Friday, January 30th 2009

Intel SSD Roadmap Leaked

The guys over at VRZone have got their hands on the roadmap for Intel's SSD products. It has been said that Intel will be moving to a smaller fabrication process from 50 nm to 34 nm by Q4 2009 with capacities available up to 320 GB. The successor to Intel Turbo Memory has also been detailed, known as Braidwood and set for release in Q1 2010, it is said to, "provide SSD-like performance on second generation Ibex Peak chipsets like Q57, P57 and H57." Though to use Braidwood you will need, "Firmware support, Intel Rapid Storage Technology as well as the Braidwood module." These come in smaller capacities ranging from 4 GB to 16 GB, and will also be based on Intel's new 34 nm fabrication process. There is no official word on pricing as yet, but these new products are not expected to be cheap.


Source: VRZone
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14 Comments on Intel SSD Roadmap Leaked

#1
Homeless
I wonder how long it's going to take for these to become affordable
Posted on Reply
#2
Weer
You can already buy 64-128GB SSD's these days for 100-200$. Intel just asks too much.
Posted on Reply
#3
lemonadesoda
Braidwood integrated non-volatile cache sounds nice. I guess that means "instant" hibernate. Power off... actually means shift everything to the non-volatile cache... and shut down. Reboot means reloading the memory state from the "cache".
Posted on Reply
#4
abrictech
by: Weer
You can already buy 64-128GB SSD's these days for 100-200$. Intel just asks too much.
If you pay attention to details, there are performance differences among SSDs. You pay what you get..

Intel is currently the fastest SSD around, and many more challengers will emerge soon and bring down the price at higher spec.. A very good news for all.
Posted on Reply
#5
hat
Maximum Overclocker
I'd love to have all SSDs but it's only a poor man's dream atm. I got a 250GB and 500GB serial drive, and I think they're going to be here to stay for a long time.
Posted on Reply
#6
DanTheBanjoman
Señor Moderator
by: Weer
You can already buy 64-128GB SSD's these days for 100-200$. Intel just asks too much.
There is no official word on pricing as yet
How does your comment apply this this news article?
Posted on Reply
#7
hat
Maximum Overclocker
by: DanTheBanjoman
How does your comment apply this this news article?
ah, how does yours? Weer's contributes more than this comment did. He was trying to say that he thinks Intel solid state discs are too expensive in comparison with the others available.
Posted on Reply
#8
DanTheBanjoman
Señor Moderator
by: hat
ah, how does yours? Weer's contributes more than this comment did. He was trying to say that he thinks Intel solid state discs are too expensive in comparison with the others available.
He said you can buy them now for 100-200 and that that's too expensive. Now read the part I quoted from the article and you'll understand my question. How does my question apply? It's a response to his statement, it's called a discussion.
Posted on Reply
#9
hat
Maximum Overclocker
He said current 64 and 128gb SSDs, not the new ones on the roadmap. He was making a comment about Intel SSDs in general in comparison to other SSDs, roadmap or no roadmap. Well thats what I believe he was saying anyway, only he knows for certian.
Posted on Reply
#10
DanTheBanjoman
Señor Moderator
by: hat
He said current 64 and 128gb SSDs, not the new ones on the roadmap. He was making a comment about Intel SSDs in general in comparison to other SSDs, roadmap or no roadmap. Well thats what I believe he was saying anyway, only he knows for certian.
Exactly, and how does the current models being too expensive apply to the new ones which clearly state "price unknown"?
Posted on Reply
#11
alexp999
Staff
by: DanTheBanjoman
Exactly, and how does the current models being too expensive apply to the new ones which clearly state "price unknown"?
I think he is basically saying that Intel ask too much for their SSD's, I mention at the bottom, that there is no word on pricing, but they are expected to be expensive.
Weer's comment is basically saying that a lot of companyies are bringing out SSD's at much lower price points than Intel, so my interpretation of their comment is that Intel needs to justify the higher price tag, if it turns out to be as expected.
Posted on Reply
#12
hat
Maximum Overclocker
by: DanTheBanjoman
Exactly, and how does the current models being too expensive apply to the new ones which clearly state "price unknown"?
Well what do you expect the price to be if current non-intel SSDs are already at $100-$200? I would think expensive, a lot more expensive than current "cheap" SSDs.
Posted on Reply
#13
pr0n Inspector
by: Weer
You can already buy 64-128GB SSD's these days for 100-200$. Intel just asks too much.
those cheap SSDs are not much better than HDDs. they are the ones that are asking too much.
Posted on Reply
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