Tuesday, January 14th 2014

iBUYPOWER Debuts Coin Mining Systems

Imagine a machine that went to work for you each day and earned you a paycheck, while you relaxed in front of the television. The IBUYPOWER GPU coin mining systems powered by AMD's Radeon HD 290X graphics cards do just that.

Coin mining is taking the world by storm. By crunching data to help support the currency ecosystem, consumers can earn Litecoins, Dogecoins and Lottocoins, among many others. Of course, with all that compute power on tap, you'll be able to crunch through general compute tasks faster than ever.

"iBUYPOWER prides itself for being on the edge of technology, and as the world changes, we want to be at the forefront," said Darren Su, VP and Co-founder of IBUYPOWER. "Coin mining and high-compute systems are one of the few new areas that we have interest in. We're thrilled to be part of revolutions, and crypto-currencies are definitely on the hot-list."

With high-demand on Radeon compute processing, iBUYPOWER is making several configurations available for those who demand the highest density of Radeon compute performance.

See all available options on the iBUYPOWER website: http://www.ibuypower.com/Site/CoinMine
Add your own comment

26 Comments on iBUYPOWER Debuts Coin Mining Systems

#1
TheGuruStud
Expensive, but I guess noobs have a stupid tax.
Posted on Reply
#2
Dj-ElectriC
Hey people, take your wild imagination to the land of computers with 3-4 reference R9 290X cramped togather, working at 100% for 24/7

Just... just do it.
Posted on Reply
#3
TheGuruStud
by: Dj-ElectriC
Hey people, take your wide imagination to the land of computers with 3-4 reference R9 290X cramped togather, working at 100% for 24/7

Just... just do it.
Yeah, those cards will burn up with any air cooler packed together like that.

Maybe they meant to market these only around the arctic circle.
Posted on Reply
#4
Svarog
Why mine Bitcoins if you can have a normal Job with Social Contacts...
Posted on Reply
#5
Cheeseball
Crap, I thought Dogecoin was fake. LOL.
Posted on Reply
#6
xvi
A triple 290X system should, in theory and at current difficulties/exchange rates, take 77 days to pay for itself. It's a gamble. You'd have to hope that ASICs don't come out and/or they're not excessively fast, not to forget that it's a fluctuating market.

The way they space those cards though, I think it's a gamble that they don't burn themselves up before 77 days.
Posted on Reply
#7
Casecutter
If there's someone stupid enough to pay for a prebuilt system, then not factor that into their a ROI it’s seems crypto-currency miming is not something you should dive into. Is there anything extraordinary that make this a “mining machine” other than the cards?

Now I’d think a boutique builder would have the resources to monitor and check the temp they build into their set-up and enclosure. Then AMD must have ran such three stack cross-fire and determine the cooling adequate to sustain operation... But yea you wonder what kind of warranty iBUYPOWER will be providing.
Posted on Reply
#8
xvi
by: Casecutter
If there's someone stupid enough to pay an prebuilt system, then not to factor that into their a ROI it’s seems crypto-currency miming is not something you should dive into. Is there anything extraordinary that make this a “mining machine” other than the cards?
CPU speed has little to no effect. It's probably the only time you'll see Core i3 and Celerons paired with a 290X. Seeing as how manufacturers often skimp on CPU power anyways, it's not TOO different. Otherwise, it's just an as-cheap-as-possible computer that can accommodate a lot of GPUs. iBUYPOWER achieves this by charging relatively high prices for cheap parts.
Now I’d think a boutique builder would have the resources to monitor and check the temp they build into their set-up and enclosure. Then AMD must have ran such three stack cross-fire and determine the cooling adequate to sustain operation... But yea you wonder what kind of warranty iBUYPOWER will be providing.
I think it's slightly ridiculous to buy a mining machine through a manufacturer. Most mining machines have their components reduced down to bare minimum.
Step 1, find the cheapest motherboard with the most PCI-e slots.
Step 2, find the cheapest, lowest power processor that works with that mobo.
Step 3, load it up with as many cards as possible.
Step 4, hack up a plastic storage box to hold all the parts.
Posted on Reply
#9
Casecutter
by: xvi
I think it's slightly ridiculous to buy a mining machine through a manufacturer. Most mining machines have their components reduced down to bare minimum.
No arguement on that although I was surpised after looking at it>

Just looking at about the lowest cost for a single 280X Intel system iBuy price is $1162, while figure the card is worth $300 MSRP. Means you’re paying $862 for what amounts to a liquid cooled i3-4130, Gigabyte GA-Z87-HD3, 8Gb of ADATA XPG V2 DDR3-1866 Memory (free upgrade), 850 Watt LEPA G850-MAS 80 PLUS Gold PSU (free upgrade), 1TB HDD, DVD drive all in the NZXT Source 210 Mid-tower. Those parts are probably worth in the “open market” figure about $700. So included the card at $300, Win7 64-bit COD (figure another $80) along with a neat gaming mouse/keyboard, and free “Grid” Game for the i3 processor. Not that you need that but free stuff is nice.

It that translates to less that $100 to build and box it, but then there’s shipping. I can’t see at this point but that perhaps another $30-50 ground, it would appear it would be first-second week of February before it arrives. Better pricing than I would’ve guessed, while supposedly a 3 Year Standard Warranty Service whatever that provides? Honestly a better Gaming machine build than for mining. Like you said just minimal components in a plastic bin give the best give the best ROI.
Posted on Reply
#10
dwade
These are also the same peeps Valve is trying to ally with for Steam Machines. Lol. #fail
Posted on Reply
#11
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Svarog
Why mine Bitcoins if you can have a normal Job with Social Contacts...
The mining runs itself. You can have a job with people and everything while the computers hack away at home.
Posted on Reply
#12
TheGuruStud
by: Casecutter
No arguement on that although I was surpised after looking at it>

Just looking at about the lowest cost for a single 280X Intel system iBuy price is $1162, while figure the card is worth $300 MSRP. Means you’re paying $862 for what amounts a liquid cooled i3-4130, Gigabyte GA-Z87-HD3, 8Gb of ADATA XPG V2 DDR3-1866 Memory, 850 Watt LEPA G850-MAS 80 PLUS Gold PSU (free upgrade), 1TB HDD, DVD drive all in the NZXT Source 210 Mid-tower. Those part are probably worth in the “open market” figure $700. So included the card at $300, Win7 64-bit COD (figure another $80) and neat gaming mouse and keyboard and free “Grid” Game for the i3 processor. It that translates to less that $100 to build and box it, but then there’s shipping. I can’t see at this point but that perhaps another $30-50 ground, it would appear it would be first-second week of February before it arrives. Better pricing than I would’ve guessed, while supposedly a 3 Year Standard Warranty Service whatever that provides?
I have four 7870s, sabertooth, sempron, 8 gigs, open bench case and 1000 watt seasonic unit for barely more than that 280x rig lol.
Posted on Reply
#13
Casecutter
by: TheGuruStud
I have four 7870s, sabertooth, sempron, 8 gigs, open bench case and 1000 watt seasonic unit for barely more than that 280x rig lol.
Exactly... not going make money quickly buying from any boutique builder, I was just surprised their pricing wasn't worse.
Posted on Reply
#14
The Von Matrices
Do they provide the software and the tuning for maximum efficiency? You can get the hardware and install it pretty easily; it's configuring the mining software and setting optimal parameters that is the difficult part.
Posted on Reply
#15
RyneSmith
by: The Von Matrices
Do they provide the software and the tuning for maximum efficiency? You can get the hardware and install it pretty easily; it's configuring the mining software and setting optimal parameters that is the difficult part.
I can't imagine them doing that, but if they did I could see why they are charging so much. That being said configuring the stuff to mine isn't really that difficult, there are plenty of youtube videos. What's the difficult time consuming part is optimizing your card/cards individually. I got one of my 280xs to hash around 740 average and then my other one I messed with for hours and it won't go above 720 and it's the same card.

To be honest though in the end I wouldn't buy a prebuilt miner or computer to begin with.
Posted on Reply
#16
EpicShweetness
So that's were the "Hawaii" chips disappeared to....
Posted on Reply
#17
lilhasselhoffer
Scratching my head here. If you're spending this much money, why not buy an ASIC based miner?

What people are being charged for is a stack of GPUs. You can do that yourself, for a good deal cheaper. Better yet, buy one of the ASIC only miners, designed to run 24/7 without generating enough heat to warm two rooms. The option out there are great, but I feel this is a PR stunt more than a product release.
Posted on Reply
#18
TheGuruStud
by: lilhasselhoffer
Scratching my head here. If you're spending this much money, why not buy an ASIC based miner?

What people are being charged for is a stack of GPUs. You can do that yourself, for a good deal cheaper. Better yet, buy one of the ASIC only miners, designed to run 24/7 without generating enough heat to warm two rooms. The option out there are great, but I feel this is a PR stunt more than a product release.
You have a point, but ASICs are still a no show. Sure, you can preorder (OOS instantly the last time I checked), but there was still no ETA. That doesn't instill confidence.
Posted on Reply
#19
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Word is that most gaming PC OEMs may launch such mining rigs. Origin PC must be kicking itself for throwing a public hissy fit over AMD Radeon. Now even if it wants to bring Radeon back to its options, I doubt AMD will give it special pricing.
Posted on Reply
#20
xvi
by: The Von Matrices
Do they provide the software and the tuning for maximum efficiency? You can get the hardware and install it pretty easily; it's configuring the mining software and setting optimal parameters that is the difficult part.
When poking through the config options, it seemed implied that they didn't even give you a copy of cgminer with it. It's just a computer with Win7 and up to three GPUs.
Posted on Reply
#21
Behemot
This is going to melt. I have currently problem keeping 7970+space+58x0+58x0 under 90 °C in space where are other rigs and server.
Posted on Reply
#22
The Von Matrices
by: Behemot
This is going to melt. I have currently problem keeping 7970+space+58x0+58x0 under 90 °C in space where are other rigs and server.
Fortunately the 290 series the company advertises can't melt because it will just reach 95°C and then clock down until temperature is stable. However, if you look at the website, the company promises a certain hashrate for each model, and if the cards are thermally limited and not running at full clock speed, then they won't provide the hashing power the company promises .
Posted on Reply
#23
RyneSmith
by: lilhasselhoffer
Scratching my head here. If you're spending this much money, why not buy an ASIC based miner?

What people are being charged for is a stack of GPUs. You can do that yourself, for a good deal cheaper. Better yet, buy one of the ASIC only miners, designed to run 24/7 without generating enough heat to warm two rooms. The option out there are great, but I feel this is a PR stunt more than a product release.
At this point in time buying an ASIC miner, in my opinion, really isn't a great idea. There have been orders out there for them for a few months now and people are waiting to get theirs.

By the time anyone wanted just coming into mining could get an ASIC that was worth the money the bitcoin market will be flooded with ASICs

Best thing to get into is scrypt mining, not sha, which is GPU based.... but not for too much longer
Posted on Reply
#24
The Von Matrices
by: RyneSmith
At this point in time buying an ASIC miner, in my opinion, really isn't a great idea. There have been orders out there for them for a few months now and people are waiting to get theirs.

By the time anyone wanted just coming into mining could get an ASIC that was worth the money the bitcoin market will be flooded with ASICs

Best thing to get into is scrypt mining, not sha, which is GPU based.... but not for too much longer
I think you're slightly confused. The system builder is not targeting Bitcoin. There are two separate situations:

For SHA2-256/Bitcoin, ASICs have been around for almost a year. No one is or should be using GPUs to mine them anymore. The system builder is not targeting this market.

For scrypt/Litecoin, ASICs are not available, and there are no definitive plans for them. It's even questionable whether scrypt ASICs can make significant gains over GPUs due to the complexity of the algorithm. This is the market the builder is targeting, and it is not one that will be obsolete any time soon.
Posted on Reply
#25
Casecutter
by: btarunr
Word is that most gaming PC OEMs may launch such mining rigs. Origin PC must be kicking itself for throwing a public hissy fit over AMD Radeon. Now even if it wants to bring Radeon back to its options, I doubt AMD will give it special pricing.
Yea I remember having a contentious debate regarding that ("Tier 0" debacle) from one of your news posting? However, now I'm going back trying to find that discussion and it's seems to have disappeared from techpowerup... Am I mistaken? Checking my posts and searching the web and nothing of that from techpowerup in the first week or so in October? Everyone else has history but it appears to have been stricken from the record here? :confused:
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment