Tuesday, May 19th 2009

Intel Announces Development of Ultra Low Voltage Video Encoding Accelerator

Intel announced that its researchers have crossed an important milestone in the ongoing Tera-Scale project the company flagged-off last year. The company has just developed an ultra low voltage special-purpose video encoding accelerator. Built on the 65 nm CMOS, the device could accelerate video compression, and encoding at speeds in excess of 10-times that of what general-purpose execution manages while consuming as low as 220mV. The company however, did not go into specifics on products based on the technology.

Source: Intel
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10 Comments on Intel Announces Development of Ultra Low Voltage Video Encoding Accelerator

#3
R_1
Can it be used in full HD video cameras? Sanyo has such full HD 60FPS, progressive camera.
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#4
pjl321
End of over night encoding?

It’s nice to see Intel heading in the right direction with encoding, which is basically the GPU route.

As for Sanyo 1080p at 60fps, that should be massively improved but it’s all about software support. I am guessing that it writes it to Stream Folder as .MTS files so if there is going to be any support at all then this should be supported.

Do you have the new Sanyo then? How are you finding the image stabilisation? I was all ready to snap one of those up but heard really bad things about tripod only filming. I want something for skiing and so need very good image stabilisation but the 60p would have been so good so this and any fast moving sport filming.
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#5
lemonadesoda
by: pjl321
It’s nice to see Intel heading in the right direction with encoding, which is basically the GPU route.
This is actually the transputer route... first attemped in the 80's... and now coming to practical implementation with Larrabee and this.
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#6
iStink
by: pjl321
It’s nice to see Intel heading in the right direction with encoding, which is basically the GPU route.

As for Sanyo 1080p at 60fps, that should be massively improved but it’s all about software support. I am guessing that it writes it to Stream Folder as .MTS files so if there is going to be any support at all then this should be supported.

Do you have the new Sanyo then? How are you finding the image stabilisation? I was all ready to snap one of those up but heard really bad things about tripod only filming. I want something for skiing and so need very good image stabilisation but the 60p would have been so good so this and any fast moving sport filming.
you want to record 60fps 1080p video while shooting down a hill? That sounds expensive lol
Posted on Reply
#7
Steevo
I love my Canon HG20, other than the price I got hosed on. The first thing I learned was, the natural habit to point the camera down is not good when talking to other women and leaving the camera running. Apparently the wife didn't care for my 20 second crotch shot of a friend of hers.


And yes, the support for MTS and M2TS is a big thing, Windows 7 plays them naively, while Windows Vista doesn't and the codecs available are either poor quality, or expensive. Using Power DVD for hardware acceleration kills the Pixela software that I got with my camcorder.

My last pet peave is the lack of support from ATI on the AVIVO to transcode these formats. One more round of this and I am going green.
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#8
Hayder_Master
full blue ray view with ultra low voltage , that's cool
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#9
Basard
one day each core will mimic a brain cell, and they will have trillion-core cpus....
Posted on Reply
#10
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Basard
one day each core will mimic a brain cell, and they will have trillion-core cpus....
It's called transistor. There are billions, if not trillions of them in today's newest CPU/GPUs. :)
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