Wednesday, February 11th 2009

ELSA Japan and LucidLogix to Introduce High Performance Computing Products

ELSA Japan, a leading computer graphics solution provider and Lucidlogix (Kfar Netter, Israel, CEO - Moshe Steiner) announce an agreement to deploy Lucid’s HYDRA based chip in ELSA Japan High Performance products.

The companies have teamed up to transform high performance computing in the Japanese marketplace. For the first time, a product based on Lucid’s HYDRA technology will be used in a new line of ELSA Japan high performance systems for the HPC, broadcast and medical markets.

End of Mar 2009, The new solution will allow ELSA to provide a cost affective solution based on multi GPUs from any vendor. First products will feature dual and quad GPU configurations.

By combining Lucid’s component with Elsa Japan’s PCI-Express end-point device and remote graphics offering, a fully scalable and flexible system can be achieved for the first time at affordable price points.

“We are pleased to partner with ELSA, which has the reputation for providing leading performance computing solutions to the Japanese market. ELSA’s selection of Lucid products for graphics and high performance computing platforms demonstrates our commitment to deliver a unique and powerful parallel processing architecture,” said Offir Remez, President of Lucid. “HYDRA technology will allow ELSA to combine multiple GPUs on one device, for efficient, high performance in compute intensive, large scale visualization scenarios.”

"Partnership with Lucid is very important for our customers who require high performance computer. We can provide scalable performance and configurable solutions to break through the performance barrier.” said Jun Nagai, president, ELSA Japan Inc.Source: ELSA
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17 Comments on ELSA Japan and LucidLogix to Introduce High Performance Computing Products

#1
Exavier
how would one go about utilising this? is it like an external rendering box?
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#2
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Exavier
how would one go about utilising this? is it like an external rendering box?
Yes, something like that, there will be a high-bandwidth connection of some sort between the box and the host-machine. There's already talk of Intel using the Hydra engine on its next-gen Skulltrail motherboard that hypothetically lets you use any combination of video-cards.
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#3
PCpraiser100
They look like good computers to be folding farms.
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#4
Johnytxtc
I think its just an eleberate fan heater
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#5
jbunch07
by: btarunr
Yes, something like that, there will be a high-bandwidth connection of some sort between the box and the host-machine. There's already talk of Intel using the Hydra engine on its next-gen Skulltrail motherboard that hypothetically lets you use any combination of video-cards.
Fiber optics maybe? Sounds like you would need a connection with plenty of bandwidth.

Looks intriguing.
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#6
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
Are they meant to be gtx295's if so they only have one 6 pin connector :p
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#7
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
i wonder how much gpu power is needed for one of this real-time MRI rendering computers. I bet something like this could truly increase image clarity.
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#8
iamverysmart
by: DrPepper
Are they meant to be gtx295's if so they only have one 6 pin connector :p
They obviously are not GTX295's. They don't have video outputs.
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#9
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: DrPepper
Are they meant to be gtx295's if so they only have one 6 pin connector :p
Next generation Tesla HPC.

On this board, you can go ahead and pair four GTX 295 cards, four HD 4870 X2 cards, pretty-much any combination of PCI-Express graphics cards. No SLI/CFX cables needed, graphics processing remains abstract to the application.
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#10
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
by: iamverysmart
They obviously are not GTX295's. They don't have video outputs.
I meant tesla cards based on the gtx295

by: btarunr
Next generation Tesla HPC.

On this board, you can go ahead and pair four GTX 295 cards, four HD 4870 X2 cards, pretty-much any combination of PCI-Express graphics cards. No SLI/CFX cables needed, graphics processing remains abstract to the application.
Still its a bit wierd that it only needs one power connector.
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#11
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: DrPepper
Still its a bit wierd that it only needs one power connector.
Quadro CS, another card based on the G200b, needs only a single 6-pin connector.
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#12
douglatins
Yes, yes awesome computing power, but can it run Crysis?
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#13
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: douglatins
Yes, yes awesome computing power, but can it run Crysis?
Yes, depending on the cumulative power of all member graphics cards, whatever you throw at it.
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#14
jbunch07
I'm going to take an educated guess as estimate that a setup like the one pictured would cost 5-25,000 dollars? A little overkill for crysis, besides crysis is old news.
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#15
qwerty_lesh
one step closer to a real life matrix. :D
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#16
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
by: douglatins
Yes, yes awesome computing power, but can it run Crysis?
What can't run crysis these days :p
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#17
Jizzler
by: jbunch07
Fiber optics maybe? Sounds like you would need a connection with plenty of bandwidth.
Looks like a standard PCI-E cable port on that board.



Note: This is a diagram from a different expansion system, not the one from Elsa.
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