Tuesday, December 9th 2008

Preliminary Tests on Intel Core i5 Conducted

i5? i5! Core i5 would be the brand name Intel's mainstream desktop derivatives of the Nehalem architecture based on the Lynnfield core would carry. It is similar to its big brother, the Core i7 for the most of the part except for a few differences:
  • A current generation Direct Media Interface (DMI) Interconnect as chipset interface
  • A 128-bit wide DDR3 memory interface (Dual Channel) instead of triple-channel
  • Some more machinery from the northbridge migrated to the CPU, such as the PCI-Express root complex
  • The newer LGA 1160 socket
Lynnfield continues to have four x86 processing cores with HyperThreading enabled, with 256 KB of L2 cache per core and a shared 8 MB L3 cache. Chiphell got its hands on not only the processor, but also a compatible motherboard and run a quick preliminary evaluation of the processor. The processor, clocked at 2,127 MHz, was put though SuperPi, wPrime, Cinebench, Fritz Chess, and 3DMark Vantage. The processor is expected to release in the second half of 2009.


Source: ChipHell
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48 Comments on Preliminary Tests on Intel Core i5 Conducted

#1
Bl4ck
Super Pi score just like on my old E6400@3200Mhz :F
Not worth buying when the i7 920 price goes down (someday)
Also possible rival for Phenom 1.
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#2
frankie827
another new socket to make things so much more difficult...
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#3
TheLostSwede
Ok, Lynnfield and Havendale both have QPI, but it's only between the CPU core and the integrated northbridge. The northbridge is then using DMI to talk to the ICH. I don't know where this misconception is coming from, but all the new Intel processors will use QPI. :banghead:
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#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
You're right. Earlier reports showed it had an "FSB". Then we realise the P55 is only a peripheral controller (PCH) :o
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#5
James1991
by: btarunr
Some more machinery from the northbridge migrated to the CPU, such as the PCI-Express root complex
one day we are going to be buying CPU's and plugging a monitor straight into it and it will be all you will need:laugh:
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#6
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I really don't like Intel's idea of releasing two seperate sockets with the new generation.
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#7
Ripper3
It makes upgrades extremely difficult. You'd have to buy an extra stick of RAM to take advantage of triple-channel memory, along with a new motherboard, to complement the new CPU, if going from i5 to i7 (I guess that's how people would upgrade, rather than going the other way).
It's a huge outlay, and for not a huge increase in performance, the i7 920 as mentioned, will come down in price, and at the moment, it's not even all that expensive. I can either buy a Core 2 Quad, or an i7 920 for similar prices, the only thing making it an expensive purchase, is the need for DDR3, and the pricey X55 based motherboards.
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#8
laszlo
by: newtekie1
I really don't like Intel's idea of releasing two seperate sockets with the new generation.
another good base for amd marketing don't you think?
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#9
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
It makes it even more difficult, because the average consumer won't understand why they can't upgrade from an i5 to an i7 directly, without upgrading the motherboard.

The extra memory stick won't make too big of a deal, as you can run i7 in dual-channel without much of a performance hit.

What disappoints me, and I'm sure this is one of the reasons Intel is doing this, is that you can't take a low end processor, stick it in a high end board and overclock it to hell and back to make it perform like a high-end. Because, now the low end uses totally different motherboards, and the best motherboards will be reserved for only the i7.
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#10
laszlo
by: newtekie1
It makes it even more difficult, because the average consumer won't understand why they can't upgrade from an i5 to an i7 directly, without upgrading the motherboard.

The extra memory stick won't make too big of a deal, as you can run i7 in dual-channel without much of a performance hit.

What disappoints me, and I'm sure this is one of the reasons Intel is doing this, is that you can't take a low end processor, stick it in a high end board and overclock it to hell and back to make it perform like a high-end. Because, now the low end uses totally different motherboards, and the best motherboards will be reserved for only the i7.
yes is disappointing for end-user who is forced to buy new hardware for a minor upgrade...

is like a conspiracy between cpu producers and mb manufacturer but other way they die
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#11

Exactly, I'd avoid the i5 platform and wait for at least another generation before upgrading, you could pick up any revised i7 40nm/35nm chip plus newer boards when they, along with DDR3 becomes much cheaper!
#12
janithdg
a little snag

i hv a liittle problem in da screen shots, hvnt u any of u figure out that there 6GB of memory and it only has a 128bit dual channel memory control so how can there be 4 or 8GB's of memory
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#13
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: laszlo
yes is disappointing for end-user who is forced to buy new hardware for a minor upgrade...

is like a conspiracy between cpu producers and mb manufacturer but other way they die
I don't think the motherboard manufacturers had much to do with it. Intel decided to use two sockets, so the motherboard manufacturers are kind of just along for the ride.

by: insider
Exactly, I'd avoid the i5 platform and wait for at least another generation before upgrading, you could pick up any revised i7 40nm/35nm chip plus newer boards when they along with DDR3 becomes much cheaper!
I'm sticking with my Socket 775 setup until at least the end of 09. And really, Intel will have 3 sockets going at the same time, as they are going to keep 775 alive for a little while until i5 is established in the market.

Personally, if they were going to do the two socket thing, I would have like for them to just keep 775 going, and only release i7 processors.

by: janithdg
i hv a liittle problem in da screen shots, hvnt u any of u figure out that there 6GB of memory and it only has a 128bit dual channel memory control so how can there be 4 or 8GB's of memory
2x1GB + 2x2GB = 6GB in Dual Channel
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#14
lemonadesoda
by: laszlo
yes is disappointing for end-user who is forced to buy new hardware for a minor upgrade...

is like a conspiracy between cpu producers and mb manufacturer but other way they die
Remember it is a conspiracy between the CPU producers and the mainboard chipset producers.

Oh, they're both Intel! :rolleyes:
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#15
johnnyfiive
by: newtekie1
I really don't like Intel's idea of releasing two seperate sockets with the new generation.
Me either. :shadedshu Makes no sense. Why not use the same socket? i5 owners can't upgrade to an i7 down the road, which sucks. Either or, its nice to see variety.
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#16
Tatty_One
Super Moderator
by: newtekie1
I really don't like Intel's idea of releasing two seperate sockets with the new generation.
I was going to write a short paragraph in total agreement with you, however I wont because this cr*p annoys me sooooo much I would go ranting around the internet for a week and at my age that leads to coronary failure, in itself perhaps not too important, apart from the fact that it's nearly Christmas and I wanna be alive to open me presents, damn difficult to get all that sticky tape off when your dead!
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#17

They will probably release a 40/35/30nm revision of the i7, but as you will all expect that is the same socket but requires another motherboard upgrade, haha suckers!
#18
InnocentCriminal
Resident Grammar Amender
Depending on the price to performance ratio, I don't really see this as a valuable option to remember to customers, however I'll wait until the reviews & results are in. Not keen on these i5s to be honest.

by: janithdg
i hv a liittle problem in da screen shots, hvnt u any of u figure out that there 6GB of memory and it only has a 128bit dual channel memory control so how can there be 4 or 8GB's of memory
Welcome to the forums dawg! It's always a good idea to fill your system specifications and you've got some interesting lingo, where are you from dude?
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#19
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: insider
They will probably release a 40/35/30nm revision of the i7, but as you will all expect that is the same socket but requires another motherboard upgrade, haha suckers!
That is generally not the case when you buy quality motherboard from the start, and they have Intel chipsets(which is the only option for i7 and i5 is seems).
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#20

Remember Intel 975? lacks support for Penryn chips...
#21
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
I thought it was called the corei7 because it was intels 7th generation of processor architecture wise.
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#22
lemonadesoda
by: DrPepper
I thought it was called the corei7 because it was intels 7th generation of processor architecture wise.
...meaning that the i5 is a step backwards? :cool:

by: Bl4ck
Super Pi score just like on my old E6400@3200Mhz :F
Not worth buying when the i7 920 price goes down (someday)
Also possible rival for Phenom 1.
Ah, but this thing is at only 2.1Ghz. AND this (SuperPI) is a single threaded benchmark.

Mix in an OC of 40% and gains from HT and you can expect 50% improvement, CLOCK4CLOCK. If it can manage that AND be more power efficient, then yes, Intel has indeed got a much better starting platform for the average PC owner and corporate PC. But, of course, there isnt the ZOMG of the i7.

WAIT, I dont remember the i7 pulling 50% improvement C4C. So maybe C4C the i5 and i7 are pretty much equal. Only in superOCability or on memory bandwidth intensive applications is i7 going to pull away from i5.

i5 might actually (let's wait for pricing) be quite a performance bargain.
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#23
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
by: lemonadesoda
...meaning that the i5 is a step backwards?


Ah, but this thing is at only 2.1Ghz. AND this (SuperPI) is a single threaded benchmark.

Mix in an OC of 40% and gains from HT and you can expect 50% improvement, CLOCK4CLOCK. If it can manage that AND be more power efficient, then yes, Intel has indeed got a much better starting platform for the average PC owner and corporate PC. But, of course, there isnt the ZOMG of the i7.

WAIT, I dont remember the i7 pulling 50% improvement C4C. So maybe C4C the i5 and i7 are pretty much equal. Only in superOCability or on memory bandwidth intensive applications is i7 going to pull away from i5.

i5 might actually (let's wait for pricing) be quite a performance bargain.
This isn't a new architecture and why skip i6 then.
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#24
lemonadesoda

Actually, thats quite impressive. I get about 10000 xCPU score on my Q6600 @2.7. They get 25% better score at 2.1GHz. CLOCK4CLOCK that is over 50% improvement. HATS OFF if they can pull that off with lower power requirements.
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#25
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: insider
Remember Intel 975? lacks support for Penryn chips...
It is really a surprise to you that an desktop chipset doesn't support mobile processors?:laugh:

Anyway, I assume you mean that the 975X doesn't support Intel's 45nm desktop processors(Wolfdale/Yorkfield).

In that case, you would be wrong. My old P5W DH Deluxe supported both the dual-core and quad-core 45nm processors. The chipset supports them fine, but that isn't the case with all motherboards based off that chipset. Which is why I said you need to buy a quality motherboard. If you bought a quality motherboard with a 975x chipset, it should support even the latest offerings.

Hell, even my P5B, which was the lowest of the Mid-Range boards when I bought it still supports Wolfdales and Yorkfields.
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