Sunday, December 14th 2008

Swiftech Introduces the Full-Cover Caldera HD4870X2 Water Block

Introducing the Caldera cooling system for AMD HD4870X2 graphics cards from Swiftech. The Caldera 4870X2 is a hybrid cooling system for AMD HD4870X2 reference graphics cards. It is composed of two separate elements: a water-block that cools both GPU's, and a passive heatsink to cool the rest of the components such as the GDDR5 memory, voltage regulators and the I/O chip. The Caldera 4870X2 water-block utilizes Swiftech's proven Diamond Pin Matrix technology and premium copper baseplate for the highest cooling performance. Additionally, there's a built-in white LED that illuminates throught the clear acrylic sides of the GPU water block when in operation. The full-cover water block weights in 411g and has a MSRP of $159.95. It is available now. Inside the package you'll also find 1/2" barbs, (2) plugs, thermal pads, Arctic Céramique thermal grease, mounting screws and installation guide.

Source: Swiftech
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15 Comments on Swiftech Introduces the Full-Cover Caldera HD4870X2 Water Block

#1
Mussels
Moderprator
not sure how popular the LED will be, but that does look rather neat and tidy. perfect for people trying to cram 4 cards in a P.
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#2
eidairaman1
looks nice, but i think it needs taller fins if possible, also the space where the 1 block comes in contact with the other, i say put some Silver Compound in between them if they can transfer heat like a heatsink that way, i know it be messy but its worth a shot if the spacing between the blocks isnt extremely wide. oops didnt realize the ram was passive sinked, too bad that isnt a waterblock aswell.
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#3
Zehnsucht
What is most awesome with this is that the Caldera Heatsink is compatible with the MCW-60's.
The MCW-60 is a quite common block (since it's compatible with more or less every GPU on the market), and buying one extra plus the caldera heatsink is a lot less than buying for example an EK FC block.

Plus the MCW-60's can be reused another time.

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#4
HTC
Anyone has seen any reviews of this ... hybrid thingy?

I mean: compared to regular water or air cooling: how does it compare?
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#5
Zehnsucht
by: eidairaman1
looks nice, but i think it needs taller fins if possible, also the space where the 1 block comes in contact with the other, i say put some Silver Compound in between them if they can transfer heat like a heatsink that way, i know it be messy but its worth a shot if the spacing between the blocks isnt extremely wide. oops didnt realize the ram was passive sinked, too bad that isnt a waterblock aswell.
If you use the caldera water block the heat sink will also be cooled by the water.

HTC: Comparing GPU blocks is relatively pointless. All full cover blocks perform within a couple of centigrades from each other. And the restriction of newer blocks are also usually very low.

For the HD4870x2 you cannot compare to air cooling, since there is no after market coolers available.

And when talking about cooling GPU's, it's not like you can overclock it much further because you have the core at 30C rather than 60C. What usually limits GPU OC is the voltage to the card.
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#6
HTC
by: Zehnsucht
If you use the caldera water block the heat sink will also be cooled by the water.

HTC: Comparing GPU blocks is relatively pointless. All full cover blocks perform within a couple of centigrades from each other. And the restriction of newer blocks are also usually very low.

For the HD4870x2 you cannot compare to air cooling, since there is no after market coolers available.
Dunno, really: never used water so i can't really say.

Was just wondering how this particular one would compare to others already on the market.
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#7
jyoung75
by: Zehnsucht
For the HD4870x2 you cannot compare to air cooling, since there is no after market coolers available.
For the 4870x2, manufacturers are now releasing custom cooling designs incorporated in the cards (so no need to buy an aftermarket cooler and then install it). Take for example the recently released Asus 4870x2 with tri-fansink design, it looks like they've incorporated the award winning Accelero EXTREME http://www.arctic-cooling.com/vga2.php?idx=161, http://www.asus.com/products.aspx?l1=2&l2=8&l3=774&l4=0&model=2450&modelmenu=1. It runs 24 degrees cooler and at only 29 dB. What average drop in degrees centigrade could I expect on the 4870x2 with a water cooling kit?
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#8
Zehnsucht
by: jyoung75
For the 4870x2, manufacturers are now releasing custom cooling designs incorporated in the cards (so no need to buy an aftermarket cooler and then install it). Take for example the recently released Asus 4870x2 with tri-fansink design, it looks like they've incorporated the award winning Accelero EXTREME http://www.arctic-cooling.com/vga2.php?idx=161, http://www.asus.com/products.aspx?l1=2&l2=8&l3=774&l4=0&model=2450&modelmenu=1. It runs 24 degrees cooler and at only 29 dB. What average drop in degrees centigrade could I expect on the 4870x2 with a water cooling kit?
I have absolutely no idea. What I do know is how my 8800GTX responded with aftermarket cooler:
Stock - Idle 75 Load 95
Thermalright HR03+ - Idle < 45 (temp sensor stuck) Load 65 (Noctua 120 mm fan on max during load)
Water (se system spec) - Idle < 45 Load 50 (three fans on medium)

What should be pointed out that watercooling just to reach lower temperatures than air is almost useless. The only reason I did it was because it was fun as hell to mod a case (two actually) and install water cooling.
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#9
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
Awesome looking and quite low profile. The way it looks if you did WC this, you could theoretically cut the top slot bracket off if you always plan on watercooling. Save some space there. Wish the memory and mosfets were WCd as well.
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#10
tigger
I'm the only one
I dont really like acrylic on waterblocks anymore,i have heard too many horror stories about cracking and leaks.
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#11
Exavier
by: WarEagleAU
Awesome looking and quite low profile. The way it looks if you did WC this, you could theoretically cut the top slot bracket off if you always plan on watercooling. Save some space there. Wish the memory and mosfets were WCd as well.
WarEagle: or you could un-pin the mount of the dual-slot backing and use a singular one...much cleaner..seen it done @XS

Tig: I don't actually like the logo in green myself, unless that's just the photo..
I like the sexy sleek XSPC Razor style IMO..Delrin too..
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#12
Whilhelm
Yeah and the XSPC one is about 60 bucks cheaper.

The logo will be the color of the fluid you use.
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#13
philbrown23
all the block is is 2 mcw60 bases bolted to some delrin may as well just get 2 mcw60's and the heatsink and just use that, be about the same unless you buy the mcw60's on fleabay
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#14
eidairaman1
by: Zehnsucht
If you use the caldera water block the heat sink will also be cooled by the water.

HTC: Comparing GPU blocks is relatively pointless. All full cover blocks perform within a couple of centigrades from each other. And the restriction of newer blocks are also usually very low.

For the HD4870x2 you cannot compare to air cooling, since there is no after market coolers available.

And when talking about cooling GPU's, it's not like you can overclock it much further because you have the core at 30C rather than 60C. What usually limits GPU OC is the voltage to the card.
i was getting at fins on the block itself so it doubles as a air cooled sink aswell, because im sure most users Still use Case Fans in combo with water cooling to keep the core of the system cool and not single components.
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#15
jbunch07
Wow this is one sexy beast! I will keep this in mind for later!
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