Thursday, December 18th 2008

SilverStone Out With Low-Profile LGA 775 Cooler

With the introduction of the LGA 775 socket around half a decade ago, Intel introduced its very familiar stock cooler whose design remained essentially the same across generations of processors on the same socket. Intel however, later introduced changes to the size of those coolers with some of its 45nm Core 2 processors, along with other entry-level chips. SilverStone worked out a LGA 775 cooler, the NT07-775, that resembles it, albeit its design methodology circles around being low-profile capable, measuring 93 mm x 36.5 mm x 93 mm (W, H, D).

SilverStone suggests this cooler specifically for 45nm dual-core processors. Its construction is similar to that of the Intel stock cooler. It consists of a copper-embedded central contact base from which forked aluminum fins project radially in a somewhat spiral fashion. The 90mm fan rotates in speeds between 1200 and 1800 rpm and has a rated noise output between 15 and 23 dBA depending on the speed. The cooler will be available in January at a price of 20 EUR.

Source: TechConnect Magazine
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16 Comments on SilverStone Out With Low-Profile LGA 775 Cooler

#1
jaxxxon
why do they put a round base to a square processor? i'm new at this stuff, but that confuses me lol.
Posted on Reply
#2

Thats a damn good question haha.

These look good for sleeper rigs / downloaders, not much else though.
Posted on Edit | Reply
#3
smartali89
by: kyle2020
Thats a damn good question haha.

These look good for sleeper rigs / downloaders, not much else though.
I wanted to ask that question tooo :P
Posted on Reply
#4
MKmods
Case Mod Guru
by: jaxxxon
why do they put a round base to a square processor? i'm new at this stuff, but that confuses me lol.
Its 1000X easier to make round holes than square ones.;)

Again, BIG THANKS btarunr for the great posts. I was looking for a very low profile cooler to put in a low profile SFF case
Posted on Reply
#5
boogerlad
isn't that just the wolfdale series stock cooler?
Posted on Reply
#6
zads
by: boogerlad
isn't that just the wolfdale series stock cooler?
I think the wolfdale series has an aluminum core/contact surface, rather than the copper of this one.
This one also has what looks like a lower profile fan than the stock Intel Wolfdale.
I'll wait for the reviews on this one, but I'm not expecting very good performance..
Posted on Reply
#7
OnBoard
Looks quite identical to the one that came with my E7200. Obviously not the copper core, but rest. Will measure it.

edit: it is lower profile, that fan is much slimmer. Stock is 48mm or there abouts. Also the cooler part might be a bit bigger infact, as this one has 3mm square bottom cutout.
Posted on Reply
#8
steelkane
I put together a e7300 for a customer, & it came with a intel small cooler, but I installed a bigger stock one I had from my e6850, the temps were 98F idle, I wonder what they would be with this small fry. I have about 5 or 6 of the small fry's, if anyone need's one
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#9
csendesmark
Hit me, but this is an intel celeron reference cooler with copper core ...for me :D
Posted on Reply
#10
theJesus
This does look similar to the cooler that came with my e7200, but I'm pretty sure this one has a thinner fan. Either way, the copper core is probably enough to make it at least a little better.

I'd like to see a review of this comparing it to the stock coolers on the wolfdale chips.
Posted on Reply
#12
MopeyMartian
by: jaxxxon
why do they put a round base to a square processor? i'm new at this stuff, but that confuses me lol.
Because the processor core(s) generally reside in the very middle. The metal square you see is simply there to act as a heat spreader if necessary. As long as the copper is removing the heat fast enough a cylinder shape if adequate. Plus, it saves the company money to use less copper per unit.
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#13
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: ShadowFold
Great. More push pins..
push pins arent that bad
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#14
ktr
It looks like the stock intel cooler.
Posted on Reply
#15
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
think thats bad look up the Tt jungle 512
Posted on Reply
#16
zads
by: cdawall
push pins arent that bad
yeah, everyone seems to like jumping on the bandwagon to complain about push pins.
they are pretty efficient and do what they need to do..
if you're a technician building systems all day,
or an engineer like me swapping CPUs and memory multiple times per day,
they work out pretty well.
Posted on Reply
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