Saturday, May 9th 2009

Samsung Introduces New Slim Touch of Color LCD Monitors

Samsung Electronics America, a subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Corporation, the number one worldwide brand of LCD display products, today announced the release of its 70 Series Monitors: the P2070, P2370 and P2370HD. These slim LCD monitors, with screen depths of 30 mm (1.18 inches) for the P2070 and P2370 and 65.5mm (2.58 inches) for the P2370HD and Touch of Color (ToC) design, are the latest release of Samsung’s high performance displays.
“The 70 Series offers our customers a sophisticated-looking LCD monitor with the performance capability of our televisions,” said J.H. Kim, President of Samsung Electronics America’s Information Technology Division. “The 70 Series is the new standard as more people upgrade their monitors for additional uses, like watching television programs and playing video games.”


The 70 Series Monitors are ideal for office applications and entertainment with its dynamic contrast ratio (50,000:1) for deep, rich colors, while the 2ms (GTG) video response time minimizes blurring for watching sports and fast-moving gameplay. The crystal-like bezel frame with ToC reduces the reflection of light and glare. The glossy stand offers a polished design, while the clear, crystal-like acrylic neck gives the illusion the monitor is floating.

Samsung’s Startlight Touch Controls integrate the On Screen Display (OSD) buttons into the bezel for a seamless look and feel, eliminating obtrusive buttons on the front or sides on the panel. Gently touching any of the buttons illuminates the controls which automatically disappear after a set period of time, minimizing distractions.

The P2370 offers full HD 1080p resolution (1920x1080) for optimized viewing of HD content. For full HDTV capability, the P2370HD builds on the 1080p capabilities of the P2370 with the addition of a HDTV tuner, integrated speakers with SRS TruSurround HD(r) and remote control. In addition, the P2370HD also has HDMI and component inputs for additional connections such as Blu-Ray, set-top boxes and game consoles providing users with a display that is ready for work and play.

“The 70 Series is a great monitor for someone looking a full range of color, sharpness and response. It also has an added benefit for those concerned about the environment. We were sensitive to the impact computers monitors have on the environment and have developed a manufacturing process for the 70 Series that would minimize this,” said Tony Yu, Display Product Manager of Samsung Electronics America’s Information Technology Division.

The 70 Series offers a suite of eco-conscious features including reduced energy consumption, requiring about a third less power to operate compared to typical monitors of similar size. The ToC manufacturing process eliminates harmful paints and sprays, increasing the monitors’ recyclability. The slim footprint also dramatically reduces transportation costs and requirements for a smaller carbon footprint.

P2070 P2370 P2370HD LCD Monitors
  • Thin 30 mm screen depth (65.5 mm - P2370HD)
  • High contrast ratio of 50,000:1
  • Full HD 1080p (1920x1080) resolution (1600x900 – P2070)
  • Fast 2ms (GTG) video response time (5 ms – P2370HD)
  • Reduced power consumption
  • Touch of Color (ToC) technology
  • VOC-free Crystal-like bezel frame to help reduce glare
  • Starlight Touch Controls
  • Built-in 1080p digital HDTV tuner; 5 ms (GTG) video response time and HDMI input (P2370HD)
All monitors are available through Samsung resellers and distribution channels, which can be located by calling 1-800-SAMSUNG or by visiting www.samsung.com. Samsung Power Partners receive special promotions, lead referrals, training and technical support, as well as collateral and marketing materials. To find out more about becoming a Samsung Power Partner, visit www.samsungpartner.com.Source: BusinessWire
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41 Comments on Samsung Introduces New Slim Touch of Color LCD Monitors

#1
Mussels
Moderprator
Blurring the line between monitor and TV, thats for sure.
Posted on Reply
#2
Mega-Japan
That definitely looks nice, no doubt about it.

But I'd like to know... whatever happened about that new 16:9 resolution that was supposed to become a standard? With a resolution 20XX x 11XX. Because there's no point on getting a 16:9 1080p when a 16:10 1200p/1600p has more resolution.
Posted on Reply
#3
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Mega-Japan
That definitely looks nice, no doubt about it.

But I'd like to know... whatever happened about that new 16:9 resolution that was supposed to become a standard? With a resolution 20XX x 11XX. Because there's no point on getting a 16:9 1080p when a 16:10 1200p/1600p has more resolution.
16:10 has basically died. 16:10 came out because it was cheaper.

Factories set to make 1600x1200 panels, could reuse the tech to make 1920x1200 panels. Now that tech has revved up on the TV side of things for 1080P, 1080P is cheaper so 16:10 is slowly being phased out.

Higher res will come out sooner or later in 16:9, but that will take another year or two at least.
Posted on Reply
#4
Weer
by: Mussels
16:10 has basically died. 16:10 came out because it was cheaper.

Factories set to make 1600x1200 panels, could reuse the tech to make 1920x1200 panels. Now that tech has revved up on the TV side of things for 1080P, 1080P is cheaper so 16:10 is slowly being phased out.

Higher res will come out sooner or later in 16:9, but that will take another year or two at least.
The resolution of my 3007WFP-HC is 16:10, and for the average consumer, this is better. With 24 inch 1080p monitors, you have less pixels stretched across the same space.

It doesn't even matter. The industry will go forward until 30 inch monitors are affordable, or until they figure out that you can't run a 30 inch monitor with a TN panel.
Since 1080p has become standard, it is no longer important, and the 30 inch monitors are what decide the fate of the industry. So far, they're only 16:10. Everything always goes up.
Posted on Reply
#5
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Weer
The resolution of my 3007WFP-HC is 16:10, and for the average consumer, this is better. With 24 inch 1080p monitors, you have less pixels stretched across the same space.
Better for whom? the TV and movie industry uses 16:9, and thats whats driving the screens. 16:9 has already won that field, so thats what new monitors are going to be made for. your 30" dell is rather old. It might be awesome and have great specs, but its still 'old' technology.

Also, get your facts straight. I have one of those monitors, and there aint any stretching whatsoever. your monitor is the one that does stretching or scaling with black bars, when watching widescreen movies and TV.

by: Weer

It doesn't even matter. The industry will go forward until 30 inch monitors are affordable, or until they figure out that you can't run a 30 inch monitor with a TN panel.
Since 1080p has become standard, it is no longer important, and the 30 inch monitors are what decide the fate of the industry. So far, they're only 16:10. Everything always goes up.
30" monitors decide the fate of the industry? why the hell would they do that.
Posted on Reply
#6
Wile E
Power User
by: Mussels
Better for whom? the TV and movie industry uses 16:9, and thats whats driving the screens. 16:9 has already won that field, so thats what new monitors are going to be made for. your 30" dell is rather old. It might be awesome and have great specs, but its still 'old' technology.

Also, get your facts straight. I have one of those monitors, and there aint any stretching whatsoever. your monitor is the one that does stretching or scaling with black bars, when watching widescreen movies and TV.



30" monitors decide the fate of the industry? why the hell would they do that.
He means that there are less pixels in the same amount of space, meaning they are spaced out further.

And actually, neither 16:9 nor 16:10 are proper for movies. Movies are actually much wider in aspect.

And I don't think 16:10 is going anywhere. It's still better for productivity than 16:9, no matter how you look at it. More resolution, is still better. Movies are a secondary consideration.
Posted on Reply
#7
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Wile E
Actually, neither 16:9 nor 16:10 are proper for movies. Movies are actually much wider in aspect.

And I don't think 16:10 is going anywhere. It's still better for productivity than 16:9.
DVD movies, and many (not all, thats for sure) Blu ray movies are 16:9. They may not be FILMED in that aspect ratio, but thats what they are when you buy them.

16:10 is already going away... look at the news posts recently (last 2-3 months) we've seen 16:9 after 16:9. I cant even recall the last time a company announced a new 16:10 screen.
Posted on Reply
#8
Wile E
Power User
by: Mussels
DVD movies, and many (not all, thats for sure) Blu ray movies are 16:9. They may not be FILMED in that aspect ratio, but thats what they are when you buy them.

16:10 is already going away... look at the news posts recently (last 2-3 months) we've seen 16:9 after 16:9. I cant even recall the last time a company announced a new 16:10 screen.
There have been a bunch of 16:10 released. They just aren't the current rage right now, so you don't hear headlines about them. Almost every manufacturer has released an updated 16:10 line this year.

And to point something else out, all of these 16:9 monitors are Tn-Film. Unless they release these in M/PVA or IPS, 16:10 will never go away. Pros won't buy a Tn-Film panel.

And no, most BD's are not in 16:9, check again. Most of them still letterbox on a 16:9 screen.
Posted on Reply
#9
Weer
by: Mussels
Better for whom? the TV and movie industry uses 16:9, and thats whats driving the screens. 16:9 has already won that field, so thats what new monitors are going to be made for. your 30" dell is rather old. It might be awesome and have great specs, but its still 'old' technology.

Also, get your facts straight. I have one of those monitors, and there aint any stretching whatsoever. your monitor is the one that does stretching or scaling with black bars, when watching widescreen movies and TV.

30" monitors decide the fate of the industry? why the hell would they do that.
Mussels, please. I expect better from you. We all do.

The TV industry uses 16:9, but HD hasn't even won half the market, in which case for viewing 4:3, 16:10 is most definitely better.
The movie industry uses 2.35:1 aspect ratio! All new movies come out in this, and frankly? The only way to watch that is with a monitor setup like mine, where you have two monitors beside each other. And that's not what the consumer wants in any case. It's their ridiculous idea and it's stupid.
What's 'driving' monitors is and has always been PC use. They come out with 1080p monitors exactly because it's cheaper, and everyone complains. For desktop use, there is no way around it - 16:10 is better.
My Dell 3007WFP-HC is "old"? What, just because it's 16:10? That means it's not old in any way, because the resolution that everyone wants for their desktops is 16:10. Watching movies on it is useless anyway because of the 2.35:1 aspect ratio.
I have my facts straight. You simply need to get your wits about you, friend. It doesn't stretch movies, it adds black bars, just like the 16:9 monitors when watching movies. The bars are just slightly bigger - big whoop. And what it does stretch is the desktop. You get an uneven pixel dot pitch because what once was 1920x1200 is now 1920x1080 on the same amount of space. I have a 1080p 24-inch monitor, and I know from experience.

As for your benevolent question. The direction in which any industry is going defines its future and fate. Since 24 inch monitors are the current 'generation', which is to say, the 'affordable' line of monitors have gone all the way up to 24 inches, the only place to go is 30 inches. Why? Because the industry is also determined mostly by resolution. You have 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28-inch monitors which all cost about the same because they use the same type of cheap-ass TN panel with the exact same amount of pixels, going up in terms of dot-pitch across the span. Now where are things going? 30 inchers. That will also be the end of the current phase of the industry, because no company will ever sell a monitor larger than 30 inches. The next phase? Probably lower dot pitch, but who knows. Point is, the goal now is either for everyone to be able to get 30 inch monitors, or to realize that that's not possible and move to the next phase.
Posted on Reply
#10
Weer
by: Mussels
DVD movies, and many (not all, thats for sure) Blu ray movies are 16:9. They may not be FILMED in that aspect ratio, but thats what they are when you buy them.

16:10 is already going away... look at the news posts recently (last 2-3 months) we've seen 16:9 after 16:9. I cant even recall the last time a company announced a new 16:10 screen.
That is utter bullshit. What is wrong with you today?

Blu-ray and HD-DVD movies come ONLY in 2.35:1 aspect ratios. For years people have been complaining about this and I even made the statement a few months ago that it is absolutely ridiculous that a modern-day movie takes up HALF of my WIDEscreen monitor. I mean hey, everyone knows that anything that doesn't black bars at the top and bottom of the screen isn't 'coo' right? Right?!

16:10 IS NOT GOING AWAY!
As much as you hate, despise, loath and want to bury 16:10 in your garden and have your dog shit on it, it's here to stay! The reason all the recent news posts regard 16:9 monitors, is because, JUST like the meaning design and worthless width of a monitor, companies now think that when people see the word '1080p' they will buy their products without thinking twice. The market is stupid, companies adapt. They could say '1200p (16L10)', but you understand how everything has to be marketed to the lower common-denominator, I hope. The truth is I wouldn't be caught dead buying one of those thin TN-panel monitors. They disgust me just as much as the useless 1080p resolution. Those 120 vertical pixels make a surprising bit of difference. Look at every monitor-manufacturing company. You'll see they DISCRETELY introduce 16:10 monitors and there will still be ones coming out in the future. 1080p is for idiots who don't know not to buy TN. Serious people, like me, only buy S-PVA or S-IPS. Which is why my monitors can NEVER become 'old'.. they're perfect forever.

Oh yes, also.. DVD movies? You want to watch 480p video on a 1080p monitors? That would look so bad, it wouldn't even be worth it to buy a DVD player. Not to mention that after looking through my small DVD collection, I see that about half of the movies I own are not 16:9. They're either too old and are 4:3, or too new and thus 2:35:1.
Posted on Reply
#11
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Wile E


And to point something else out, all of these 16:9 monitors are Tn-Film. Unless they release these in M/PVA or IPS, 16:10 will never go away. Pros won't buy a Tn-Film panel.

And no, most BD's are not in 16:9, check again. Most of them still letterbox on a 16:9 screen.
I never said that all BD movies are in 16:9. i said some.

Pros are a pretty small portion of the market. 99% of consumers dont even know there are different panel types.

The rest of this is for Weer: Thanks for calling my opinions bullshit. Thanks for saying you expect more from me. Sorry to say, but i dont give a damn. They are my opinions, and TPU's rules say i am allowed to share my opinion as much as i want so long as i dont insult other members. I've followed that rule, you just broke it.

Movies i have on hand in 1080P (REAL 1080P, no bars, no stretching) from the blu ray or HD-DVD format:

Office space
Get smart
Hellboy 2
5 Centimeters per second
paprika


Everything i'm saying is an opinion, which i can back up with facts or theories. All you're doing is offering me insults.
Posted on Reply
#12
REVHEAD
High end high res monitors will allways be 16:10, this is for cad ect, they wont go away, bluray has 5 years left on its lifespan, so that isnt a factor, super HD is on the horizon, this will require more space and higher res than BR.
Posted on Reply
#13
PCpraiser100
I was researching that last night, its an awesome monitor. 16:9 resolutions will be popular soon.
Posted on Reply
#14
ktr
Hopefully these Hybrid TV/Monitors have PiP. That is the only feature I miss on my LG...
Posted on Reply
#15
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
these look very nice we have had them at BBY for the past week and a half
Posted on Reply
#16
DanishDevil
Now that I buy my T260HD they have to release these =

cdawall, you wanna do a straight trade for a new one? :p
Posted on Reply
#17
a_ump
by: REVHEAD
High end high res monitors will allways be 16:10, this is for cad ect, they wont go away, bluray has 5 years left on its lifespan, so that isnt a factor, super HD is on the horizon, this will require more space and higher res than BR.
what is exactly super HD? is it the upgrade of HD, such as HD dvd's lost to blue-ray and now super HD will take out Blue-ray? what are the specifications of super HD as i just googled it like 4 different ways and found nothing.

and those monitors look nice, but i would hate to see all the finger prints after a week of owning it lol. i wonder what type of panel my lcd is...

EDIT: after some googling i found my monitor is a TN panel :( lol but idc, and i don't hold anything against TN panels as it looks just fine to me, though i suppose i would need to see a S-PVA/S-IPS to know the diff :rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#18
computerdeth
What happened to the P2370L???
I want the LED backlight one.
Posted on Reply
#19
Mega-Japan
After reading all the comments, forget 16:9, and forget 16:10. Industries should just move straight to Cinema aspect ration, 21:9, just like Pihilips pulled out that 46" 21:9 TV, so can other companies, and that would be DE shit.

I know people are not stupid enough that if they have a 16:10 Monitor of 1920x1200 they would go buy a 1920x1080 just because it's 16:9. That would just be very retarded. They would move to 2560x1600, which is yet another 16:10 aspect ratio. But if 30" monitors with a super high resolution like this on 16:9 ratio is released, that' what would rock.

Monitor technology is slow, until we get to see affordable OLED monitors like 5 years from now.
Posted on Reply
#20
lemonadesoda
Yep, i've seen the 21:9 Philips. Nice isnt is?

Re the Samsungs... notice the very stylish stand... but with very limited adjustments... I guess the manufacturers have realised there is a lot of cost in making adjustable stands, yet, most people dont make use of the feature and just sit the screen flat and square, 15cm off the table.

VESA mounts seem to be going out of fashion.
Posted on Reply
#21
a_ump
21:9? what kinda of resolution would that be?
Posted on Reply
#22
grazzhoppa
by: a_ump
21:9? what kinda of resolution would that be?
2520x1080
Posted on Reply
#23
Mega-Japan
by: grazzhoppa
2520x1080
Yup, and that would be this beauty right here:



One day, hopefully not too long from now, I'll get my hands on that beauty.
Posted on Reply
#24
PCpraiser100
by: Mega-Japan
One day, hopefully not too long from now, I'll get my hands on that beauty.
Me too.
Posted on Reply
#25
Wile E
Power User
by: Mussels
I never said that all BD movies are in 16:9. i said some.

Pros are a pretty small portion of the market. 99% of consumers dont even know there are different panel types.

The rest of this is for Weer: Thanks for calling my opinions bullshit. Thanks for saying you expect more from me. Sorry to say, but i dont give a damn. They are my opinions, and TPU's rules say i am allowed to share my opinion as much as i want so long as i dont insult other members. I've followed that rule, you just broke it.

Movies i have on hand in 1080P (REAL 1080P, no bars, no stretching) from the blu ray or HD-DVD format:

Office space
Get smart
Hellboy 2
5 Centimeters per second
paprika


Everything i'm saying is an opinion, which i can back up with facts or theories. All you're doing is offering me insults.
And just like you brush off my point about pros because they don't have a large market share, we can brush off your example of 16:9 BD's, because they are also the vast minority.

The fact of the matter is, the only thing 16:9 is better at is a select few movies. Every single other computer related task is better served by 16:10. Which puts 16:9 movies in an even bigger minority still. 1920x1200 vs 1920x1080 doesn't seem like a tough choice to me, especially considering 1920x1200 DOES 1920x1080 natively.

16:9 may be all the rage right now, but it will not replace 16:10.
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