/second. It is not creating new frames but
doubling the frames. At this point, the displayed image is the same as a common 120 Hz gaming monitor"

AKA it's not 240Hz, and this monitor is a waste of time.
Posted on Reply
#25
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: RCoon
"At first, the monitor doubles the input signal from 120 frames/second to 240 frames/second. It is not creating new frames but
doubling the frames. At this point, the displayed image is the same as a common 120 Hz gaming monitor"

AKA it's not 240Hz, and this monitor is a waste of time.
It's still a 120Hz VA monitor.
Posted on Reply
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