Tuesday, April 7th 2009

OCZ Unveils the PC Power & Cooling Pro-Source 1500 UPS

OCZ Technology Group, a worldwide leader in innovative, ultra-high performance and high reliability memory and PC components, today unveiled the Pro-Source 1500, the first Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) from PC Power & Cooling. Built for absolute stability and reliability from one of the most trusted names in power supplies, the Pro-Source 1500 UPS is the cost effective power protection solution for today’s high-end enthusiast and mission-critical systems.


Designed by PC Power & Cooling to be fully compatible with all PC Power and OCZ brand PSUs, the Pro-Source 1500 UPS is your ultimate source of back-up power. The Pro-Source provides a pure sine wave output, versus the conventional square wave or “step” sine wave produced by lesser quality UPS units. A pure sine wave is essential to a professional-grade back-up power source, while an inferior “step” sine wave plays havoc with today’s sophisticated and sensitive power factor correction (PFC) circuitry, making it possible for your PSU to reject the back-up power source and shut down. A professional UPS should output the same quality of power that your utility line delivers, and the Pro-Source 1500 does just that, providing a clean, pure sine wave to effectively power your high-performance PSU during a utility failure.

“PC Power & Cooling has a long history of delivering premium power management solutions to enthusiast and commercial customers, and the Pro-Source continues that tradition by addressing customers needs for superior UPS,” commented Ryan Edwards, Director of Product Management for the Group. “The Pro-Source protects your investment by delivering a pure sine wave output for uninterrupted power to even the most demanding pc configurations in the event of an extended power disruption.”

The Pro-Source 1500 features ten minutes of back-up battery time at typical load (600W), and with 1500VA (1440VA with standard plug) and 900W it is powerful enough to provide back-up power to some of the most demanding of PC configurations. The software and the front panel both show Input Voltage, Output Voltage, Frequency, Load, Backup Time, and Temperature. The Pro-Source 1500 is compatible with all major operating systems including Windows XP/Vista, Netware, and Linux. The Pro-Source can send alerts to a computer through a USB cable and can be monitored remotely via email or pager alerts. When the UPS is running on utility power it is 97% efficient and there is an overload alarm to warn the user if the load is too much for the UPS to handle. The Pro-Source 1500 UPS uses three standard 12V, 7Ah rechargeable lead acid batteries that are easy to replace, and comes with an easy to follow instruction booklet and management software.

With a history of almost 25 years building long-lasting, investment-grade PSUs, PC Power built the Pro-Source 1500 using the highest quality components and circuitry to provide the highest MTBF rating on the market. Delivering continuous power to your high-end PSU, the Pro-Source offers one the industry's most powerful yet affordable high-end UPS on the market, at a price point 40% less than a comparable unit in its class. The Pro-Source 1500 is backed by a 3-Year warranty commitment and the in-depth knowledge of PC Power & Cooling’s technical support.

Designed for high performance, enthusiast, and mission-critical systems, the PC Power & Cooling Pro-Source 1500 is the first pure sine wave, high output UPS retailing under $300.

For more information, please see the Pro-Source 1500 UPS product page.Source: PC Power & Cooling
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15 Comments on OCZ Unveils the PC Power & Cooling Pro-Source 1500 UPS

#2
Mussels
Moderprator
Hmm. not a bad idea for a PSU maker to make UPS's.
Posted on Reply
#3
adrianx
look like backups pro from APC.....

but... I dont play with UPS.... I love APC... :)
Posted on Reply
#4
to6ko91
under 300 not bad :cool:
Posted on Reply
#5
TreadR
I'm wondering why they haven't come out with a way to power the PSU with DC during backup power, bypassing AC-DC conversion? IDK... when I first saw "OCZ" and "UPS" in the title, that was the first thing that popped into my mind.

But, like people already said,
Don't play with UPS! APC.

Hm... nice ad, Mussels! :)
Posted on Reply
#6
BazookaJoe
I have seen Photos of PSU's that have DC cables to connect to a battery, But I have no idea where to get them.

I've also seen them deployed on boats to run standard PC's

Google also uses PSU's with Battery Backup directly In line in their servers (Google recent declassification of google server architecture) - it's FARRRRR More efficient, than trying to re-create AC from the DC battery in the UPS just to turn it back to DC again for your PC to use as all normal UPS's do...

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-10209580-92.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-20

You get WAY more backup time by running from the battery directly. (And yes it's quite astounding that more PSU manufacturers haven't already jumped allover this)
Posted on Reply
#7
kiriakost
Hold your horses BazookaJoe ... :)

The average user haves other needs , like to keep alive , a monitor screen plus an ADSL box , speakers and other stuff .

And the main Goal its not to keep them only alive , but also protected by possible issues of the main power line.


I have pay almost 500 EUR for one 1000W APC unit , that can get about five external power packs , and holds for three days the system alive.

The current OCZ offer , can do about 50 minutes , and thats it .

The bottom line are , that non of the three solutions are equally comparable.

Also , it looks that the OCZ uses three batteries .
This battery pack cost from 90 to 120 $ ( cheap or best batteries) .

There are more in to play , when some one moves, in to such solutions .

http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?t=86495&highlight=APC
Posted on Reply
#8
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I paid under $200 for my 1500VA CyberPower almost 6 months ago...
Posted on Reply
#9
BazookaJoe
by: kiriakost
Hold your horses BazookaJoe ... :)

The average user haves other needs , like to keep alive , a monitor screen plus an ADSL box , speakers and other stuff .

And the main Goal its not to keep them only alive , but also protected by possible issues of the main power line.


I have pay almost 500 EUR for one 1000W APC unit , that can get about five external power packs , and holds for three days the system alive.

The current OCZ offer , can do about 50 minutes , and thats it .

The bottom line are , that non of the three solutions are equally comparable.

Also , it looks that the OCZ uses the same onboard pack of batteries that my APC comes with.
This battery pack cost from 100 to 200 $ ( cheap or best batteries) .

There are more in to play , when some one moves, in to such solutions .

http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?t=86495&highlight=APC
Whilst your points are valid, they are not relevant to the question that was asked IE:

"I'm wondering why they haven't come out with a way to power the PSU with DC during backup power, bypassing AC-DC conversion?"

My answer is that they HAVE, and that a direct DC power is far more efficient and lasts longer than a UPS, per battery, NO-MATTER HOW GOOD YOUR UPS IS, because AC Inversion is a loss-full process by the very nature of what you are doing.

That is the very reason that Google use the system in the first place.

I'm sure not having a powered monitor will be a problem for most casual gamers, but you also have to remember that these batteries are 12V and can directly power many ADSL routers / network hubs. (their power bricks Generally supply 6~12 v - but they mostly all regulate that down to 5v before they use it, and if you give them 12v they still ((usually)) work just fine even if they don't originally have a 12 v power brick)

Beyond this - if you where somebody who EXPECTED unreliable power for whatever reason or location that you where choosing to use a PC, or may NEED to use a PC to do your job in places OTHER than your home - 12V monitors are ALSO available - and now your entire PC solution can run off of a single common rail of DC batteries.

As such being able to power your PC / Routers off of batteries may be very useful to many many people OTHER than gamers, people who may not worry so much about keeping a monitor or speakers online , and rather worry about about continued service, be it a network machine, a renderer, or many other applications that require a PC to run continually uninterrupted.

I recently worked a contract with a major cellular service provider in my country - they also have amazing inverters with external battery packs that can keep an entire radio site running for days and days, but the question was specifically regarding hybrid AC / DC power supplies, not long term alternate inverters & battery setups.
Posted on Reply
#10
Polarman
looks similar to my APC VA-1500. Bet it weighs a ton too.
Posted on Reply
#11
kiriakost
by: Polarman
looks similar to my APC VA-1500. Bet it weighs a ton too.
12Kg are just the batteries ... :)

So , i think it will be a 20Kg total .

My is even heavier (30Kg) , due the larger transformer inside , able to charge a train of batteries.
Thats why i have build a small trolley for it .

EDIT : oups my mistake ....
3 standard 12V, 7Ah rechargeable batteries
Less standby time ... less weight ..

i got mixed , that it had two 17 Ah as batteries .... so this is smaller than the APC line .
And has only a large case .
Posted on Reply
#12
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
would definitely grab one of these puppies. APC may be the defacto but they are also sometimes cheaply made :)
Posted on Reply
#13
TreadR
by: BazookaJoe
My answer is that they HAVE
I was referring to OCZ and PCP&C... since they build both PSU's and UPS's, why not create something like that. Besides, you're referring to industrial equipment, whether used on boats or by Google... it will still be to expensive for the average user to implement.
Posted on Reply
#14
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
it is smart for a PSU company to make UPS however under $300 is expensive unless we are talking 1000 watts. APC for $200 makes a real nice 700watt/1200VA UPS that has been incredibly reliable for me.
Posted on Reply
#15
BazookaJoe
by: TreadR
I was referring to OCZ and PCP&C... since they build both PSU's and UPS's, why not create something like that. Besides, you're referring to industrial equipment, whether used on boats or by Google... it will still be to expensive for the average user to implement.
Although Google DO use their own special industrial designs, the PSU I saw on a boat belonged to a gentleman from another country who was visiting, and was a standard PSU in a standard destktop midi tower case, with a standard ac power cable connection as well as a DC IN connection.

He said he had found it somewhere online, and it was roughly the same price as any other PSU but only seemed to come in 360w models (I would assume you could make one of these to whatever spec you like, if you where a PSU manufacturer - but this website only had 360's), and that it had seemed perfect for his boat PC as he has a generator on board, but should it fail he can still run his PC for a quite considerable length of time on the boat batteries, and that such a setup had been significantly cheaper than buying a laptop of similar specifications.

The fellow was soon on his way (as the boating types are) and I never did find the website that sold this PSU :

I only said so earlier as that sounds to be the exact type of device that you seemed to be asking about.

My mistake.
Posted on Reply
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