Friday, September 5th 2008

Engineers at IBM Set a New Solid-State Drive Speed Record

Engineers and researchers at the IBM Hursley development lab in England and the Almaden Research Center in California have demonstrated groundbreaking performance results that outperform the world's fastest disk storage solution by over 250 percent. IBM has demonstrated, for the first time, the game-changing impact solid-state technologies can have on how businesses and individuals manage and access information.

The results were achieved using Flash solid-state technology coupled with IBM's industry leading, highly scalable storage virtualization technology. Under the codename "Project Quicksilver," IBM achieved groundbreaking results in transferring data at a sustained rate of over one million Input/Output (I/O) per second -- with a response time of under one millisecond (ms). Compared to the fastest industry benchmarked disk system Quicksilver improved performance by 250 percent at less than 1/20th the response time, took up 1/5th the floor space and required only 55 percent of the power and cooling.

Performance improvements of this magnitude can have profound implications for business, allowing 2-3 times the work to complete in a given timeframe for classic workloads, enabling tremendous efficiency for time sensitive applications like reservations systems, and financial program trading systems, and creating opportunity for entirely new insights in information warehouses and analytic solutions.

IBM is driving a comprehensive approach to leverage solid state storage, which is an emerging enterprise technology that has no moving parts, thus eliminating many of the access delays associated with electro-mechanical disks. Technology leadership for IBM is rooted in 15 consecutive years of U.S. patent leadership, unmatched by any competitor in the world today. IBM continues to develop, integrate and optimize solid state storage into the broad range of applications, middleware, operating systems and hardware in their storage and server offerings, well beyond a simple replacement of disk.

As an example, IBM's first to-market implementation of solid-state drives for select IBM BladeCenter servers has been available since June of 2007, enabling customers to experience enhanced reliability. The ongoing cross-IBM initiative promises significant energy savings and dramatic I/O performance improvements. Additionally, by deploying automated management capabilities, IBM is creating fully integrated information infrastructures that can deliver significant customer benefit.

"The ultimate benefits of solid state will require software, management and systems capabilities -- with IBM being uniquely positioned, with its deep research and development capabilities and broad product and services experience, to unlock that potential," said Andy Monshaw, General Manager, IBM System Storage. "IBM is integrating this technology with systems and applications so that companies can achieve real business value from solid-state disk. Quicksilver is a significant step forward in this comprehensive systems strategy. This is not about replacing today's hard disk drive with a new form factor, this is about having a complete, end-to-end systems approach -- and that's not something EMC, HP or Sun can match."

Research Innovation with Solid-State Technology
IBM has a decades-long proven track record in system innovation including the memory chip, the hard disk drive and the relational database. As the leader in solutions which blend tiers of storage, and 15 consecutive years of U.S. patent leadership and innovation, IBM Research has developed breakthrough data center provisioning technology that automatically understands and balances the utilization of diverse storage components in the information infrastructure, including solid-state storage. Additionally, to get the most value from high performance system resources in storage, IBM Research patented key technologies that help maintain required quality-of-service for higher priority applications.

Quicksilver is part of IBM's focus on leveraging new and emerging systems technologies to deliver advanced data center capabilities and business value to customers. IBM is committed to develop solid state storage to create real-world uses across a broad range of applications, middleware, and systems offerings.Source: IBM
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10 Comments on Engineers at IBM Set a New Solid-State Drive Speed Record

#1
Mussels
Moderprator
i swear i saw this on TPU news a few days ago...
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#2
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
That was when we had initial reports of testing, this one is with IBM showing off its might to the industry....in the form of a PR :)

Project QuickSilver is meh though, because Intel is yet to test a complex array using its fastest SLC SSDs.
Posted on Reply
#3
Mussels
Moderprator
ah thanks for clarifying. it was either a repeat or i was seeing the future :P
Posted on Reply
#4
Wile E
Power User
by: Mussels
ah thanks for clarifying. it was either a repeat or i was seeing the future :P
Glitch in the Matrix.
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#5
candle_86
very nice, now when can we afford it?

Honestly in 50 years we will be living in Star Trek if they keep this up.

Though any word on the optical computer that IBM was working on yet?
Posted on Reply
#6
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: candle_86
very nice, now when can we afford it?
Your friendly neighbourhood data-center might be able to.
Posted on Reply
#7
jbunch07
by: Wile E
Glitch in the Matrix.
oh noes....the agents....


but seriously, Way to go IBM, I keep telling my self next time I build a computer im going to use ssd.
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#8
truehighroller1
by: jbunch07
oh noes....the agents....


but seriously, Way to go IBM, I keep telling my self next time I build a computer im going to use ssd.
I'm not until they are close to $150 for a 300Gb Fast one. I am getting a Velociraptor next week on pay day and doing away with my three drive raid setup.
Posted on Reply
#9
hacker111
by: Mussels
i swear i saw this on TPU news a few days ago...
yea, i just went there and there wasnt an article on it..:laugh:

by: candle_86
very nice, now when can we afford it?

Honestly in 50 years we will be living in Star Trek if they keep this up.

Though any word on the optical computer that IBM was working on yet?
Agreed! whats the price on this thing?:banghead:
Posted on Reply
#10
PCpraiser100
Despite the fact that SSDs are still finding a light out of the tunnel for a consumer's interest, these races for the fastest SSD are probably going to distract the industry when it comes to pricing. Basically, its out with the old and into the new. When companies fail producing the products that was supposed to be the best of its kind, they lower it down hoping they could still have a chance with us. Or, if they are new contendors of the technololgy race, they will just ditch the product that they got behind with and move on, making the prices of the former SSDs even lower. Think about some of the most unknown companies that are contendors with the SSD race and check the prices of their SSDs as time goes on, I'm pretty you'll get what I mean as time goes on.
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