Wednesday, November 14th 2007

Thermaltake Has The World’s First and Only 1500W NVIDIA SLI Certified Power Supply

Thermaltake lifted up today its top of the line Toughpower power supply units to 1500W. Claiming that Toughpower 1500W has the highest output wattage among all SLI certified PSUs in the market, and is the only 1500W PSU in the world that’s certified for SLI, you'll receive very well made modular unit that has four independent +12V rails, is Intel ATX 12V 2.3 and EPS 2.91 compatible and has four 6pin PCI-E and four 8pin PCI-E connectors for multiple high-end video cards. The unit is cooled by a quiet and reliable 14cm ball-bearing fan. It also has Active Power Factor Correction, high efficiency of up to 87% and Over Current, Over Voltage, Under Voltage, Over Temperature, Over Power, and Short-Circuit protection.

Source: Thermaltake
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34 Comments on Thermaltake Has The World’s First and Only 1500W NVIDIA SLI Certified Power Supply

#1
HookeyStreet
Eat, sleep, game!
I take it this will be aimed at the uber rich that want Quad SLi.
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#4
mdm-adph
Someone who knows more about electricity tell me -- how does this thing run without overloading your wall socket? does it use two plugs?
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#5
Kreij
Senior Monkey Moderator
Interesting. The typical US household circuit is 120 volts and usually tied into a 15 amp breaker in the fusebox (and that usually connects to multiple outlet plugs). So the maximum wattage you can pull from the circuit it 1800 watts.

If you run this thing at peak power you better not have anything else plugged into that circuit, or you will be flipping breakers quite often. ;)
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#6
freaksavior
To infinity ... and beyond!
this is over kill. i can see 1000 and sometimes 1200 but 1500 and 1600w psu's are insane
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#7
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: Kreij
If you run this thing at peak power you better not have anything else plugged into that circuit, or you will be flipping breakers quite often. ;)
I already do that and I only have a 750w. If I have my TV, Computer, and Stereo on I can't vacuum my computer room without flipping the breaker.:shadedshu
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#8

240v x 15A here, could plug two of those things in :D
#9
Scrizz
w00t extra $1000 on electricity bill
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#10
MadCow
by: newtekie1
I already do that and I only have a 750w. If I have my TV, Computer, and Stereo on I can't vacuum my computer room without flipping the breaker.:shadedshu
I get that too sometimes, and I only have a 500W, with a PC that never uses all 500W. It's this damn old house.
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#11
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
1000W is over kill. 750W should be the max.
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#12
Yin
Just wondering if you have a computer that only requires 300w and you got this psu would your electric bill go up? (87% efficiency is good isn't it?) Sorry for the noob question.
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#13
Nothgrin
by: WarEagleAU
1000W is over kill. 750W should be the max.
I wouldnt say overkill... if you plugged in some Thermoelectric (peltier) coolers each can run up to 320 watts so just two of them is good enough for a 750 watt power supply which means you cant really plug anything else in or you will kill your ps...
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#14
Jizzler
by: Yin
Just wondering if you have a computer that only requires 300w and you got this psu would your electric bill go up? (87% efficiency is good isn't it?) Sorry for the noob question.
Peak efficiency (87%) is around 50% load, at least that's what I've seen on PS's with it listed. It could be as low as 76-80% under light or heavy loads.

300w draw is still pretty decent, but I'd get a lower wattage PS. The cost of a 550-750w 80Plus unit vs this 1500w unit could be $200! The extra efficient of a 300w draw on a 600w PS will give ya a couple bucks every months on you power bill.

This is not a bad PS if you want a C2Q and (4) 8800GTX :D
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#15
KennyT772
Buying a high wattage psu will not increase your electric bill unless The efficiency is lower than your previous unit. To figure how many watts you are pulling from you plug in numbers to this equation -> W from pc / effciency in decimal = watts from wall.

My system for example draws 300w load from the wall (thank you killawatt). Figure my gamexstream 700w gets 80% thats 300 x .80 = 240w used.

Newteckie you may have something wrong with your wiring. Most vaccumes are 2-3 amp, your pc pulls 3-4 amp at full load, stereo prolly 2 amp, and tv almost nothing. If I were you I would find out what all is on your circuit. You may have multiple rooms and possibly appliances on your breaker therefore creating an overload.
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#16
kwchang007
by: Kreij
Interesting. The typical US household circuit is 120 volts and usually tied into a 15 amp breaker in the fusebox (and that usually connects to multiple outlet plugs). So the maximum wattage you can pull from the circuit it 1800 watts.

If you run this thing at peak power you better not have anything else plugged into that circuit, or you will be flipping breakers quite often. ;)
Forgot to mention the gauge of the wiring in most US households can only handle 15-20 amps safely. Not to mention a circuit on a 20 amp breaker is expected to draw 10 amps...really should be a 50% overhead because running a breaker and wiring at full load is a horribly bad idea.
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#17
panchoman
Sold my stars!
by: KennyT772
Buying a high wattage psu will not increase your electric bill unless The efficiency is lower than your previous unit. To figure how many watts you are pulling from you plug in numbers to this equation -> W from pc / effciency in decimal = watts from wall.

My system for example draws 300w load from the wall (thank you killawatt). Figure my gamexstream 700w gets 80% thats 300 x .80 = 240w used.

Newteckie you may have something wrong with your wiring. Most vaccumes are 2-3 amp, your pc pulls 3-4 amp at full load, stereo prolly 2 amp, and tv almost nothing. If I were you I would find out what all is on your circuit. You may have multiple rooms and possibly appliances on your breaker therefore creating an overload.
agreed.

also, this psu has dual transformers doesn't it?

120A.. wow.
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#18
DRDNA
way kewl!!!!! I shorted my self 300watts by not waiting a lil longer:cry:
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#19
Kreij
Senior Monkey Moderator
by: KennyT772

Newteckie you may have something wrong with your wiring. Most vaccumes are 2-3 amp, your pc pulls 3-4 amp at full load, stereo prolly 2 amp, and tv almost nothing. If I were you I would find out what all is on your circuit. You may have multiple rooms and possibly appliances on your breaker therefore creating an overload.
When motors fire up they can draw substantially more current than when running. It's quite possible that his curcuit is capable of handling the running devices, but cant handle the initial startup current needed. Vacuums are notorious for dimming lights when you start them ;)
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#20
Nemesis881
by: DRDNA
way kewl!!!!! I shorted my self 300watts by not waiting a lil longer:cry:
I don't think it matters. You won't need a new psu until that one dies from old age lol.
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#21
KennyT772
by: kwchang007
Forgot to mention the gauge of the wiring in most US households can only handle 15-20 amps safely. Not to mention a circuit on a 20 amp breaker is expected to draw 10 amps...really should be a 50% overhead because running a breaker and wiring at full load is a horribly bad idea.
16ga wire is more than enough for 20a. I recently wired a basement with 12 and 14 gauge wire, off of a 15a breaker. Code wiring is 14ga minimum for a 15amp breaker iirc. 12ga is the norm for wiring.

http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm
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#22
jurrasstoil
1500W and it is CERTIFIED to run a SLI-Setup, I am seriously impressed like... not at all...
Quad-SLI + QuadCore... lets sum it up shortly:
4xGTX = 4x 150W
Quadcore = 130W
all the other stuff = 100W
830W... so... you could run roughly two of those systems with that useless piece of non-sense.
Posted on Reply
#23
JC316
Knows what makes you tick
by: Kreij
Interesting. The typical US household circuit is 120 volts and usually tied into a 15 amp breaker in the fusebox (and that usually connects to multiple outlet plugs). So the maximum wattage you can pull from the circuit it 1800 watts.

If you run this thing at peak power you better not have anything else plugged into that circuit, or you will be flipping breakers quite often. ;)
20 amp breaker is code now, not many have a 15 amp anymore, but still.

Edit:

No 14 wire is used on a 20A IIRC, my Dad will know, he is a master electrican.
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#24
hat
Maximum Overclocker
For those worried about the bill:
You could have upgraded to a 10KW power supply from your old 300 watt, and if anything it will lower your electric bill due to the power supply being less stressed (more efficent under less stress).
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#25
kwchang007
by: KennyT772
16ga wire is more than enough for 20a. I recently wired a basement with 12 and 14 gauge wire, off of a 15a breaker. Code wiring is 14ga minimum for a 15amp breaker iirc. 12ga is the norm for wiring.

http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm
Ah shiz sorry people don't listen to me about electricity.
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