Monday, October 20th 2008

ASUS Launches Four New Full HD LCD Monitors

Cognizant that the brilliant reproduction of colors is the key to believability and immersion during movie watching and gaming, ASUS today launched the VK266H and VW266H widescreen (16:10 aspect ratio) LCD monitors which support 1920x1200 high resolution, Full HD 1080p video playback via an HDMI input, a high 20000:1 contrast ratio, 2 ms (gray-to-gray) response time and ASUS' exclusive Splendid Video Intelligence Technology. Splendid utilizes a color engine that analyzes the properties of video content being played back and automatically optimizes image quality for the best visual results in any usage scenario—ultimately making for a vastly improved personal entertainment experience. In keeping with ASUS' recent drive to integrate video conferencing features into its monitors, the ASUS VK266H is also equipped with a rotatable 2.0 megapixel webcam with Smart EV (Exposure Value) Control technology to enable high quality and convenient real-time video communications under different lighting conditions.


Splendid Video Intelligence Technology
Underpinning the ASUS VK266H and VW266H's stunning visual performance is the exclusive Splendid Video Intelligence Technology which adjusts the displays' parameters to ensure the best possible color and image reproduction based on the nature of the user's current task. Its color engine analyzes the properties of video content being played back and optimizes image quality for the best visual results. Users can experience this brilliant technology in all ASUS LCD monitors.

Splendid features five video preset modes (Theater, Game, Scenery, Night View and Standard) and three skin tone selections (Natural, Reddish and Yellowish) to enable users to further fine-tune the monitors to achieve specific results. Theater mode, for example, enhances the contrast and color saturation of video content to deliver a cinematic experience. Game mode adaptively brings up the dark areas of in-game scenes, enabling users to see creatures cloaked in shadow. Scenery mode increases the brightness range, introduces more contrast gradations and selectively tweaks the color saturation of key elements such as blue skies and green fields to make for more captivating land and seascapes. Night View mode smartly highlights the details in dark scenes, capturing the beauty of night footage in crisp and vibrant fashion. These five video preset modes are conveniently selectable via hotkeys, enabling users to instantly effect changes to their display settings according to their preferences.

A Host of Industry-leading Image Processing Technologies
In addition to Splendid, the ASUS VK266H and VW266H incorporate a host of advanced image processing technologies that further bolster their performance. These include Trace Free technology that delivers a 2 ms (gray-to-gray) quick response time to eliminate image ghosting, ASUS Smart Contrast Ratio (ASCR) technology that amplifies the contrast ratio to an astounding 20000:1, and Aspect Control technology that enables the playback of 4:3 images without distortion. Moreover, the VK266H and VW266H both incorporate DCDi technology which improves the image quality of fast motion footage through deinterlacing and anti-aliasing.

Full HD LCD Monitor Lineup to Be Completed in Latter Half of October 2008
In the latter half of October 2008, two 24” widescreen models will join the VK266H and VW266H, namely the VK246H and VW246H—the former of which features an integrated 1.3 megapixel webcam. All four models boast an HDMI interface, enabling the delivery of multichannel audio and uncompressed digital video through a single cable for Full HD 1080p quality—perfect for high definition movie playback and gaming. Having an HDMI input also ensures convenient connectivity with other home entertainment devices, such as Blu-ray Disc players and game consoles. In addition, the VK266H and VW266H feature a Component video input (YPbPr) and a S/PDIF digital audio output for more multimedia connectivity options. All four monitors are equipped with stereo speakers that are capable of delivering remarkable audio quality for games, movies and music.

The latter half of 2008 will also see the launch of a new series of 16:9 HD/Full HD monitors, completing ASUS' Full HD LCD monitor lineup for 2008. For more information, visit www.asus.com.Source: ASUS
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17 Comments on ASUS Launches Four New Full HD LCD Monitors

#1

I want something that goes beyond HD 1080P, yawn...
#2
to6ko91
by: insider
I want something that goes beyond HD 1080P, yawn...
Get a 2500x1600:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#3
Bjorn_Of_Iceland
Very nice for movie buffs. Too large for my taste though (In fact, I push my 22" away so that I may have a good fov when fraggin ^^)
Posted on Reply
#4
Mussels
Moderprator
boo. i'm sick of these half truths. if it was 1080P it would be 1920x1080, not 1920x1200. Its the wrong aspect ratio, therefor it is not a 1080P or a 'full HD' screen.

black bars do not make for a fun movie experience, and stretching the image to fit is a terrible option.
Posted on Reply
#5

Films are rarely displayed as 1920x1080P anyway due to various aspect ratios, would be better if they gave us wider screens to match theatre ratios :D
#6
Mussels
Moderprator
by: insider
Films are rarely displayed as 1920x1080P anyway due to various aspect ratios, would be better if they gave us wider screens to match theatre ratios :D
please dont bring that up. the theater aspect rations on DVD movies make me want to murder people.

Cinema/theater ratios are only ever used for a film for a month at most, before they're out of cinemas and onto DVD/blu ray - so why the hell is the short term cinema aspect ratio used, instead of the long-term format used for a decade or more in homes?
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#7
kid41212003
These are true FULL HD.
1900x1200, It's mean the LCD will display FULL of 1080i/p Bluray movies, you might see black bar, but the movie is at 1900x1080, It's mean there is no quality lost.
Full SCREEN doesn't mean FULL HD.
Posted on Reply
#8
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
wow i want lots of them.
Posted on Reply
#9
kylew
by: Mussels
boo. i'm sick of these half truths. if it was 1080P it would be 1920x1080, not 1920x1200. Its the wrong aspect ratio, therefor it is not a 1080P or a 'full HD' screen.

black bars do not make for a fun movie experience, and stretching the image to fit is a terrible option.
The requirement for 1080P though is just that it's able to display 1920x1080 1:1.

I personally prefer 1920x1200 to 1920x1080 for computer monitors. 16:10 screens have an aspect ratio of 1.6:1, which is very pleasing to humans visually for some reason, and it's used a lot in architecture, it's called the golden ratio.

Movies have black bars top and bottom most of the time anyway, especially since most movies are displayed in a wider aspect ration than 16:9 anyway, so you'd get black bars on both 16:10 and 16:9 screens.
Posted on Reply
#10
FatForester
by: Mussels
please dont bring that up. the theater aspect rations on DVD movies make me want to murder people.

Cinema/theater ratios are only ever used for a film for a month at most, before they're out of cinemas and onto DVD/blu ray - so why the hell is the short term cinema aspect ratio used, instead of the long-term format used for a decade or more in homes?
Yea, I hate how no one can make up their minds on an aspect ratio. I've seen a few Blu-ray movies display at 1920x800, which is even dumber since you would think on a widescreen TV with an HD source they wouldn't try to screw it up anymore. If studios are too stupid enough to use a logical resolution for the consumer, then either the standard HDTV aspect ratio or cinema aspect ratio need to change. It's really stupid when a movie is a wider aspect ratio than your WIDESCREEN HDTV.
Posted on Reply
#11
ghost101
by: kylew

Movies have black bars top and bottom most of the time anyway, especially since most movies are displayed in a wider aspect ration than 16:9 anyway, so you'd get black bars on both 16:10 and 16:9 screens.
Very true. But you get a larger picture given the same size screen. Yes its only an inch diagonal or so but its something. Also most TV programmes are still 16:9 and a lot of people now watch TV on their PCs.
Posted on Reply
#12
cheesemonkey
would of been class in 20" and 22".
Love the integrated cam and specs!
Posted on Reply
#13
SystemViper
I have 2 asus monitors and i love both of them, interesting to see what new with them..
Posted on Reply
#14
niko084
I don't know about Nvidia, but if you have a new ATI card, it will upscale any video signal sent digitally anyways...

I did a 350mb AVI - XxX State of the Union in 320x240 for my mp3 player on a 1080p tv through my video card, and it looked as good as a standard dvd on a standard screen. No degradation what so ever, not HD quality but simply the most godlike upscale I have ever seen in my life...

1920x1200 vs 1920x1080 isn't a big deal, I watched 1080p movies on my old 1920x1200 monitor, black bars don't really matter too much, and if you have a nice video card it will upscale it anyways and it will still look perfect. Remember this is a digital screen so it is TRUE HD 1080p, its capable of a digital signal of 1920x1080 @ 60fps @ 1:1 with the digital signal you can choose not to stretch it.
Posted on Reply
#15
Wile E
Power User
by: Mussels
please dont bring that up. the theater aspect rations on DVD movies make me want to murder people.

Cinema/theater ratios are only ever used for a film for a month at most, before they're out of cinemas and onto DVD/blu ray - so why the hell is the short term cinema aspect ratio used, instead of the long-term format used for a decade or more in homes?
They would have to pan & scan the image. That's no better than the 4:3 Fullscreen DVD's. You don't get the full picture. I'll take the black bars knowing that I am seeing absolutely everything on the screen that the movie maker intended, and not some interpretation by the edit guy to get it to fit into a 16:9 screen.
Posted on Reply
#16
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Wile E
They would have to pan & scan the image. That's no better than the 4:3 Fullscreen DVD's. You don't get the full picture. I'll take the black bars knowing that I am seeing absolutely everything on the screen that the movie maker intended, and not some interpretation by the edit guy to get it to fit into a 16:9 screen.
i would prefer that the movie maker not be anal, and use the aspect ratio that his film is most likely to be watched on.
Posted on Reply
#17
Wile E
Power User
by: Mussels
i would prefer that the movie maker not be anal, and use the aspect ratio that his film is most likely to be watched on.
That's not his choice. The cameras are made that way, and have been for decades. The box office was always the number one consideration because it was what made them the most money. Home sales were secondary.

The only exceptions to the camera aspect ratio, are digital cameras. Unfortunately, the digital cameras pale in comparison to the real film cameras in terms of resolution, "pixel" density and color quality.
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