Friday, January 16th 2009

AMD Adds DDR2 Support for Embedded Geode Platform

Fairly invisible to the retail buyer, the Geode processor platform has been AMD's embedded computing product for several years in continuity. The Geode chip still finds use in embedded machines. Although the processor isn't in shortage and is available in both new-old stock or available on order by the chip-maker itself, the dated DDR memory it supports seems to be in short supply. To maintain memory compatibility with current memory standards, AMD added support for DDR2 memory.

The compatibility is brought about by a memory adapter and a new BIOS. The newer DDR2 memory will not enhance performance. It will make DDR2 memory operate at the data-rates of the older DDR standard, but will certainly keep the platform alive with support for the memory standard that's easily available in the market presently. The use of DDR2 memory is also expected to marginally reduce power consumption.

Source: TechConnect Magazine
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7 Comments on AMD Adds DDR2 Support for Embedded Geode Platform

#2
Castiel
What are those things used for?
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#3
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
I was wondering that myself. Geode processor hmm...maybe CE and stuff like that?
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#4
R-T-B
It says right on the article "embedded computing." That essentially means it is used is specialized applications like single board computers.
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#5
Error 404
Mining machines, science labs, airplanes.... those are the places where you can find embedded computer platforms.
That and the OLPC. :laugh:
This'll keep the Geode alive for a while longer.
Here's an interesting fact: the Geode is based on the old Cyrix 6x86 system-on-a-chip CPU, which is OLD.
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#6
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: Error 404
Mining machines, science labs, airplanes.... those are the places where you can find embedded computer platforms.
That and the OLPC. :laugh:
This'll keep the Geode alive for a while longer.
Here's an interesting fact: the Geode is based on the old Cyrix 6x86 system-on-a-chip CPU, which is OLD.
by: wikipedia
In 2002, AMD introduced the Geode GX series, which was a re-branding of the National Semiconductor GX2. This was quickly followed by the Geode LX, running up to 667 MHz. LX brought many improvements, such as higher speed DDR, a re-designed instruction pipe, and a more powerful display controller. The upgrade from the CS5535 I/O Companion to the CS5536 brought higher speed USB.

Geode GX and LX processors are typically found in devices such as thin clients and industrial control systems. However they have come under competitive pressure from VIA on the x86 side, and ARM and XScale taking much of the low-end business.

Because of the relatively poor performance of the GX and LX core design, AMD introduced the Geode NX, which is an embedded version of the highly-successful Athlon processor, K7. Geode NX uses the Thoroughbred core and is quite similar to the Athlon XP-M that use this core. The Geode NX includes 256KB of Level 2 cache, and runs fanless at up to 1 GHz in the NX1500@6W version. The NX2001 part runs at 1.8 GHz, the NX1750 part runs at 1.4 GHz, and the NX1250 runs at 667 MHz.
the early geodes were but the later are like wikipedia says a Athlon XP
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#7
Elijah86
I run a linux web server off my Wyse winterm 3200. 233Mhz Geode baby!
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