Saturday, July 14th 2007

ASUS P5K3 Premium Utilizes 2 GB DDR3 Onboard Memory

Taipei, Taiwan, July 10, 2007 – Catering to enthusiasts who want the latest in innovations and technology, ASUS has released the new ASUS P5K3 Premium motherboard. This motherboard comes with the latest technologies and delivers a brand new innovation – the Turbo D3 Onboard Memory feature. With this cutting-edge feature, users are guaranteed DDR3 overclocking speeds of above 1500 and reduced clock cycle timings by 50% for random data access.

Guaranteed DDR3 1500 Speeds
Hot on the heels of ASUS’s Native Support for DDR3 1333, ASUS has yet again come up with another groundbreaking technology. The P5K3 Premium provides exceptional functions and utilizes Turbo D3 – superb onboard memory features that guarantee overclocking above DDR3 1500. The Turbo D3 Design includes the Perfect T-Tree Design, ASUS’s exclusive Super Memspeed Technology and the revolutionary Hyper PCB Design.

Perfect T-Tree Design
The P5K3 Premium motherboard utilizes the cutting-edge Perfect T-Tree Design to provide users with simultaneous random data access on every memory chip. What this means is that data access to each memory chip occurs at the same time, instead of conventional DDR3 Fly-by Topologies that require time to be spent waiting for one by one random data access. This reduces clock cycle timing by 50% for random data access – thereby ensuring faster memory speeds.

ASUS Press Release
P5K3 Premium Product Page
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32 Comments on ASUS P5K3 Premium Utilizes 2 GB DDR3 Onboard Memory

#1
TXcharger
so the ram is built into it? if so can you still upgrade if you wanted to?
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#2
Kursah
Doesn't sound like a bad deal. I guess we'll see what reviews find of those features. I like that ASUS is pushing for more. Might be a standard when DDR3 is affordable (realistically, considering 2 gigs cost almost as much as my build!) and this technology has decreased in price. Looks like it could be promising, but it could also just be another selling gimmick. We shall see soon enough!
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#3
mandelore
holy shit Batman!

thats awsome, but.. id still like the ability to upgrade the memory, but having all the chips utilizing simultaneous random data access will ensure this board will rock till it becomes obsolete, but the rate at which tech goes, how soon will that be?

really need a pic to see what its like
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#4
Dippyskoodlez
This is really cool.



Until a single IC dies.
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#5
HellasVagabond
No empty memory slots....Other than that its a Mobo that has just about everything.
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#7
kwchang007
they should've tried to have at least one or two more dimm slots in case someone wants to move to 4gb later. but this is still amazing, guaranteed speeds of 1500 mhz, along with simultaneous random data access. anyone know how much it costs?
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#8
Demos_sav
That sucks...2GB is enough but 1500mhz only? 1800mhz have already hit the market and they are talking for up to 1500mhz ONLY?:eek:
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#9
Dippyskoodlez
by: Demos_sav
That sucks...2GB is enough but 1500mhz only? 1800mhz have already hit the market and they are talking for up to 1500mhz ONLY?:eek:
Guaranteed, not capable. ;)

But who knows, with the new way they layed out the memory.. maybe it'll see a good performance difference.
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#10
HellasVagabond
In theory since the memory modules are build-in they should respond abit better than generic memory modules....On the other hand we see that these modules are covered with heatpipes thus the Guaranteed 1500mhz memory isnt anyplace near to what these babies SHOULD be able to do...
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#11
Dippyskoodlez
by: HellasVagabond
In theory since the memory modules are build-in they should respond abit better than generic memory modules....On the other hand we see that these modules are covered with heatpipes thus the Guaranteed 1500mhz memory isnt anyplace near to what these babies SHOULD be able to do...
But assuming asus's "technology" of re-arranging the memory modules holds true, I would bet it would effect overall attainable clocks.

however, it could be good OR bad.

Look at the brainpower PCB for instance.
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#12
TXcharger
do you really need 10ft of heatpipes???

bummer on the no extra dimm slots

and the 1500mhz? who isnt gonna o/c this? lol
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#13
zekrahminator
McLovin
And the best part is, the roller coaster of heatpipes will only cost $500 :roll: (yes I did just pull that out of thin air, but...think about it).
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#14
Dippyskoodlez
by: TXcharger
do you really need 10ft of heatpipes???

bummer on the no extra dimm slots

and the 1500mhz? who isnt gonna o/c this? lol
thats like someone with a water cooled PC.

Theres always SOMEONE that doesn't overclock it :laugh:
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#15
Mussels
Moderprator
expensive board, however - with 1500MHz ram, at 1:1 ratio you can guarantee this mobo ram combo will be a hit with those obessed with CPU clocks. Board + ram are both certified to a certain level, only the CPU is left over.
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#16
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
I kind of like it. But they will have to offer a damn good warranty with integrated memory, so to speak. I hope they use D9s as well ::laugh::
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#17
Beertintedgoggles
I've been wondering why mobo manufacturers haven't done this same thing except with slower/cheaper memory hooked up to a SATA controller so that users could use that for their pagefile, except normal everyday users will prob see a better benefit from ASUS' implementation with better system memory speeds.
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#18
Dippyskoodlez
by: Beertintedgoggles
I've been wondering why mobo manufacturers haven't done this same thing except with slower/cheaper memory hooked up to a SATA controller so that users could use that for their pagefile, except normal everyday users will prob see a better benefit from ASUS' implementation with better system memory speeds.
Ram doesn't behave like a hard drive in that you can treat it like a removable disk. (It would require a DDR/DDR2/DDR3 memory controller)

Plus, if you lose power, your pagefile goes POOF.

A hard drive does not.
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#19
Beertintedgoggles
by: Dippyskoodlez
Ram doesn't behave like a hard drive in that you can treat it like a removable disk. (It would require a DDR/DDR2/DDR3 memory controller)

Plus, if you lose power, your pagefile goes POOF.

A hard drive does not.
If it was hooked up (designed directly into the mobo itself) to the SATA controller you could it use just like any other SSD or I-RAM drive. Anything from another onboard battery to using high-speed flash memory could easily overcome the loss of power issue.
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#20
HellasVagabond
Well so far only Gigabyte has done something like that with their RAM drive........
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#21
Dippyskoodlez
by: Beertintedgoggles
If it was hooked up (designed directly into the mobo itself) to the SATA controller you could it use just like any other SSD or I-RAM drive. Anything from another onboard battery to using high-speed flash memory could easily overcome the loss of power issue.
You ain't gonna power high speed ddr2 with a watch battery :laugh:

But no, theres no way to just "hook it up" to the Sata controller.. DDR2/3 doesn't behave like that :laugh:

http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/storage/GigabyteIRAM/xilinx.jpg
The Xilinx FPGA has three primary functions: it acts as a 64-bit DDR memory controller, a SATA controller and a bridge chip between the memory and SATA controllers. The chip takes requests over the SATA bus, translates them and then sends them off to its DDR controller to write/read the data to/from memory.
http://www.anandtech.com/storage/showdoc.aspx?i=2480&p=2

Thats most definatly not cheap, and it doesn't even come with ram!
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#22
Beertintedgoggles
I'm not saying you're limited to DDR2 memory for an onboard pagefile. I'm imagining something like the I-RAM that's capable being designed with either non-volatile memory or using a battery (exactly like the I-RAM, however I think it's limited to far less than 24hrs. without external power) and integrated into the motherboard. I'm also aware that you'd need a controller in order to hook such a memory subsystem to the SATA chipset. My reason to hook it up in such a fashion is that the OS would see it as just another hard drive so that it'd be easy for any user to set their pagefile to the onboard device. This would give the advantage of having a much faster pagefile than using your HD. Would it be enough of a performance boost to warrent such an addition in price... depends on who you ask. I wouldn't think so but ASUS clearly feel they have a niche where onboard DDR3 memory is attractive despite its extra cost.
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#23
OnBoard
Boy that's cool, as long as 2GB is enough for you =) It screems for a crazybig CPU cooler, that blows air on all of that heatpipejungle :)
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#24
Dippyskoodlez
by: OnBoard
Boy that's cool, as long as 2GB is enough for you =) It screems for a crazybig CPU cooler, that blows air on all of that heatpipejungle :)
Hopefully it FITS! :p
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#25
tkpenalty
Hmm... finally I find a good use for my CNPS7700CU! (Now the Coolermaster Gemini has a proper use as well)
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