Wednesday, April 16th 2014

Next-gen MSI OC Series Motherboard to Feature "Delid Die Guard"

The upcoming entries to MSI's more overclocker-oriented line of motherboards, the M-Power and X-Power OC Series, will feature an interesting new feature that could appeal to overclockers that like to de-lid (remove the IHS of) their processors, for more direct heat-transfer between the chip and cooler. Called the "Delid Die Guard," the accessory is a replacement LGA socket brace that runs its way around the die, and not the edges of the package. The thickness of the brace puts it at the exact level of the surface of the chip (much like the support braces GPUs come with), and so it prevents heavy coolers (think chunky LN2 pots) from pressing too hard against the die, potentially breaking it. The feature could debut on MSI's upcoming M-Power motherboard based on the Z97 Express chipset.


Source: Expreview
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17 Comments on Next-gen MSI OC Series Motherboard to Feature "Delid Die Guard"

#1
Arjai
Looks kinda sweet! About time somebody did this!
:D
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#3
zinfinion
The question now is whether Devil's Canyon uses solder...
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#4
jateruy
by: zinfinion
The question now is whether Devil's Canyon uses solder...
It will not, intel states that the Devil's Canyon will use better TIM, but still...it's TIM, which is still not better than something like CLU(unless they decide to come up with some alien chemistry...)
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#5
zinfinion
by: jateruy
It will not, intel states that the Devil's Canyon will use better TIM, but still...it's TIM, which is still not better than something like CLU(unless they decide to come up with some alien chemistry...)
Good to know. Should be interesting to see how much Intel manages to improve it.
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#6
Jack1n
I hope this feature spreads to MSI's mid-range motherboards as well.
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#7
20mmrain
by: jateruy
It will not, intel states that the Devil's Canyon will use better TIM, but still...it's TIM, which is still not better than something like CLU(unless they decide to come up with some alien chemistry...)
Well, people have been removing their cpu's IHS and replacing the stock TIM with Glid xtreme or AC MX-3. Then re installing the IHS for protection and getting 10c drops accross all cores.
So I would bet no matter which TIM Intel switches their current TIM out for, people will see an improvement.

The issue that really bugs me is, why would MSI still offer this option if Intel has truly fixed the problem? I can see a great deal of people using the i7 4790k on a z87 but not a i7 4770k on a Z97 board. So is the problem really fixed?
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#8
zzzaac
Awesome, now I guess the only bad thing about de-lidding is the losing of warranty, but for those who don't care about that, this sounds great.
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#9
Hood
Trust me, the problem won't be fixed with better factory TIM - the chip is still a Haswell, with the voltage regulator on-die. At best, overclockers will get a little more out of them before they hit the same wall. De-lidding will still be required to get a decent clock speed. Don't expect a miracle, the laws of physics haven't changed...
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#10
Hilux SSRG
Finally a real worthwhile feature for high end mobos. But I'm not paying $400.
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#11
Mussels
Moderprator
since the socket is clearly standard, i wonder if you could just ebay up one of these alone, and attach it to any board you want...
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#12
Hilux SSRG
by: Mussels
since the socket is clearly standard, i wonder if you could just ebay up one of these alone, and attach it to any board you want...
Did not consider but definitely a great idea.
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#13
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
by: Hood
Trust me, the problem won't be fixed with better factory TIM - the chip is still a Haswell, with the voltage regulator on-die. At best, overclockers will get a little more out of them before they hit the same wall. De-lidding will still be required to get a decent clock speed. Don't expect a miracle, the laws of physics haven't changed...
Overclocking ability of Haswell has more to do with the silicon quality of the chips, rather then the iVR.

Haswell overclocks pretty well if you have a good chip and overclock correctly.
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#14
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Huh. Interesting idea, that one. I wonder how many people will actually use it though.
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#15
TheBrainyOne
I read somewhere that Haswell's heat problems have to do with the distance between the die and the IHS, not the the TIM itself.

Anyway, I wish someone would try running the stock Intel Cooler with a delidded chip. I bet it's gonna be cool.
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#16
a_ump
by: TheBrainyOne
I read somewhere that Haswell's heat problems have to do with the distance between the die and the IHS, not the the TIM itself.

Anyway, I wish someone would try running the stock Intel Cooler with a delidded chip. I bet it's gonna be cool.
Yeah makes one wonder just how much intel slacks on purpose anymore to show performance gains with the following tick/tock. So i seem to have missed a class, i thought all die's were different depths at a very precise measurement such as 1/10th cm difference in height? or are all die heights universally the same?
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#17
bogami
That's what I long ago got me thinking there is a supplement made from a piece of still. That since I have i73770K without cover and I stuck with sticking plaster on the motherboard ! Small cheap accessory that can be delivering by all motherboard manufacturers.
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