Saturday, February 14th 2009

S3 Graphics Officially Introduces Chrome 540 GTX, The World's Most Connected HD Card

S3 Graphics today announced the latest addition to its power-efficient Chrome 500 Series graphics processor family, with the unveiling of an 850MHz clocked GDDR3 based Chrome 540 GTX. Today's users can convert an ordinary PC into a Hi-Def entertainment powerhouse for Dual-Stream Blu-ray and HD videos, using the newly defined DisplayPort digital interface, HDMI and Dual-Link DVI for seamless connectivity to the latest digital monitors and HDTVs.

Today's multimedia enthusiasts require extra GPU horsepower to perform high-quality HD video decoding, image post-processing, and stunning color enhancement when displaying the latest HD content on Blu-ray or streaming video-on-demand. With the Chrome 540 GTX, you now have the power to bring every movie experience to life, and enjoy bonus footage through Picture-in-Picture, all while enjoying 8 channels of high fidelity audio with the S3 Graphics built-in Dolby 7.1 digital surround sound processor.

DirectX 10.1 and OpenGL 3.0 applications on Microsoft Windows and Linux platforms can be effectively run using the Chrome 540 GTX programmable shader cores to speed up 3D games, non-gaming rendering applications, and other visual processing functions using the built-in GPGPU engine.

Add-in cards featuring the Chrome 540 GTX, bundled free with WinDVD8 for Blu-ray playback, are now available on S3 Graphics GStore online retail outlet.

"S3 Graphics has continued to introduce new visualization technologies to the market by adding another feature-rich product to our growing portfolio of key graphics and display processors," said Dr. Ken Weng, GM for S3 Graphics. "Our new Chrome 540 GTX card brings features usually found only in enthusiast grade products to mainstream users, making the latest innovative technologies available to all."

Hi-Def Like Never Before
The S3 Graphics Chrome 540 GTX gives multimedia users the perfect balance of DirectX 10.1 / OpenGL 3.0 graphics performance, high-quality Picture-in-Picture Blu-ray playback, and a high-speed, high-throughput 64-bit GDDR3 memory bus interface running at 850 MHz. Display connections use the latest VESA DisplayPort standard, HDMI, dual-link DVI-I, and an optional CRT interface using a DVI-to-CRT dongle for the latest high resolution display support.

The Chrome 540 GTX incorporates a high performance ChromotionHD 2.0 video processor unit (VPU), advanced filtering, and clear-image post-processing to perform ultra smooth decoding of MPEG-4/AVC (H.264), MPEG-2, and VC-1 for Blu-ray and HD video. To further enhance operation for home theatre and CE applications that demand cool-and-quiet operation, the Chrome 540 GTX features PowerWise technology for Green Computing to "Reduce the Heat" without compromising performance, features, or quality.

More information on the S3 Graphics Chrome 540 GTX may be found on the S3 Graphics website here.
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46 Comments on S3 Graphics Officially Introduces Chrome 540 GTX, The World's Most Connected HD Card

#1
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
by: kysg
this is true but still the low end is a joke though, only benefits are for HTPC users money is mainly scored from the midrange dept.
Low end cards are good if you like playing old games :eek: I got one for a pc so if a friend is over we can play bf2 on lan.
Posted on Reply
#2
spearman914
LMAO, they're trying to make it look like a strong card but failed. PCB space = waste, compare that to the 4870x2 pcb :D
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#4
eidairaman1
16x - 1x adapter

talk about a bottleneck
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#5
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: cool_recep
What about this one:


That riser is for noobs (if it's not a joke). You can try cutting the edge of a PCI-E x1/x4 slot and and still install an x16 card.
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#6
eidairaman1
by: btarunr
That riser is for noobs (if it's not a joke). You can try cutting the edge of a PCI-E x1/x4 slot and and still install an x16 card.
lmao and it wont work heh
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#7
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: eidairaman1
lmao and it wont work heh
It will work. Period.
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#9
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: eidairaman1
tried it yourself?
Need not try to prove. It is an axiom.
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#10
theorw
by: btarunr
That riser is for noobs (if it's not a joke). You can try cutting the edge of a PCI-E x1/x4 slot and and still install an x16 card.
Its not for noob.Its a waste of money.As for the axiom,i wouldnt count on that cos in a mobo if the manifacturer didnt leave the 1x/4x slot open for vga then it most likely wont work if u cut it...And propably there will be a cmos battery or capacitors or other staff in the same line with the vgs's slot so u wont fit it unless u break something.Thats why that adapter also elevates the card...
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#11
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: theorw
Its not for noob.Its a waste of money.As for the axiom,i wouldnt count on that cos in a mobo if the manifacturer didnt leave the 1x/4x slot open for vga then it most likely wont work if u cut it...And propably there will be a cmos battery or capacitors or other staff in the same line with the vgs's slot so u wont fit it unless u break something.Thats why that adapter also elevates the card...
Nobody is discounting the fact that there will be components blocking the graphics card if it's installed in a place where a PCI-E x1 slot exists. If you can install that PCI-E riser, you already count the fact that there is clearance on the motherboard. You can open a PCI-E x1/x4 slot (cut a notch on its end), and install any PCI-Express expansion card, that includes PCI-E 2.0 x16. It will work, irrespective of the level of performance it ends up offering.
Posted on Reply
#12
Nick89
by: theorw
Its not for noob.Its a waste of money.As for the axiom,i wouldnt count on that cos in a mobo if the manifacturer didnt leave the 1x/4x slot open for vga then it most likely wont work if u cut it...And propably there will be a cmos battery or capacitors or other staff in the same line with the vgs's slot so u wont fit it unless u break something.Thats why that adapter also elevates the card...
Cutting the egde works. BTA is right.
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#13
Mussels
Moderprator
by: eidairaman1
tried it yourself?
i've done it. card didnt get enough power for 3D (X1600) but it ran fine in 2D.
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#14
Pixelated
Too bad this thing only has a 64 Bit bus. Wake me when they release something with some power.
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#15
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
by: btarunr
That riser is for noobs (if it's not a joke). You can try cutting the edge of a PCI-E x1/x4 slot and and still install an x16 card.
Actualy on one of my mobo's this would be good because if i cut the slot the card would hit the chipset heatsink, I still wouldn't use it anyway.
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#16
Valdez
by: Mussels
i've done it. card didnt get enough power for 3D (X1600) but it ran fine in 2D.
How did you cut the slot? I've a mobo with a closed x4 slot, and maybe i want to throw a 8600gt in it.
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#17
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
by: Valdez
How did you cut the slot? I've a mobo with a closed x4 slot, and maybe i want to throw a 8600gt in it.
A file would be able to cut it.
Posted on Reply
#18
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator


See how the PCI-E x4 has an open-end? Try to carefully cut the end of your slot, be careful not to damage the delicate contacts inside. The cut should be deep enough to smoothly let the card in, but not too deep to damage its wiring.
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#19
Valdez
Thanks, both of you. I will try it someday. However i still have some warranty on my mobo, so i think, i'll wait until it expires.
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#20
Marineborn
wow thats a rediculous design, someone was not using there head
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#21
Mussels
Moderprator
the one trick to it, is to only cut the edge. the guy i did it for tried to make the cut 'better' by using a hacksaw, and sawing the thing til it was smoother. Of course, he pushed the saw in too far and ripped out the copper contacts.
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