Wednesday, April 25th 2007

Dell Offers 32GB SSD on Select Latitude Models

Dell is the next big manufacturer to enter the solid-state disk arena today by offering 1.8" SanDisk UATA 5000 drives on its Latitude D420 ultra-mobile and Latitude D620 ATG semi-rugged notebooks. SanDisk's 1.8" SSD drive was first announced in early January and features patented TrueFFS flash management technology. Also of importance is the drive's MTBF of 2 million hours. The drive offers sustained read speeds of 62MB/sec and had an average access speed of 0.12 milliseconds. The drive also boosts overall system performance by 23 percent and reduced boot times by 34 percent on the D420 and D620. The SanDisk UATA 5000 is currently available as a $450 option on the D420 and a $300 option on the D620 ATG. The drive is also available direct from Dell at a price of $549.

Source: DailyTech
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13 Comments on Dell Offers 32GB SSD on Select Latitude Models

#1
shoman24v
32GB is crap. Factor in the recovery partition + operating system and you have nothing left.
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#2
ex_reven
by: Contact
thats all its for
It beats the previous models
16 gigs of ram on a PCI card...lol
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#3
ex_reven
by: Contact
it was actually only 4, and its faster than this.
My mistake
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#4
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
Yeah, it should come with a separate storage drive, if memory serves me correctly.
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#5
GJSNeptune
Maybe someday Microsoft will just sell Windows on these. :D

Would be cool if a company designed a series of these drives specifically for operating systems. Not sure what would be different though.
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#6
Misiowiec
by: shoman24v
32GB is crap. Factor in the recovery partition + operating system and you have nothing left.
Have some patience, it's still way better than it was just a few years ago. And look at that access time!

A few more years and I'm hoping they can increase the transfter rate fivefold and the storage twentyfold. I'm just dying to loose the mechanical harddrive and not have to wait for apps taking forever to load.
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#7
shoman24v
by: Misiowiec
Have some patience, it's still way better than it was just a few years ago. And look at that access time!

A few more years and I'm hoping they can increase the transfter rate fivefold and the storage twentyfold. I'm just dying to loose the mechanical harddrive and not have to wait for apps taking forever to load.
Oh, I know. But the size of the HD isn't enough.
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#8
GJSNeptune
Plus the whole HDD failure. Everything I think I hear clicking harsher than read/write, I get super paranoid. Ahhh the paranoia!
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#9
Misiowiec
by: shoman24v
Oh, I know. But the size of the HD isn't enough.
I totally agree :-) I've only got access to my work laptop for a few weeks, and that's got 50Gb... struggling all the time. If I didn't have an external USB HD I don't know what I'd do. Oh wait, I wouldn't download so much / rip so many DVDs, but that wouldn't be fun!
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#10
Misiowiec
by: GJSNeptune
Plus the whole HDD failure. Everything I think I hear clicking harsher than read/write, I get super paranoid. Ahhh the paranoia!
Yes that too. Had an IBM die on me some years ago with the 'click of death', and then my main HD (Samsung 160Gb) died about three months ago. Especially the Samsung hurt, it was probably a month since I last backed up so I lost some important stuff.

Now I have two WD HDs (250Gb for OS/apps and 500Gb for media/files), a 80Gb USB one for vital backups and I burn the occasional DVD to store someplace else. Can't be too careful with things like digital pictures which can't be replaced.
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#11
GJSNeptune
Aye. I've only used Western Digital drives, and I only order WD when I build systems for other people. I've nothing against Seagate, although I'm a bit iffy about Maxtor.

I have a 40GB drive from my prebuilt system from summer 2002. It still works fine and I'm using that for backing up important stuff, like my writing and such.

I have a 120GB drive for backing up music and storage in general. My 160GB drive is for Windows and program files.
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#12
Misiowiec
by: GJSNeptune
Aye. I've only used Western Digital drives, and I only order WD when I build systems for other people. I've nothing against Seagate, although I'm a bit iffy about Maxtor.

I have a 40GB drive from my prebuilt system from summer 2002. It still works fine and I'm using that for backing up important stuff, like my writing and such.

I have a 120GB drive for backing up music and storage in general. My 160GB drive is for Windows and program files.
Yeah, a lot of reading has brought me to the same conclusion - WD is the way to go. Seagate is good too, but Maxtor has had some issues (have two friends with crashed Maxtors). Samsungs are great usually, so I assume it was a once-off.

Hopefully I won't need swapping for the next year or two, but if I do let it be for some amazing new flash drive.
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#13
Mussels
Moderprator
samsung drives have lasted longest for me.

Oh and to the people who havent kept with the times: SSD drives are awesome because they have no moving parts. No heat, no noise, incredibly faster on the access times (upto 10x faster than a 15k RPM drive, so you can imagine what they do to normal drives) and so on.

They're damn perfect for an operating system/page file, or anything that uses lots of small files - the access time is so low, fragmentation doesnt even really matter anymore either.
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