Tuesday, July 1st 2008

ATI Preparing 'Super RV770' to Challenge GeForce GTX 200 Series

The RV770 is perhaps the best thing that happened to AMD in a long while. But more than AMD, it's perhaps the best thing that happened to us, the consumers. But general product launches seem to be just the tip of the ice-berg. The new PCB's designed by ATI for RV770 cards are actually running at well below the clock speed they can support and there is every reason to believe that these cards will be challenging NVIDIA's very best.

The HD4870 PCB with two 6-pin power connectors can support a maximum TDP of 225W (2x 75W from the power connectors + 75W from the PCI-Express interface). While at stock parameters, the HD4870 will not consume over 170W, it implies that with a fair bit of binning for high-performing parts, there is a serious lot of room for overclocking way beyond what the ordinary HD4870 cards can take.

ATI is binning the parts to a lowest denominator required for good yields and a level of performance that reaches or sometimes overtakes the GeForce GTX 260. But this time around, the company developed an AIB/OEM-only product codenamed "Super RV770", which will be much more powerful.

These cards will come with pre-installed water-cooling and feature an 'unlocked BIOS'. Déjà Vu? Yes, it's perhaps the same parts that went into making the Diamond HD4870 XOC Unlocked Black Edition which was released earlier. The BIOS allows manufacturers to push the GPU core speed all the way up to 950 MHz, with the memory being able to scale up to 1200 MHz (effective: 4.80 GHz). With even better cooling such as a thermo-electric couple (TEC) cooler, you might be able to push it a little further. At 1200 MHz memory, the card attains a memory bandwidth of 150 GBps.

With Diamond Multimedia already having a product in the making, expect announcements from other ATI partners such as ASUS, Sapphire, HIS and GeCube.Source: DailyTech
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56 Comments on ATI Preparing 'Super RV770' to Challenge GeForce GTX 200 Series

#2
Megasty
by: [I.R.A]_FBi
the device can make a small about of heat but due to certain factors (ex poor qulaity heat sink, poor thermal interface, low fan speed) have a high temperature.

Heat and temperature are cousins but they are not a direct corellation.

The company gives you the option of increasing teh fan, there are anvenues to do so. This cannot make one company worse than the other. If the heatskin itself was woefully inadequate now that would be a cause for concern.
The only thing is that the fan speed directly effects how much heat the heatsinks can dissipate. If you raise the speed of the fans then you increase the airflow over the heatsink & allow for more dissipation. The coolers on the cards are fine but the fan speeds are stuck at 18%. Its just too dumb for them to have done that. The fans atleast should run at 35% & kick up to 50-60% during full GPU load.
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#3
farlex85
by: [I.R.A]_FBi
http://www.fordhamprep.org/gcurran/sho/sho/lessons/lesson17.htm

see if that helps ...

what im saying is because an item has a higher temperature does not necessarily mean it has alot of heat ... all it means is the heat is being removed at a slower rate (in this case) than the oppenents card gtx260
Seems kind of semantic. I think of heat varying degrees of kinetic energy in molecules (measurement being temperature) and haven't heard it referred to explicitly as the transfer of thermal energy. I don't go to class all the time though. :laugh:

At any rate, what is important here, the amount of "heat" on a gpu or it's temperature. What will start to cause problems?
Posted on Reply
#4
Megasty
by: farlex85
Seems kind of semantic. I think of heat varying degrees of kinetic energy in molecules (measurement being temperature) and haven't heard it referred to explicitly as the transfer of thermal energy. I don't go to class all the time though. :laugh:

At any rate, what is important here, the amount of "heat" on a gpu or it's temperature. What will start to cause problems?
It is semantic & I was a physics teacher :roll:

In any case, heat destroys...heat is the root of all evil :p (when it comes to silicon) Needless to say, the only thing that can give us an idea of how much heat a GPU is producing is its temps. We try to lower the temps in any way to lengthen the lives of our GPUs. Its as simple as that & its written in stone. Lower temps = happier hardware :D
Posted on Reply
#5
imperialreign
by: Megasty
It is semantic & I was a physics teacher :roll:

In any case, heat destroys...heat is the root of all evil :p (when it comes to silicon) Needless to say, the only thing that can give us an idea of how much heat a GPU is producing is its temps. We try to lower the temps in any way to lengthen the lives of our GPUs. Its as simple as that & its written in stone. Lower temps = happier hardware :D
cooling performance is passive overclocking :toast:
Posted on Reply
#6
Mussels
Moderprator
the ATI cards only run hot because the fans dont crank up. its simple to fix it in a bios update, or even with software.

The heat output vs temperature argument does get funny, when people cnat keep up.

GPU + fan @ 15% = silent, but 100C
GPU + fan @ 35% = quiet, but 60C

its like how people called the 8800GT a hot card when it wasnt, the stock cooler was merely crap.
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