Tuesday, March 18th 2014

Crucial Announces the M550 Series SSDs

Crucial announced its M550 series of performance SSDs, succeeding its existing M500 series. Built in 7 mm-thick 2.5-inch SATA, mSATA, and M.2 form-factors, the M550 series offers higher sequential transfer rates, and comes in higher capacities near existing price-points, over its predecessor. It also introduces a handful new features, such as NWA (native write acceleration), RAIN (redundant array of independent NAND), adaptive thermal protection (ATP), and hardware encryption. The drives appear to be based on a Marvell-made controller platform, with Micron-made MLC NAND flash. The mSATA 6 Gb/s and M.2 models come in capacities of 128 GB, 256 GB, and 512 GB; while the 2.5-inch SATA 6 Gb/s models include 1 TB capacity. The drives offer sequential reads as high as 550 MB/s, with up to 500 MB/s of sequential writes. They're backed by 3-year warranties, and should eventually replace the M500 series from their existing price points.
Add your own comment

10 Comments on Crucial Announces the M550 Series SSDs

#2
urza26
by: ZetZet
When.
They're already available in the NL, for as much as € 425 for the 1TB version, which sounds like a sweet deal to me.
Posted on Reply
#3
Svarog
by: urza26
They're already available in the NL, for as much as € 425 for the 1TB version, which sounds like a sweet deal to me.
That's a steal if you ask me.
Posted on Reply
#4
xaira
i dont get m.2 ssds, msata is so neat, everything should just use msata if it needs a small ssd, yes m.2 is faster, but why couldnt it have kept the same height as msata
Posted on Reply
#5
zinfinion
by: xaira
i dont get m.2 ssds, msata is so neat, everything should just use msata if it needs a small ssd, yes m.2 is faster, but why couldnt it have kept the same height as msata
mSATA has a single form factor. M.2 has multiple form factors which gives manufacturers/integrators more flexibility.

The smallest form factor of M.2 is actually quite a bit smaller than mSATA in all dimensions (height/width/depth), so if physical size is a concern, then M.2 is actually the superior option.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6293/ngff-ssds-putting-an-end-to-proprietary-ultrabook-ssd-form-factors
Posted on Reply
#6
Jorge
The real performance gains are in PCIe SSDs.
Posted on Reply
#9
Hood
by: buggalugs
I'm in the market for a 1TB SSD, Looking at the M500 or EVO but now I have another option.
Looks like the TB war has begun, prices can only go down. I'm curious about how you plan to use that much SSD space. I use less than 30 GB on my 128 boot drive with all programs installed (games are installed on another 128 SSD). Unless I wanted to install a ton of large games, I would only be using the 1 TB SSD for storage, which seems like a waste of money. Sweet rig you built, by the way, very similar to what I'd build if I didn't already have a decent Ivy system. But if I had your system and $500 to blow, I'd be looking at a 780 or 780 Ti before I made the move to all SSD storage.
Posted on Reply
#10
urza26
by: Hood
Looks like the TB war has begun, prices can only go down. I'm curious about how you plan to use that much SSD space. I use less than 30 GB on my 128 boot drive with all programs installed (games are installed on another 128 SSD). Unless I wanted to install a ton of large games, I would only be using the 1 TB SSD for storage, which seems like a waste of money. Sweet rig you built, by the way, very similar to what I'd build if I didn't already have a decent Ivy system. But if I had your system and $500 to blow, I'd be looking at a 780 or 780 Ti before I made the move to all SSD storage.
I'm glad I got a 512GB SSD, my games folder is already 289GB, add to that things like Photoshop, Unity, Visual Studio, etc. and you certainly need that much space.
Posted on Reply