Tuesday, October 21st 2008

Microsoft Announces Global Anti-Piracy Day

Microsoft Corp. today announced Global Anti-Piracy Day, a simultaneous launch of education initiatives and enforcement actions in 49 countries on six continents to combat the sophisticated, illegal trade of pirated and counterfeit software. The programs announced today include intellectual property awareness campaigns, engagements with partner businesses, educational forums, local law enforcement training, and new legal actions against alleged software counterfeiters and pirates.

Microsoft is taking these steps as part of its commitment to working with communities, national governments and local law enforcement agencies around the world to help protect its customers and partners and promote the value of intellectual property as a driver of innovation. An interactive map detailing specific legal actions and education efforts being announced today can be found here.

“Software piracy and counterfeiting is a sophisticated, global trade with a damaging impact on consumers, businesses and economies, and Microsoft is committed to working with others around the world to stay a step ahead of this illegal industry,” said David Finn, associate general counsel for Worldwide Anti-Piracy and Anti-Counterfeiting at Microsoft. “In partnership with national governments, local law enforcement agencies, and our customer and partner communities, Microsoft is driving anti-piracy efforts across countries and continents through an equally sophisticated system of business intelligence, forensics and education. Together, we are working to identify international connection points between software pirates and counterfeiters, to help stop them in their tracks and protect consumers and legitimate businesses from this illegal trade.”

“The global trade in fakes threatens consumers, businesses and the economy,” said Guy Sebban, secretary general of the International Chamber of Commerce. “It will only be possible to halt counterfeiting and piracy on a global scale through this kind of collaboration between governments and the private sector — both to educate people about the value of intellectual property and to take action against trade in illicit products.”

Global Anti-Piracy Day provides a 24-hour snapshot of the range of education initiatives and legal actions that take place on an ongoing basis in local markets around the world. For example, Microsoft today announced that it had partnered with the American Chamber of Commerce in Brazil to launch a new blog to raise awareness among educators about the importance of teaching young people about innovation and the high cost of piracy. In Turkey, Microsoft announced it is providing the country’s Ministry of Justice with training sessions on cyber crimes and their impact and has launched a Get Genuine campaign to teach customers how to confirm that their Microsoft software is genuine. In addition, Microsoft commended the Chinese government for its recent sentencing of two illegal operators found guilty of manipulating the Microsoft Open License program and selling unlicensed software to unsuspecting customers. In Italy, Microsoft began an employee anti-piracy ambassador program to educate family and friends through informal social networks. And in the United States, Microsoft took action to protect its customers and partners by filing 20 civil lawsuits in federal court in nine states against resellers alleged to be selling computers with preloaded unlicensed and/or counterfeit Microsoft Windows XP Professional and multiple versions of Microsoft Office software. There are many more initiatives announced today summarized in the attached fact sheet.

A Shared Threat, a Shared Response
More than one third of PCs globally contain unlicensed, pirated or counterfeit software. The losses inflicted on legitimate businesses by widespread software piracy are significant. In 2007, the global economic loss was estimated at nearly $50 billion. As technological advances expand opportunities for criminal syndicates to manufacture and distribute fakes, it is clear that piracy and counterfeiting pose a real and growing threat to intellectual property and innovation. By addressing this illegal activity, Microsoft is helping to level the playing field for legitimate dealers who are harmed when illegal sales cut into their business, and ensure that consumers receive the full value of licensed, genuine Microsoft products.

“There is growing evidence that highly organized, transnational criminal organizations and networks are involved in the counterfeiting of software and other goods. This is a global problem with global sources of supply; this is why we need to work together — the public and the private sectors — to stop this trade,” said John Newton of the Intellectual Property Rights Project, Financial and High-Tech Crime Subdirectorate, INTERPOL General Secretariat. “To that end, Microsoft and INTERPOL are now cooperating with police and customs agencies around the world to use all available intelligence to ensure that our joint investigations lead to arrests and convictions of criminal counterfeiters.”

Protecting Customers
Microsoft is concerned not only about the continued negative impact on economies and legitimate businesses, but the risk to consumers, as well. Counterfeit software exposes consumers to an increased risk of viruses, worms and other damaging code including spyware and Trojan horses. Customers expect to receive genuine, high-quality software, but counterfeit copies often contain malicious code and/or malware and fail to operate properly. This, in turn, can present a significant risk of security breaches and lost business data, damaged reputation, and the need to invest thousands of dollars to recover from incidents of malicious software on individual workstations. Microsoft’s Genuine Software Initiative is aimed at helping businesses and consumers understand and avoid the risks of using counterfeit software. For example, online validation tools for Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office make it easy for customers to quickly verify whether their software is genuine. Should the software end up being counterfeit, customers are provided with information on what they can do to secure a legitimate copy of the software.

How Customers Can Report Piracy
Tips from customers and partners are vital in helping Microsoft address piracy. Microsoft encourages anyone who receives suspicious software to call the company’s anti-piracy hotline at (800) RU-LEGIT (785-3448). More information about genuine Microsoft products, licensing and labels is available at howtotell.com.Source: Microsoft
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28 Comments on Microsoft Announces Global Anti-Piracy Day

#1
uber_cookie
Let’s go for drink to celebrate lol ;)
they should of made it an international holiday to make more people aware...
Posted on Reply
#2
Mussels
Moderprator
ooh goody, can we make the day after global pirate day? :D

I'm not all that opposed to individual piracy, however i do feel that counterfeiting rings need to be shut down (the people who make money from piracy, as opposed to save money)
Posted on Reply
#3
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
If Microsoft didn't charge an arm, leg, heart, and brain with interest for their products, more people would be willing to purchase it rather than resort to piracy. That especially goes for Microsoft Office and Visual Studio. Blatant rip-offs there. I mean, you don't even have to convince people to use OpenOffice--just tell them the price of an Office bundle and they'll crap their pants. :|
Posted on Reply
#5
AphexDreamer
Or if you could trust that a released product of theirs would perform as they say it would, people wouldn't have to "test" it before they buy (Vista).

They want this done so they can get richer, right? Spoiled Brats, they are rich enough with out taking more money from us.
Posted on Reply
#6
alexp999
Staff
I agree MS products should be cheaper. But I think what I paid was fair.
Vista Home Premium OEM for £50 (Though that should be the retail price)
and Office Ultimate 2007 for £39.99 :rockout:
Posted on Reply
#7
Ahhzz
I buy a lot more movies these days, now that they're a bit more reasonable. Buy the games that I like to support the developer. Go to concerts to support the artist....not sure how the numbers work out for that, whether they get more pennies from CD sales or concerts, but I like to think they get more from the concerts....plus, I just feel that they deserve to see their fans if they go thru the effort to show up at all these venues :). Applications? hmmm.... I've bought some....when they're useful...not sure about that...
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#8
Triprift
Lol ms interested in something other then there bottom line yeah right.
Posted on Reply
#9
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
by: AphexDreamer
They want this done so they can get richer, right? Spoiled Brats, they are rich enough with out taking more money from us.
The fact that they are spending money that they made from people buying their products in attempt to "teach" others that pirating is bad I think qualifies as an "epic fail." Those that are pirating know it is wrong but feel Microsoft doesn't deserve their money. Instead of pointing the finger at pirates, they should be looking in the mirror.


by: Ahhzz
...whether they get more pennies from CD sales or concerts...
Concerts, by far. Artists get ripped off by record publishers as much as consumers do. They also get put on a short chain in a contract. A lot of artists are revolting against the recording industry, like Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails.
Posted on Reply
#10
Viscarious
At least they realize that any attempts that they make to make their products secure against piracy is a lost hope. Anything humans make can be reverse engineered by humans again.

Also, change over to linux instead. Only thing linux needs is a touch more hardware support and its a solid competitor.
Posted on Reply
#11
TRIPTEX_CAN
If MS didnt have the 10million error reports sent in daily from the mostly pirated copies of Vista then SP1 would still be BETA.

I do honestly think PC gamers are shooting themselves in the foot by pirating games. We only get a few descent games released every year most of them are by no means original and the games that are released by newer developers can hardly make a profit to stay in the game. So here we are stuck with EA (ball suckers) being one of the few companies with stable enough overhead to make new games year after year with less and less effort or ingenuity put into the games.

Eventually only EA, Ubisoft, and handful of other devs will actually be making games while ATI and Nvidia keep pumping out more new hardware. No games to play but tons of new hardware??? Sounds shitty to me.

But I have a rule for games.. Download everything.. delete the horrible games (fuel of war).. and buy the ones worth playing (COD4).
Posted on Reply
#12
Ahhzz
by: TRIPTEX_MTL


But I have a rule for games.. Download everything.. delete the horrible games (fuel of war).. and buy the ones worth playing (COD4).
Afraid that's me too :(
Posted on Reply
#13
Exavier
but that system works tbh, if you're buying what you enjoy after you get your first taste I'd say there's no negative impact on the industry..if you're so inclined you could even say companies can see how popular games are from the amount they get dl'd, adding into the consumer base..
Posted on Reply
#14
AphexDreamer
Wait if they know (Game Developers, Microsoft, etc...) that they are losing tons of money off of people illegally obtaining their products then why don't they start selling them for like $15 a game or $50 bucks and OS to get money where they weren't getting any.
Posted on Reply
#15
TRIPTEX_CAN
by: AphexDreamer
Wait if they know (Game Developers, Microsoft, etc...) that they are losing tons of money off of people illegally obtaining their products then why don't they start selling them for like $15 a game or $50 bucks and OS to get money where they weren't getting any.
Because that would make sense. Plus MS doesnt really want PC to gain the momentum it deserves... it would take too much market from the x360 and its overrated overpriced LIVE service.
Posted on Reply
#16
timta2
Ok, I'm just tired of Microsoft starting these programs that they claim will benefit US the people when really it ONLY benefits them!

"Microsoft is taking these steps as part of its commitment to working with communities, national governments and local law enforcement agencies around the world to help protect its customers"
Posted on Reply
#17
sofarfrome
by: timta2
Ok, I'm just tired of Microsoft starting these programs that they claim will benefit US the people when really it ONLY benefits them!

"Microsoft is taking these steps as part of its commitment to working with communities, national governments and local law enforcement agencies around the world to help protect its customers"
Actually, this type of action also benefits all of their stock holders. Those include large funds that will one day give us our retirement packages (if we are lucky enough). And since the DOW (of which MS is a part) moves up/down based on their quarterly results it also benefits/impacts world markets and the respective retirement funds of the people of that country/market.

That being said, MS products certainly are too expensive IMHO. But we need to fund Bill's $1Billion philanthropic organization. I would like to be the person that runs that. Last I know she was making $1Million per year to give away his money. Nice gig if you can get it.
Posted on Reply
#18
CrAsHnBuRnXp
by: FordGT90Concept
If Microsoft didn't charge an arm, leg, heart, and brain with interest for their products, more people would be willing to purchase it rather than resort to piracy. That especially goes for Microsoft Office and Visual Studio. Blatant rip-offs there. I mean, you don't even have to convince people to use OpenOffice--just tell them the price of an Office bundle and they'll crap their pants. :|
$400 for an OS is way to much. Charge like 25 for HP, 30 for Business, 50 for ulitmate. 2500 for server 2008 is way to freaking much.

If software was priced properly there woudlnt be a need for piracy.
Posted on Reply
#19
lemonadesoda
First I'll put my tin hat on. Then...

I actually think that MS prices ARE CHEAP. If you think of the productivity gains that an office worker has using a PC and e.g. Office, then it is dirt cheap.

The biggest cost to most businesses is salaries and taxes. I think people expect to get paid too much BUT WORSE the govts. esp. in EU drain the life blood out of businesses with their complex tax bureaucracy and high tax rates.

For the home-user, then YES, MS products are too expensive unless you are able to get the "student editions", which, again, I think are fair prices.

What annoys me is this "cost of piracy" = $billions figure. Most of the pirates, incl myself, stick some software on their home computer that - if they had to pay for it - would never never be bought or installed. It becomes a kind of marketing for business. We use it, become proficient, and therefore use legit copies in business. (ie revenue generating activities).

I think there should be a little more latitide for "home use grey zone" and that home-licenses should be made cheap, not just to "students".
Posted on Reply
#20
Ahhzz
I agree. I recommend software that I may or may not have legal copies of to my customers, because I HAVE used the product, and can help them with basic setup, and can make informed recommendations on these packages. There's no way I could recommend Photoshop or some of the other high end products without knowing at least something about the app.
Posted on Reply
#21
panchoman
Sold my stars!
ROFLMAO is all i have to say.
Posted on Reply
#22
Megasty
pff, sucking on an egg would give them better results :p
Posted on Reply
#23
AphexDreamer
All OS's should be free, like Linux. Then if they do good, people can donate.:p
Posted on Reply
#24

fail :roll:
#25
tkpenalty
by: Ahhzz
I agree. I recommend software that I may or may not have legal copies of to my customers, because I HAVE used the product, and can help them with basic setup, and can make informed recommendations on these packages. There's no way I could recommend Photoshop or some of the other high end products without knowing at least something about the app.
Theres something called trial versions is there not?
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