Monday, July 7th 2008

Pioneer Preparing a 400 GB Optical Disc

Pioneer is preparing what it claims to be a 16-layer optical disc. Though no information about its format have been released yet, Pioneer claims each layer of this disc can carry the same amount of data as a Blu-ray disc layer. With 16 such 25 GB layers, that comes up to a huge 400 GB capacity, enough for..err..whatever you want to do with all that space.

The disc however seems to have problems relating to each layer interfering between the surface of the disc and the one the player is trying to read from. Pioneer said it applied an array of optical and signal processing techniques to create a "16-layer optical disc that can play back high-quality signals from every layer".

Apart from having similar layer-sizes to the Blu-ray disc there are other features that make this disc format suspiciously similar to that of Blu-ray, such as the specifications of the lens. Pioneer is quick to defend saying that it's just so the player could maintain compatibility with Blu-ray discs.

Source: Register Hardware
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19 Comments on Pioneer Preparing a 400 GB Optical Disc

#1
rampage
this is all well and good, hell a 400 gig optical disc is great, but i'm having enough trouble with scratches on my cd's and dvd's, i might be a bit out of place here but i think SSD's are the way of the future, it would be cool to go buy a "blue ray" type of movie on a SSD and not have to worry about the disc getting scratched and dammaged
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#2
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
sony and the rest of the blu-ray team are working to increase the capacity of BD. they already have a 100 gig disc out for testing. companies know that quad-hd will start hitting consumers in perhaps 6-7 years and that means BD-400 discs will be necessary.
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#3
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
They simply flicked BD's tech, improvised a technique to add more layers....i feel. If Pioneer could do this, I'm sure Sony and the BD SIG can as well.
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#4
WhiteLotus
I wonder what the write speed of that thing is
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#5
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Start the burn, go on a date. Get back just in time to see the tray pop out. i.e. if there is a consumer-level PC drive in the making.
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#6
[I.R.A]_FBi
by: btarunr
Start the burn, go on a date. Get back just in time to see the tray pop out. i.e. if there is a consumer-level PC drive in the making.
In the morning after she makes breakfast?
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#7
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: [I.R.A]_FBi
In the morning after she makes breakfast?
:roll: good one.
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#8
H82LUZ73
by: rampage
this is all well and good, hell a 400 gig optical disc is great, but i'm having enough trouble with scratches on my cd's and dvd's, i might be a bit out of place here but i think SSD's are the way of the future, it would be cool to go buy a "blue ray" type of movie on a SSD and not have to worry about the disc getting scratched and dammaged
You can not scratch a Blu-ray disc by the way.
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#9
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
well you can scratch it if you decide to take a really sharp rock to it. it is however far more resistant to scratches than CDs and DVDs.
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#10
chron
by: Easy Rhino
well you can scratch it if you decide to take a really sharp rock to it. it is however far more resistant to scratches than CDs and DVDs.
my friend has a ps3, and i guess it's the ps3 that's sensitive because when we try to play the movie 'happy feet' it obviously skips. Examination of the disc shows minute scratches. Less than that of your average dvd.

:/
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#11
imperialreign
by: btarunr
They simply flicked BD's tech, improvised a technique to add more layers....i feel. If Pioneer could do this, I'm sure Sony and the BD SIG can as well.
Remember, though, Blue-Ray was originally a partnership between Pioneer and Sony; both companies helped develop the technology . . . actually, Pioneer had done the vast majority of the leg work through the early development of the technology, much like they've done with countless other forms of digital media over the last 20 years.

It's not of much concern if the technology to make and use a 400GB OD is built off of BR, as Pioneer have the technological rights to do so.

It's been surprising to me, though, that Pioneer and Sony have been able to cooperate in the BR realm for so long, as the two companies don't typically see eye-to-eye.


This example of what they're capable of, IMO, only proves to me that Pioneer is still a major player in the digital media market and will continue to help push boundaries even further.
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#12
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
by: chron
my friend has a ps3, and i guess it's the ps3 that's sensitive because when we try to play the movie 'happy feet' it obviously skips. Examination of the disc shows minute scratches. Less than that of your average dvd.

:/
wierd cause BD use a far more scratch resistant coating.
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#13
Darkrealms
Hadn't Toshiba claimed it would be possible to get 500gb out of a HD DVD. I know they were working on it before the whole project went to hell. Did Pioneer pickup where Toshiba left off?
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#15
adrianx
so wait and see

I my country I don't see any blanc double side or double layer disc to buy. ... the local authority steel demand that all the fiscal data to be send to paper or floppy disk.
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#16
Mussels
Moderprator
by: H82LUZ73
You can not scratch a Blu-ray disc by the way.
yes, yes you can.

BD uses a scratch resistant coating, but because of the higher data density smaller scratches have far more of an effect. 4GB - 25GB, means that a scratch 1/5th the size will take out the same amount of data.
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#17
KieranD
sounds good for the storage industry, i mean like offices and movie makers and government.

i personally would rather back up my hard drive to a disk rather than other hard drive

OHHHH some company even still use huge magnetic tapes to back up

that holographic disk i heard bout in early 2007 sounds like the next big thing to me
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#18
imperialreign
by: Mussels
yes, yes you can.

BD uses a scratch resistant coating, but because of the higher data density smaller scratches have far more of an effect. 4GB - 25GB, means that a scratch 1/5th the size will take out the same amount of data.
does BR use similar methods of data correction that CDs do? A CD without data correction is extremelly susceptible to even the slightest scratch.
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#19
Mussels
Moderprator
by: imperialreign
does BR use similar methods of data correction that CDs do? A CD without data correction is extremelly susceptible to even the slightest scratch.
i assume they'd have something there, otherwise the higher density would make them far too susceptible to data loss. as people have already said, even a slight scratch ends up with stuttering on BR movies.
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