Friday, October 24th 2008

Intel Shows a New Jet Engine Style Notebook Cooling Technology

What with the likes of the Apple MacBook Air and similar ultrathin laptops in production, Intel is recognising that there will be an increasing problem with heat, especially with its new chips around the corner. Mooly Eden, general manager of Intel's Mobile Platforms Group was speaking at a keynote at the Intel Developer Forum in Taipei.
When you design a very thin system, cooling the skin is a very big challenge... If you put [a laptop] on your lap, it can feel very uncomfortable. Very hot.
Eden went on to say that if this problem is not addressed there will be a limit as to how thin a laptop can me made. They used the example of a jet engine explaining that the high temperatures inside the engine (up to 1000 degrees centigrade) must not be transfered to the plane's wing, as that is where the fuel is stored. The technology used on aircraft to accomplish this is called laminar airflow cooling, which is what Intel plans license to manufacturers for use in cooling its products, it is a system in which a fluid flows in layers.
Fortunately this is not the only trick up Intel's sleeve, Eden also explained that laptop platform for Intel's Nehalem architecture will have the memory controller, IGP and CPU all on one die and that the native power saving features will allow processor cores to turn on and off without the use of software.
[It is done] automatically on the fly. It is transparent to the operating system

Source: CNET
Add your own comment

15 Comments on Intel Shows a New Jet Engine Style Notebook Cooling Technology

#1
Wile E
Power User
Turning cores off can't be transparent to the OS. One minute it will see 4 cores, then next thing it knows, there's only 1 core. Unless, of course, they figured out a way to get multiple cores to act as one large single core. Now THAT would be awesome.
Posted on Reply
#2
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
by: Wile E
Turning cores off can't be transparent to the OS. One minute it will see 4 cores, then next thing it knows, there's only 1 core. Unless, of course, they figured out a way to get multiple cores to act as one large single core. Now THAT would be awesome.
I'm not sure exactly how the operating system detects it (BIOS, processor itself, or code in the OS) but, I'm sure it's not that hard to fool them. I don't get what this "laminar flow" thing is though. :S
Posted on Reply
#4
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Yeah, that makes sense in aircraft but I don't see how it could cool a processor better. The "laminar layer" acts as an insulator to the "laminar flow." When you're trying to draw heat away, a "laminar layer" is the last thing you want.
Posted on Reply
#5
Viscarious
Hmm, this is interesting. I've been pondering upgrading my lappy's processor when I get some extra cash. Im not quite sure though, as the rest of the lappys system is pretty insync.

I think intel makes a 2.8ghz P series duo which is a little more then half a ghz more then mine. Only thing I've been pondering about is the video card being the limitation and or heat. My current chip has gotten as hot as 47c during CSS or COD4. Thats not hot but im not sure for a laptop. I think Im really off topic and am going to stop typing.
Posted on Reply
#6
1c3d0g
47C is not hot for a laptop. I'd raise an eyebrow at 55C, but I wouldn't get worried until it reached 60C.
Posted on Reply
#7
Basard
so where are the turbines?

i like the little blue "air streaks" in the first pic, blue signifies cold, this must be good..... cold air in--nice concept guys.:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#8
niko084
Interesting, but I want to see more details as it develops.
Posted on Reply
#9
PCpraiser100
Cool, but I want something to extend the battery life of a laptop during gaming sessions. My old Hp laptop is burning my leg off.
Posted on Reply
#10
Steevo
Most heat transfer occurs in the boundry layer, AKA laminar flow area. However the idea here is not so much heat transfer but keeping your legs from cooking by using two layers of boundary flow, one cool to keep the skin of the laptop cool , and one hot to transfer the heat away.
Posted on Reply
#11
Triprift
That would be great if it works as heat is the one major thing that holds lappys back.
Posted on Reply
#12
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
Why not just carry around a tank of liquid nitrogen like i do ...
Posted on Reply
#13
Triprift
Lol now that would be cool lappy in one hand liquid nitrogen in the other.
Posted on Reply
#14
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
Would be good for the summer :P ice cream anyone ?
Posted on Reply
#15
Wile E
Power User
by: 1c3d0g
47C is not hot for a laptop. I'd raise an eyebrow at 55C, but I wouldn't get worried until it reached 60C.
60C isn't uncommon for a lappy either. It's perfectly fine at those temps, tho lower is always better of course.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment