Monday, January 21st 2008

New Intel Wolfdale Stock Cooler Pictured

The new 45nm Wolfdale Core 2 Duo E8000 CPUs have a new cooler bundled with the BOX package. As you can see below, the cooler is similar than the one found in Intel's 65nm Conroes. This move probably helps Intel trim down the manufacturing costs, but mostly comes to show one big plus of the 45nm process and that's the lower heat output.

Source: TechConnect Magazine, matbe
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34 Comments on New Intel Wolfdale Stock Cooler Pictured

#1
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
and it also looks like they've gone back to usind the old p4 style aluminium base.
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#2
niko084
by: Random Murderer
and it also looks like they've gone back to usind the old p4 style aluminium base.
Didn't even notice that change until you pointed it out.... I thought it was best to have copper base with aluminum fins, because copper displaces heat faster and aluminum dissipates it faster.

But then again if its not needed, copper is more expensive and is going up still last I knew.
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#3
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
by: niko084
Didn't even notice that change until you pointed it out.... I thought it was best to have copper base with aluminum fins, because copper displaces heat faster and aluminum dissipates it faster.

But then again if its not needed, copper is more expensive and is going up still last I knew.
and copper cost more to use in manufacturing due to it's higher melting point and it's harder than aluminium.
also, it weighs more, so shipping a bunch at one time would cost more.
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#4
niko084
by: Random Murderer
and copper cost more to use in manufacturing due to it's higher melting point and it's harder than aluminium.
also, it weighs more, so shipping a bunch at one time would cost more.
Aww didn't think of all that either.
Posted on Reply
#5
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
by: niko084
Aww didn't think of all that either.
:laugh:
i'm always thinking...
:toast:
Posted on Reply
#6
largon
by: niko084
(...) copper displaces heat faster and aluminum dissipates it faster.
:shadedshu
Not true.
There is no such thing as element-specific "heat dissipation factor".
Posted on Reply
#7
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
by: largon
:shadedshu
Not true.
There is no such thing as element-specific "heat dissipation factor".
no, but there is "thermal resistance," and copper's is lower than aluminium. so there.:p
Posted on Reply
#8
niko084
by: Random Murderer
no, but there is "thermal resistance," and copper's is lower than aluminium. so there.:p
Well in that very manner.... A material with more thermal resistance will take longer to heat up and longer to cool down because it is resistant to thermal changes, so in that matter it would take longer/shorter depending for the heat to dissipate.
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#9
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
by: niko084
Well in that very manner.... A material with more thermal resistance will take longer to heat up and longer to cool down because it is resistant to thermal changes, so in that matter it would take longer/shorter depending for the heat to dissipate.
thought this is purely theoretical and (probably) directly proportionate.
Posted on Reply
#10
niko084
by: Random Murderer
thought this is purely theoretical and (probably) directly proportionate.
Which would in reality make sense of the whole copper pipes and base with aluminum fins... The copper gets warm slowly while the aluminum fins with the fan on it stays cool to cool the heat pipes and keep them at a solid temperature.

I don't know if its anything noticeable or that really makes a decent difference, but I have read that there is a reason behind it before. Who knows.... As far as I'm concerned as long as my processor idles within 5-10 F of my room temperature I'm happy.
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#12
Esse
The HSF is tiny! I would of preferred if I didn't even get one if it meant saving some money.
E8200 @ 4.4GHz with TRUE does 40c load :D

Heres mine:
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#13
Homeless
by: Esse
The HSF is tiny! I would of preferred if I didn't even get one if it meant saving some money.
E8200 @ 4.4GHz with TRUE does 40c load :D

Heres mine:
You can buy an OEM processor, but then you don't get a nice warranty
Posted on Reply
#14
EnglishLion
by: Homeless
You can buy an OEM processor, but then you don't get a nice warranty
Who wants a warranty on a cpu? I've never returned one under warranty - in fact I've never had one fail. They have temp cut offs too, so you're unlikely to fry it. The warranty is just another piece of wasted paper!

As for the small HSF, it's to fit more applications inc sff cases. For those wishing to OC, an OEM HSF is obviously going to be better but for all other applications the std HSF is going to be fine.
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#15
DanTheBanjoman
Señor Moderator
Great logic there, you never had one fail hence you don't need warranty. I'd love to hear you repeat that when one does fail on you.
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#16
largon
by: Random Murderer
There is no such thing as element-specific "heat dissipation factor".
no, but there is "thermal resistance," and copper's is lower than aluminium. so there.
Meaning copper is superior for cooling appliances by all attributes. Except for raw material price.
Your point eludes me. :confused:
by: niko084
material with more thermal resistance will take longer to heat up and longer to cool down because it is resistant to thermal changes, so in that matter it would take longer/shorter depending for the heat to dissipate.
Not exactly.
Thermal resistance only affects how well a given material conducts heat. It alone has no impact on how long a time it takes to heat/cool a mass of an object from AºC to BºC - atleast not for low-mass/volume objects like heatsink fins.
by: niko084
copper gets warm slowly while the aluminum fins with the fan on it stays cool to cool the heat pipes and keep them at a solid temperature.
Why do the fins stay cool? And for how long?
What you're talking about is thermal capacitance (tc). Alu has much higher tc compared to copper, but for use in electronics' heatsinks higher tc has no purpose at all as the only scenario a high tc would be beneficial would be a situation where the time heat was "injected" was non-continuous. Continuous heat loads, that for example, CPUs produce causes the aluminum fins' temperature to raise to a point where it is almost on-par to that of the copper heatpipes but due to inferior heat conductivity a tempereture gradient will form between the heatpipe-fin contact point and the far-end of the fin. An all-copper heatsink would spike the temps more quickly but it would max at a lower ºC for both the cooled chip & the heatsink itself. HS with copper base&pipes+alu fins would have a slower temperature climb but both the chip&heatsink would max a few ºC higher than the one made of copper.

Infact, a material with extremely poor heat capacity and high conductivity would be an ideal heatsink material as it would heat up quickly thus making more efficient use of it's surface area. carbon nanotubes being an example of such a material. Another ideal HS material would be the opposite: an "exotic material" with insane thermal capacity that it would just absorb all the heat injected in it thus warming up very, very slowly. By "exotic material" (with insane heat capacity) I mean that such material doesn't exist.
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#17
NamesDontMatter
LMAO @ entire discussion. :roll: I hope you guys all did alright in high school physics.

@ Largon thanks for taking the time to clarify for them.
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#18
Homeless
I too have never had a processor fail, but the difference between OEM and retail is $10. OEM gives you a 90 day warranty while you get a 3 year with retail. Even if you aren't going to use the retail HSF, it's worth the extra $10 imo.
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#19
tigger
I'm the only one
Sometimes the differance is more than $10,specially in the uk.
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#20
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
The standard ones that came with the Conroe chips had so much more OC headroom with stock cooling since the heatsink was larger. This one's size scares me but since it's a fab-shrink with the processors' TDP ranging 35~55 W this should do the job for stock speed and maybe a 8% OC squeezed in.

The ones that come with the Yorkfield (QX 9650) are awesome in fact Mandelore could play with his QX9650 pretty well on stock-cooling.

This is the one (owner: Mandelore)


His stock-cooled OC spree
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#21
largon
The new Intel Extreme-series stock cooler sure is an improvement but think it would have no chance against the quad-heatpipe monstrosity that comes with higher-rated Athlon X2s.

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#22
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
^Does this come with the X2 6000+??
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#23
largon
I think the newest X2s like 6000+ are boxed but don't include a HSF of anykind.
It's the high 5_00+ series that have these. Or atleast have HAD.
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#24
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
I have a X2 5400+ (Windsor, the 2x 512KB L2 variant of the 5600+) It didn't come with this cooler. I bought it like last July.
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#25
Steevo
I have one of those with a new Allendale i just got, fortunately I had about 4 of the copper core coolers left and i used one of those with some AS.
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