Thursday, November 14th 2013

Microsoft Unveils state-of-the-art Cybercrime Center

Microsoft Corp. on Thursday announced the opening of the Microsoft Cybercrime Center, a center of excellence for advancing the global fight against cybercrime. The Cybercrime Center combines Microsoft's legal and technical expertise as well as cutting-edge tools and technology with cross-industry expertise, marking a new era in effectively fighting crime on the Internet.

Each year, cybercrime takes a personal and financial toll on millions of consumers around the globe. The Cybercrime Center will tackle online crimes, including those associated with malware, botnets, intellectual property theft and technology-facilitated child exploitation. The work done at the Cybercrime Center will help ensure that people worldwide can use their computing devices and services with confidence.

"The Microsoft Cybercrime Center is where our experts come together with customers and partners to focus on one thing: keeping people safe online," said David Finn, associate general counsel of the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit. "By combining sophisticated tools and technology with the right skills and new perspectives, we can make the Internet safer for everyone."

The Cybercrime Center is located on Microsoft's campus in Redmond, Wash. The secured facility houses groundbreaking Microsoft technologies that allow the team to visualize and identify global cyberthreats developing in real time, including SitePrint, which allows the mapping of online organized crime networks; PhotoDNA, a leading anti-child-pornography technology; cyberforensics, a new investigative capability that detects global cybercrime, including online fraud and identity theft; and cyberthreat intelligence from Microsoft's botnet takedown operations.

The Cybercrime Center includes a separate and secure location for third-party partners, allowing cybersecurity experts from around the world to work in the facility with Microsoft's experts for an indefinite period of time. The dedicated space enriches partnerships across industry, academia, law enforcement and customers - critical partners in the fight against cybercrime. With nearly 100 attorneys, investigators, technical experts and forensic analysts based around the world, the Microsoft Cybercrime Center is well positioned to make it safer for people online worldwide.

"In the fight against cybercrime the public sector significantly benefits from private sector expertise, such as provided by Microsoft," said Noboru Nakatani, executive director of the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation. "The security community needs to build on its coordinated responses to keep pace with today's cybercriminals. The Microsoft Cybercrime Center will be an important hub in accomplishing that task more effectively and proactively."
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34 Comments on Microsoft Unveils state-of-the-art Cybercrime Center

#1
HopelesslyFaithful
Hold on....where did my pocket Constitution and Declaration of Independence go.....might as well shred/burn it after what has happened in the last 10-20 years -_-

Oh where oh where have my natural born rights have gone? Ah that is right...the federal government has destroyed them. All for the children no matter at the cost. Long live statism. HMM or whatever your name is. You can take your statism tyranny somewhere else.
Posted on Reply
#2
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: HopelesslyFaithful
Hold on....where did my pocket Constitution and Declaration of Independence go.....might as well shred/burn it after what has happened in the last 10-20 years -_-

Oh where oh where have my natural born rights have gone? Ah that is right...the federal government has destroyed them. All for the children no matter at the cost. Long live statism. HMM or whatever your name is. You can take your statism tyranny somewhere else.
Fighting crime is bad. Got it.
Posted on Reply
#3
HopelesslyFaithful
by: Frick
Fighting crime is bad. Got it.
hardly...fighting crime while throwing out the Bill of Rights is a bad thing.

EDIT: Along with arbitrarily enforcing the law and saying you are just doing your job....pathetic.

The lawman can not be trusted....the law man is in it for his own gain...whether career or civil forfeiture. The law man is a goon of a corrupt state....countless examples exist.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacobsullum/2013/11/15/the-war-on-drugs-hits-a-new-low-with-the-police-probe-of-david-eckerts-guts/

oh those terrible evil non existent drugs. The lawman always have our best interests in mind....because we don't know whats good for ourselves. -_-
Posted on Reply
#4
Dent1
by: Prima.Vera
Except US they don't have any other jurisdicktion to enforce any laws or such...
Really? What about Gary McKinnon. He was accused of hacking NASA computers. USA tormented him through the legal system for a decade and tried to have him extradited from Britain to face trial.
Posted on Reply
#5
HopelesslyFaithful
by: Dent1
Actually paedophilia is a crime. Even if you haven't actually molested a under age person you can still be charged for paedophilia. For example if you are taking indecent under age images or even download indecent images of children you could be put on a database and arrested as a paedophile. Even if you didn't physically touch the "victim".




Really? What about Gary McKinnon. He was accused of hacking NASA computers. USA tormented him legally for a decade and tried to have him extradited from Britain to face trial.
You say "legally" but it wasn't legal. They claim it was legal but once again....Founding documents+shredder=today's USA
Posted on Reply
#6
Dent1
by: HopelesslyFaithful
You say "legally" but it wasn't legal. They claim it was legal but once again....Founding documents+shredder=today's USA
When I say legally. I don't mean right/wrong.

I mean USA pursued him through the legal system or court system. I have edited my post.


I agree there was no law to justify any extradition.
Posted on Reply
#7
HopelesslyFaithful
by: Dent1
When I say legally. I don't mean right/wrong.

I mean USA pursued him through the legal system or court system. I have edited my post.


I agree there was no law to justify any extradition.
Due process and right to a fair trial were thrown out....so much for that natural born right aye?
Posted on Reply
#9
erocker
Um.. The disturbing and disgusting off topic conversation will cease.

Stick to the topic.

Post in a civil and preferably tasteful manner.

We are keeping an eye on some of you. :wtf:
Posted on Reply