Tuesday, June 3rd 2014

NEC Display Solutions Introduces 24-Inch UHD Display

NEC Display Solutions of America, a leading provider of commercial LCD display and projector solutions, announced today the MultiSync EA244UHD display, the company's first high-resolution 4K desktop display and the latest addition to its premium business desktop series.

The 24-inch LED-backlit display delivers a 3840 x 2160 resolution, four times the typical full HD desktop space, meaning more information can be on-screen at once. The EA244UHD also includes a wide color gamut, more than 1.07-billion displayable colors and compatibility with SpectraViewII calibration software. Corporate environments and other industries will benefit from the display's industry-leading low power consumption and fewer hazardous materials.

Designed to enhance work performance, this widescreen model features an AH-IPS panel with great viewing from any angle, touch-sensitive menu controls and complete ergonomic adjustability to fit any workspace. The LED backlighting of the EA244UHD display allows for a slimmer profile, lighter weight and increased power savings relative to 24-inch displays of the past.

"This MultiSync EA Series display gives enterprise customers a stunning 4K monitor that offers a huge desktop to improve productivity," said Art Marshall, Product Manager of Professional and Medical Displays at NEC Display Solutions. "The EA244UHD also is a testament to NEC Display Solutions' long-term commitment to environmentally friendly displays."

Among its other benefits, the display features ControlSync technology, which lets users control the settings for up to six MultiSync EA Series displays. Users are able to adjust power, brightness, volume and many other settings of the multi-monitor setup in unison through the master monitor.

The EA244UHD also offers smart sensing technology, which automatically detects work conditions to determine the proper display brightness with ambient light and human sensors. Moreover, it comes with a comprehensive input panel, including HDMI, DisplayPort, and DVI-D, to connect users to the latest peripherals and protect their technology investments.

The MultiSync EA244UHD display includes the following features:
  • 23.8-inch, 16:9 IPS panel with LED backlighting
  • 350cd/m2 brightness
  • 99.3 percent coverage of Adobe RGB and 1.07-billion displayable colors
  • 3840 x 2160 ultra-HD resolution
  • 15,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio (1000:1 typical)
  • Ergonomic adjustable stand with 130 mm height-adjust, tilt, swivel and pivot
  • 2 DisplayPort, 2 HDMI, and 2 DVI-D inputs
  • 6-ms response time
  • Integrated 3-port powered USB 3.0 hub (1 up/3 down)
  • Integrated speakers (1W x 2) and headphone jack
  • ControlSync for multi-screen setups
  • Smart sensing technology (ambient light and human sensors)
  • ECO Mode, carbon footprint meter and cost meter
  • ENERGY STAR 6.0, TCO 6.0 and TCO Edge 1.2 compliant
The MultiSync EA244UHD display ships with a 3-year limited parts and labor warranty, and will be available in June 2014 at an estimated street price of $1,349. The monitor also comes with a set-up manual, DisplayPort, power, USB 3.0 and ControlSync cables.
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7 Comments on NEC Display Solutions Introduces 24-Inch UHD Display

#1
SaltyFish
A 24 inch 4K desktop monitor so soon? Wow... that sweet, sweet pixel density. The price is kinda high but I think that's more due to the color reproduction for professional usage and less due to being such a compact 4K screen. This gets me excited though a bit conflicted. I've longed for something such as this, but I have a hard time justifying the high price premium since I only do graphics manipulation non-professionally. 6 ms seems to be pretty good for an IPS display though.
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#2
techtony
"The 24-inch LED-backlit display delivers a 3840 x 2160 resolution, four times the typical full HD desktop space, meaning more information can be on-screen at once."

While I'm sure that text will look better on a monitor with such a resolution, at 1920x1200 (my current LCD monitor's resolution) text is already as small as I want it to be. That is, the information density on my screen is at the limit of what is comfortable for me to view. To utilize the NEC's high resolution, I would need that in a larger monitor. I don't want to use my desktop monitor at a laptop distance! I think the way to go is to have multiple less expensive monitors, rather than a larger very expensive monitor, and the multi-monitor setup would give much more viewable information anyway. 2560x1600 on a 30" monitor may be what I seek as far as information density, but then the text would still be some crappy 96-ish DPI. While nice looking text is highly desirable to me, I can deal with the level of quality I have now, and be more productive with a larger screen at the same DPI. More vertical pixels please (and 16:10 please)!
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#3
Prima.Vera
by: techtony
"The 24-inch LED-backlit display delivers a 3840 x 2160 resolution, four times the typical full HD desktop space, meaning more information can be on-screen at once."

While I'm sure that text will look better on a monitor with such a resolution, at 1920x1200 (my current LCD monitor's resolution) text is already as small as I want it to be. That is, the information density on my screen is at the limit of what is comfortable for me to view. To utilize the NEC's high resolution, I would need that in a larger monitor. I don't want to use my desktop monitor at a laptop distance! I think the way to go is to have multiple less expensive monitors, rather than a larger very expensive monitor, and the multi-monitor setup would give much more viewable information anyway. 2560x1600 on a 30" monitor may be what I seek as far as information density, but then the text would still be some crappy 96-ish DPI. While nice looking text is highly desirable to me, I can deal with the level of quality I have now, and be more productive with a larger screen at the same DPI. More vertical pixels please (and 16:10 please)!
Relax. You can always set the DPI text size to 200% and have a Windows pr0n on your desktop. ;) :))
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#4
techtony
by: Prima.Vera
Relax. You can always set the DPI text size to 200% and have a Windows pr0n on your desktop. ;) :))
Increasing the size of fonts to the same size that I have now with 1920x1200 "only" gets me sharper text and not more information on a 24" screen. I can't afford such a luxurious screen that doesn't make me any bit more productive. If I get another screen like my current one, I'll have double the information in front of me to view and it will only cost me about $300. I could buy FOUR monitors for the price of the luxurious NEC above. Even if I had excess funds, I'm too practical to pop for the NEC (and I'd still need more than one, so double-whammy to the wallet, or TRIPLE even!).

I calculated the PPI of a 30" screen at 3840x2160 and it turns out to be 147 PPI. The same resolution on a 24" screen gives 196 PPI. I think I read somewhere that between 200 and 300 PPI, the need for anti-aliasing, sub-pixel rendering and such gyrations become unnecessary. If so, then in that range is the resolution I will be elated with (when it is affordable).
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#5
SaltyFish
by: techtony
More vertical pixels please (and 16:10 please)!
Definitely agree with that. CRTs topped out at 2048x1536. That's 1536 vertical pixels. Look how long it took us to hit past that with 1600 vertical pixels.

I'm also partial to the 16:10 aspect ratio. They're very hard to find nowadays outside of the professional sector and those cost a pretty penny (the 22 inch 1200p Ezio SX2262W is a good example). There are 2560x1600 monitors but they start at 30 inches and I don't have as the physical space to accommodate such. It's one of the reasons why I'm not looking into a multiple monitor setup. I'd prefer a 16:10 version of this as well, but it's still small enough (smaller still would be better, say 17 to 20 inches) and it exceeds 1536 vertical pixels so I can feel like I'm finally getting a resolution better than what I had in 2002.

by: techtony
I calculated the PPI of a 30" screen at 3840x2160 and it turns out to be 147 PPI. The same resolution on a 24" screen gives 196 PPI. I think I read somewhere that between 200 and 300 PPI, the need for anti-aliasing, sub-pixel rendering and such gyrations become unnecessary. If so, then in that range is the resolution I will be elated with (when it is affordable).
I got 185 PPI from that (SQRT(3840²+2160²)/23.8). Either way, it's close to the low end of 200 PPI. And for people whose eyes have severely rotted, it's probably enough. For everyone else, it's a very promising step.

Interesting note: At 4K resolution, 22 inches will be 200 PPI while 15 inches will be 293 PPI.
Posted on Reply
#6
hellrazor
by: techtony
"The 24-inch LED-backlit display delivers a 3840 x 2160 resolution, four times the typical full HD desktop space, meaning more information can be on-screen at once."

While I'm sure that text will look better on a monitor with such a resolution, at 1920x1200 (my current LCD monitor's resolution) text is already as small as I want it to be. That is, the information density on my screen is at the limit of what is comfortable for me to view. To utilize the NEC's high resolution, I would need that in a larger monitor. I don't want to use my desktop monitor at a laptop distance! I think the way to go is to have multiple less expensive monitors, rather than a larger very expensive monitor, and the multi-monitor setup would give much more viewable information anyway. 2560x1600 on a 30" monitor may be what I seek as far as information density, but then the text would still be some crappy 96-ish DPI. While nice looking text is highly desirable to me, I can deal with the level of quality I have now, and be more productive with a larger screen at the same DPI. More vertical pixels please (and 16:10 please)!
You could also try increasing your DM/WM/whatever's render DPI.
Posted on Reply
#7
techtony
by: SaltyFish

I'm also partial to the 16:10 aspect ratio. They're very hard to find nowadays...
Dell 1920x1200 24"($309 on sale): http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824260047

Pivots as well. It seems that 1920x1200 is making something of a come back. I bought my Acer 1920x1200 when they were being price reduced because 1080p was becoming all the rage. I paid around $300 back then, so it's somewhat interesting to see that the Dell in the link above is around that price now. I really want 1600 vertical pixels though, so:

Dell 2560x1600 30" ($1200 on sale): http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA24G1GC2214&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&PageSize=100&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&IsFeedbackTab=true#scrollFullInfo
Nixeus 2560x1600 30" ($605): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CHDHE0W/?tag=tec06d-20

by: SaltyFish
I got 185 PPI from that (SQRT(3840²+2160²)/23.8).
I must have used something like 22.8, for about an inch off gives close to the wrong number I calculated.
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