Monday, January 7th 2008

NVIDIA Announces Hybrid SLI

NVIDIA today announced the industry’s first hybrid technology for PC platforms - Hybrid SLI - that addresses two critical issues: increasing graphics performance and reducing power consumption. NVIDIA Hybrid SLI technology will be incorporated into a wide variety of graphics and motherboard desktop and notebook products that the Company is rolling out for both AMD and Intel desktop and notebook computing platforms throughout 2008.

“From the introduction of programmable GPUs to the rapid adoption of our multi-GPU SLI technology, NVIDIA has repeatedly pioneered and innovated to solve difficult problems for the industry. We believe Hybrid SLI technology is one of the most important innovations we’ve come up with to date,” said Jen-Hsun Huang, CEO of NVIDIA. “Hybrid SLI delivers new multi-GPU technology to a large segment of the PC market, delivering consumers a level of PC graphics performance and power efficiency never before seen.”

First disclosed in June 2007, NVIDIA Hybrid SLI technology is based on the Company’s market-leading GeForce graphics processor units (GPUs) and SLI multi-GPU technology. Hybrid SLI enables NVIDIA motherboard GPUs (mGPUs) to work cooperatively with discrete NVIDIA GPUs (dGPUs) when paired in the same PC platform. Hybrid SLI provides two new technologies— GeForce Boost and HybridPower—that allow the PC to deliver graphics performance for today’s applications and games when 3D graphics horsepower is required, or transition to a lower-powered operating state when not.

For lower energy consumption and quieter PC operation, HybridPower allows the PC to switch processing from a single GPU or multiple GPUs in SLI configuration to the onboard motherboard GPU. HybridPower is most useful in situations where graphics horsepower is not required, such as high definition movie playback on a notebook platform or simple e-mail or Internet browsing on a desktop. It is also beneficial for those users who want a quiet operating state with reduced thermals and noise. For notebooks, HybridPower can also dramatically extend battery life by up to 3 hours. When a game or application is started that requires the additional 3D horsepower, the PC can automatically transition back to the discrete graphics cards and power up the 3D capabilities all transparent to the end user

For applications where 3D performance is required, GeForce Boost turbo-charges 3D operation by combining the processing power of the traditional NVIDIA GeForce-based graphics card with that of the second GPU integrated into the motherboard core logic. In media-rich applications, both GPUs work in tandem to render the combined images with the end user benefiting from the increase in performance and frame rate. For typical games and 3D applications, GeForce Boost can kick in automatically, resulting in a greatly enhanced consumer experience.

NVIDIA is the recognized market leader for GPU desktop and notebook solutions for both Intel and AMD platforms and has a full lineup of Hybrid SLI-capable graphics and motherboard products planned for 2008. New Hybrid SLI-capable products include the upcoming NVIDIA nForce 780a SLI, nForce 750a SLI, and nForce 730a media and communication processors (MCPs) for AMD CPUs, which will be released next month, as well as the new GeForce 8200—the industry’s first micro-ATX motherboard solution with an onboard Microsoft DirectX 10-compliant motherboard GPU. NVIDIA Hybrid SLI notebooks as well as desktop products designed for Intel CPUs will be available next quarter.

For more information on Hybrid SLI technologies, including GeForce Boost and HybridPower, please visit http://www.nvidia.com/object/hybrid_sli.htmlSource: NVIDIA
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13 Comments on NVIDIA Announces Hybrid SLI

#1
HaZe303
Hopefully this means I can soon use SLI on my x38 board... Hoping doubtfully.
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#2
a111087
but you can't use different GPUs like in Crossfire X?
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#3
Co_Op
HybridPower might be a very good thing if implemented properly (i.e. putting the pcie video card in sleep mode and switching to the on-board graphics... just lowering clocks doesn't cut that much power and is already available through various 3rd party utilities). You don't need a video card blowing 100+ watts for internet surfing, spreadsheets, downloading overnight or watching movies. Most people spend 25% or less of their computer time gaming and actually needing high-end/high-power graphics.
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#4
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
The higher end nVidia cards already cut the clocks and lowers the voltages when idle, so it isn't just going to be that.

It sounds like it is will two things:

1.) Disable the dedicated card when it isn't needed, reducing power usage and heat output.
2.) Use the integrated GPU in a form of SLI to boost the performance of the dedicated card.(Perhaps the integrated GPU can be used to do AA, removing that load from the primary GPU).

Either way, if implemented correctly it could be a good idea. However, there aren't many enthusiusts that will probably pick up on this as there aren't many that buy motherboards with integrated GPUs.
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#5
BvB123
by: newtekie1
The higher end nVidia cards already cut the clocks and lowers the voltages when idle, so it isn't just going to be that.
like 8800gt from 1.10 to 1.05? :banghead:
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#7
Mad-Matt
Isnt nvidia abit late to the game with this since ati(amd) have already shown the "industry’s first hybrid technology for PC platforms" before xmas ?
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#8
Mussels
Moderprator
this is more about turning off the dedicated card and switching to a weaker solution to save power, and automatically turn back on. I dont see it being able to improve performance very much (onboard cards have very little GPU power to them)
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#9
Tatty_One
Senior Moderator
by: BvB123
like 8800gt from 1.10 to 1.05? :banghead:
Well 1.05V to 0.95, 1.1 being the hardware limitation, most cards just give you 1.05V without a BIOS mod but Palit give 1.1 straight outta the box :D
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#10
a111087
by: Mad-Matt
Isnt nvidia abit late to the game with this since ati(amd) have already shown the "industry’s first hybrid technology for PC platforms" before xmas ?
yes and they will be the first to actually get it to the customers, drivers will be out in this month.
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#11
Mussels
Moderprator
i'm still curious about how its going to work. i have a spare PCI-E slot here, and i'd be fine buying an 8400GS or something to lower my 2D power use.
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#12
a111087
correct me if i'm wrong, but i think it will work only on new 7-series chipsets and stands no chance in battle against crossfire, since crossfire is expected to work with different gpu's
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#13
xfire
I heard its vista exclusive. Is that true?
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