Wednesday, December 31st 2008

A-DATA Launches XPG Dual SSD 3.5” RAID Enclosure

A-DATA Technology Co., Ltd., a worldwide leader in high performance memory products, announced today that it is launching XPG Dual SSD 3.5” RAID Enclosure to expand its portfolio of SSD solutions.

The A-DATA XPG Dual SSD 3.5” RAID Enclosure is a complete RAID solution through the use of two 2.5” SATA SSDs and/or HDDs mounted on one standard 3.5” form factor drive cage. This multifunctional RAID enclosure can be used as two separate drives, as a redundant drive to protect against drive failure, combined to become one high-performance drive or combined to become one large drive. By utilizing the hardware DIP switch on the back of the unit or included software utility, all these different RAID configurations and more can be set in an instant. Connection via SATA or USB enables easy direct access.

Designed for both internal & external purposes, A-DATA XPG Dual SSD 3.5” RAID Enclosure is the best choice for storage expansion and backup solution.

Furthermore, A-DATA also offers a 2.5” to 3.5” hard drive enclosure (Dual SSD 3.5” Enclosure - without built-in RAID function) converting simultaneously two 2.5” SATAI/II SSD and/or HDD into a 3.5” one. Both products will be available by end of Q1 2009.

Source: A-Data
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8 Comments on A-DATA Launches XPG Dual SSD 3.5” RAID Enclosure

#1
mdm-adph
This is actually seriously cool -- has anyone came out with something like this before now?
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#2
lemonadesoda
This is only partly useful. I would imaging using the "RAID feature" within a RAID controller environment would be counter productive. RAID-on-RAID may be very suboptimal. Therefore what you get here is a "one disk" RAID function. With performance RAID 0, or mirror.

If this was seriously cool, they would have shown some performance figures. They didnt. Therefore it aint that great: probably a method to utilise "old" SSDs that are sitting on the shelves because no one will buy them anymore given the NEW performance parts recently released.
Posted on Reply
#3
mdm-adph
by: lemonadesoda
This is only partly useful. I would imaging using the "RAID feature" within a RAID controller environment would be counter productive. RAID-on-RAID may be very suboptimal. Therefore what you get here is a "one disk" RAID function. With performance RAID 0, or mirror.

If this was seriously cool, they would have shown some performance figures. They didnt. Therefore it aint that great: probably a method to utilise "old" SSDs that are sitting on the shelves because no one will buy them anymore given the NEW performance parts recently released.
Hey, maybe they're still doing performance tests. Give them some time. :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#4

It isn't counter productive! The raid funktion is invisible for the moetherboard! ;)
Posted on Edit | Reply
#5
Mussels
Moderprator
by: moto666
It isn't counter productive! The raid funktion is invisible for the moetherboard! ;)
exactly!

yes, this would allow RAID on RAID. Of course theres room for the performance to be shit, but with SSD's involved isnt there room for it to be absolutely epic? Yes, the max speed will be 300MB/s (SATA-II's speed limit) but having two SSD's means a solid 300MB/s with uber low access times. I'd take one of these and two 64GB SSD's anyday.
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#6
lemonadesoda
^I'm not so sure. Just imagine the main (master) RAID controller doing a format, and telling a number of attached SSD's with embedded RAID to stripe.

I can just see that not working quite as you expect.
Posted on Reply
#7
Jizzler
by: Mussels
exactly!

yes, this would allow RAID on RAID. Of course theres room for the performance to be shit, but with SSD's involved isnt there room for it to be absolutely epic? Yes, the max speed will be 300MB/s (SATA-II's speed limit) but having two SSD's means a solid 300MB/s with uber low access times. I'd take one of these and two 64GB SSD's anyday.
I didn't look up the specifics of your board, but from your specs it looks like you're only using two of your ports for an HD and DVD? If it were me, would probably just use the motherboard's ports for RAIDing, since those ports are open (save money on raid-less carriers or 2.5"/3.5" adapters) and perhaps perform better.
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#8
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Jizzler
I didn't look up the specifics of your board, but from your specs it looks like you're only using two of your ports for an HD and DVD? If it were me, would probably just use the motherboard's ports for RAIDing, since those ports are open (save money on raid-less carriers or 2.5"/3.5" adapters) and perhaps perform better.
but then its locked to the RAID controller. this device gives you the benefits of RAID, while allowing you to plug it into any PC you want, and even use it over USB.
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