Tuesday, March 18th 2014

Zotac Announces GeForce GTX 750 Ti Thunderbolt Graphics Card

Zotac announced the GeForce GTX 750 Ti Thunderbolt graphics card. Exclusive to the Greater China region, the card is a typical mid-range graphics card for its target market, featuring a meaty cooler, strong VRM, and an overall product design that looks a couple of notches above its class. It's a typical dual-slot, full-height PCI-Express 3.0 x16 card, and has nothing to do with Thunderbolt (the interface). The card features a sexy new cooling solution that hasn't made its way to Western markets yet. It features a pair of 90 mm hybrid impellers, which ventilate a large aluminium fin stack heatsink, covered by a groovy aluminium shroud. Under the hood is a custom design PCB with a 4-phase VRM. It offers factory overclocked speeds of 1229 MHz core (vs. 1020 MHz reference), 1320 MHz GPU Boost (vs. 1085 MHz reference), and 6.00 GHz memory (vs. 5400 MHz reference), making it the highest clocked GTX 750 Ti in existence. It's expected to be priced at 1,199 RMB (US $194).

Source: Hermitage Akihabara
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11 Comments on Zotac Announces GeForce GTX 750 Ti Thunderbolt Graphics Card

#1
Assimilator
Those are some pretty crazy core speeds!
Posted on Reply
#2
Dj-ElectriC
200$... like i said before, throwing everything a GTX 750 Ti represent straight outta the window.
Posted on Reply
#3
raschmidt
by: Dj-ElectriC
200$... like i said before, throwing everything a GTX 750 Ti represent straight outta the window.
unfortunately that's about normal pricing for cards over here. Most PC components are the same price as the US but for whatever reason video cards are 33-50% more expensive. Cheapest GTX 760 will run around 1800 rmb/$300. SSD's seem to be a bit pricier here too :(
Posted on Reply
#4
mroofie
China only :(

Please come to South Africa :'(
Posted on Reply
#5
micropage7
the fans? i dunno
it just feel duhh for long term, i prefer groove blades
Posted on Reply
#6
mroofie
by: btarunr
Zotac announced the GeForce GTX 750 Ti Thunderbolt graphics card. Exclusive to the Greater China region, the card is a typical mid-range graphics card for its target market, featuring a meaty cooler, strong VRM, and an overall product design that looks a couple of notches above its class. It's a typical dual-slot, full-height PCI-Express 3.0 x16 card, and has nothing to do with Thunderbolt (the interface). The card features a sexy new cooling solution that hasn't made its way to Western markets yet. It features a pair of 90 mm hybrid impellers, which ventilate a large aluminium fin stack heatsink, covered by a groovy aluminium shroud. Under the hood is a custom design PCB with a 4-phase VRM. It offers factory overclocked speeds of 1229 MHz core (vs. 1020 MHz reference), 1320 MHz GPU Boost (vs. 1085 MHz reference), and 6.00 GHz memory (vs. 5400 MHz reference), making it the highest clocked GTX 750 Ti in existence. It's expected to be priced at 1,199 RMB (US $194).



Source: Hermitage Akihabara
Does it require a 6-pin connector ?
Posted on Reply
#7
mroofie
by: micropage7
the fans? i dunno
it just feel duhh for long term, i prefer groove blades
ahhh ?? dafuq lol
Posted on Reply
#8
Hilux SSRG
by: Assimilator
Those are some pretty crazy core speeds!
I agree, those are some amazing overclocks on gpu and memory. I really wish it was made available in North America. The shroud, heatsink, and fans look great too.
Posted on Reply
#9
SimpleTECH
by: mroofie
Does it require a 6-pin connector ?
Yes.

From the original source (translated):
[...] By implementing the unnecessary 6pin auxiliary power connector, stabilize the power supply in the reference model. [...]
Posted on Reply
#10
Hood
by: Dj-ElectriC
200$... like i said before, throwing everything a GTX 750 Ti represent straight outta the window.
Agreed, the cost and the necessity of a 6-pin PCIe connector goes completely against the card's stated mission, which is to bring decent frame rates to budget gamers who are limited to crappy OEM power supplies with no PCIe connectors and low wattage. You may as well spend an extra $50 on the 760 if your PSU can handle it, it performs 50% better.
Posted on Reply
#11
Assimilator
by: Hood
Agreed, the cost and the necessity of a 6-pin PCIe connector goes completely against the card's stated mission, which is to bring decent frame rates to budget gamers who are limited to crappy OEM power supplies with no PCIe connectors and low wattage. You may as well spend an extra $50 on the 760 if your PSU can handle it, it performs 50% better.
Considering the boosted core and memory speeds of this model, I'd be interested to see how close it can get to a stock GTX 760. As for why Zotac implemented such a powerful design on a low-end card... the appropriate response would be "why not"? Sometimes it's fun (and profitable) to see how far you can push components that are considered low-end.
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