Saturday, October 18th 2008

Red Sea LGA-1366 Version Released

The entry of the LGA-1366 socket Intel Core i7 processors puts a whole section of the industry into business: compatible motherboards, compliant memory kits, and CPU coolers to name some. Overclocker 3 PC Cooler, a relatively unknown brand to the west, that concentrates on Asian markets, has released an LGA-1366 compatible variant of the Red Sea cooler.

While not meant to be an extreme-level cooler, the Red Sea is intended to be an inexpensive stock-cooler replacement, with some overclocking thrown in. The cooler consists of a contact block, in which two heatpipes make direct contact with the CPU. The heatpipes go through 44 aluminum fins. These fins are dimpled, to effectively increase their surface-area of dissipation. The cooler uses push-clip mechanism for motherboard retention.


Source: Expreview
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30 Comments on Red Sea LGA-1366 Version Released

#1
Arrakis+9
nice replacement for a stock cooler but push pins... eh:slap:
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#2
SimFreak47
I was wondering when coolers would come out! Cool!

Pun intended!
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#3
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
*cough*Rosewill *cough* :)
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#4
SimFreak47
Rosewill coolers are nice IMO. Their power supplies are another story though..
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#6
SimFreak47
Indeed! Why can't they be more like AMD's cooling system?
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#7
theonetruewill
by: ShadowFold
Push pin = fail
They're a hell of a lot easier to install than ones requiring a backplate.
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#8
ShadowFold
by: theonetruewill
They're a hell of a lot easier to install than ones requiring a backplate.
Not in my experience....
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#9
theonetruewill
by: ShadowFold
Not in my experience....
Your turn the clips to take them out and oull, or push the piuns down to put it in. Estimated time taken for reinstallation of a cooler: 1-2 minutes. With a backplate you're looking at a whole lot longer...
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#10
bretts31344
Push pin coolers are such a pain in my opinion. It differs in each case, but it seems impossible to get all four pins in without feeling like the motherboard might snap at any moment.
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#11
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
You have the convenience of not having to rip your whole box apart (take the motherboard out) with push-pins.
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#12
SimFreak47
That is one nice thing I like about the Push Pin design.
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#13
Kursah
I haven't had any issues with push pins on any coolers, sure some are a pain and the board can flex...I find the hardest ones to seat are stock intel coolers, so if you don't have an issue with those...aftermarket ones tend to be easier to seat and just as tight of hold. I decided to try out the bolt-thru kit on the Xig...really it doesn't seem any more secure than the push pins, which impressed me more-so on the push-pin design and tension force used on that cooler. If it was a failed design it wouldn't continue to be used, it's nice for quick service and replacement. I'm sure Intel would've changed how it's coolers were seated if there was a severe performance or damage issue from the design...some might nay-say that, but really if it was a real issue instead of a small gripe or complaint, it'd be different today. Those that don't like them can find either bolt-thru kits or different coolers to use that get the job done just-as-well if not better, then the pissing and moaning about the clips should be less-so. Again I don't mind them, it's not that big of a deal, the cooler looks pretty good to me, end of story.

:toast:
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#14
Basard
push pins could be good, i think, if done right.... i mean, they are like rivets almost, how bad could they be, unless the manufacturer goes cheap... u could just mod it with some nuts and bolts... I like how this has two heatpipes directly over the die of cpu though... unlike 3-pipe hdt coolers... only one is right over die....

this cooler would be even cooler if it had two more heatpipes alongside the ones on there already.... not hdt though... like a hybrid cooler haha...
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#15
TheGuruStud
by: SimFreak47
Rosewill coolers are nice IMO. Their power supplies are another story though..
That's not true. The "400W" ones they ship with the cases are tough as hell. Back when the 6800 series was king, you could put a gaming rig on those and it would take the abuse. I don't know of any (that I or my buddies used) that has failed yet.

I have the 550W (120mm fan) and it's used extensively. No V sagging or overheating.

I'm sure they've had bad batches, but I keep on using the ones with good reviews on the egg and haven't had a problem.

About the coolers, for the 16 bucks I paid (free shipping I believe), it's awesome.
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#16
TheGuruStud
by: btarunr
You have the convenience of not having to rip your whole box apart (take the motherboard out) with push-pins.
That's why I love my old zalman 7000 cooler. You just screw it to the MB, no back plate install or anything. What was wrong with that? We're going backwards with these new coolers and MB holes.
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#17
Zubasa
It seems like everybody are debating about the push pins instead of discussing about the Cooler. :roll:
Anyways, the Overclocker 3 PC Coolers are inexpensive while efficient.:toast:
Had pretty good experience with them.
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#18
tkpenalty
Us Xigmatek users will just need to purchase a 1366 crossbow kit lol.

Guys stop bitching about the push pins. They're enough to hold down the cooler while providing enough mounting pressure. Its a rather small cooler anyway, so a bolt thru is somewhat overkill in this case.

by: TheGuruStud
That's why I love my old zalman 7000 cooler. You just screw it to the MB, no back plate install or anything. What was wrong with that? We're going backwards with these new coolers and MB holes.
Uh... there is a backplate for the Zalman CNPS7000, unless you're talking about the 478 mounting. No thats what you call going backwards because the bracket is not as sturdy as a bolt thru.
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#19
TheGuruStud
by: tkpenalty
Us Xigmatek users will just need to purchase a 1366 crossbow kit lol.

Guys stop bitching about the push pins. They're enough to hold down the cooler while providing enough mounting pressure. Its a rather small cooler anyway, so a bolt thru is somewhat overkill in this case.



Uh... there is a backplate for the Zalman CNPS7000, unless you're talking about the 478 mounting. No thats what you call going backwards because the bracket is not as sturdy as a bolt thru.
I never installed the back plate. It wasn't needed at all. I had two screw holes after I took off the plastic top the MB came with. She screwed right down tighter than anything else I've seen.

This was an early 939 board.
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#20
OnBoard
Nice looking fins on the cooler and I'd rather have this as stock cooler than the one it comes with (but wouldn't buy it).

btw. that base finish looks much better than in any DHT cooler to date.
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#21
Hayder_Master
by: theonetruewill
Your turn the clips to take them out and oull, or push the piuns down to put it in. Estimated time taken for reinstallation of a cooler: 1-2 minutes. With a backplate you're looking at a whole lot longer...
agree , it is really simple
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#22
InnocentCriminal
Resident Grammar Amender
I hate AMD's retention clip design. Anyroad, this cooler would look perfect on the new Foxconn board.
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#23
Octavean
Personally I have yet to see a direct contact heat pipe cooler that has been well designed IMO. Now while this cooler obviously isn’t intended to be a high-end cooler I’d probably prefer to go with stock cooling or something with better cooling then the “Red Sea” rather then going for something in the middle of the road (or marginally better then stock).

The best design approach for a direct contact heat pipe cooler IMO is to have the contact surface (pipes) physically touching one another (no gaps) and have enough of them to cover the heat spreader of a modern CPU completely. In order for the heat pipes to make contact with each other they would need to touch at their diameter. In order for the heat pipes to touch the cooling surface of the CPU heat spreader with no gaps the heat pipes would have to be cut all the way down to its contact point with each other (diameter). So you would get half a pipe at the point of contact and it would be ideal to add mass in thermal contact at this point on the other side of the pipes which is a common technique anyway.

Most of what I have seen with respect to direct heat pipe coolers just looks like sloppy design or sloppy implementation. Even if they work well or well enough they could be made better.

This Red Sea cooler looks a little like a Thermaltake cooler to me. Perhaps I’m just being thrown off a bit by the color scheme of the fan but sure it looks a bit like a Rosewill too.

Funny how the Red Sea Cooler and the ThermalRight Ultra were both mounted on an ASUS P6T Deluxe for its photo shoot. Perhaps the P6T Deluxe is in abundance and ready for launch in mass and the other boards are not? Hummmmmm,....

Notice I didn’t say anything about the Push-pins ;)
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#24
TheGuruStud
by: Octavean

Notice I didn’t say anything about the Push-pins ;)
You just did! :nutkick:

:)
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#25
zithe
I've never had a bad experience with push-pins. You just pop them in 1,3,2,4, and use a screw driver to rotate them in place. Done.
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