Wednesday, July 8th 2009

OCZ Unveils the Vertex Turbo SSDs With a Few Updates

OCZ Technology Group, a worldwide leader in innovative, ultra-high performance and high reliability memory and computer components, today released the latest addition to their premium Vertex solid state drive series, the Vertex Turbo Edition. The tried-and-true architecture and performance of the original Vertex has been upgraded to meet the demands of enthusiasts and other performance-seeking users who benefit from SSD technology. The Vertex Turbo Series maximizes the potential for ultimate productivity and state-of-the-art computing experience, by increasing both the host clock-speed and the SDR DRAM Cache to 180 MHz versus 166 MHz on the original series.


“OCZ is constantly looking for ways to advance our solutions, and based on feedback from our enthusiast consumers and top system integrators we looked for ways to further push the performance envelope in our popular Vertex Series of SSD’s,” commented Ryan Edwards, Director of Product Management for the OCZ Technology Group. “The new Vertex Turbo makes use of the fastest SDR DRAM cache available and a proprietary FTL level firmware that provides an even faster solid state drive for enthusiasts looking for the ultimate desktop or laptop storage upgrade.”

OCZ Vertex Turbo Series provides a cutting-edge design for enthusiasts looking to transform their desktops or laptops. Enabled by a proprietary firmware and 64 MB of 180 MHz DRAM cache, the Vertex Turbo Edition ramps up performance levels to new heights, while providing the snappy computing, longer battery life, and shorter boot-ups users have enjoyed from the original. The Vertex Turbo delivers best-in-class read and write speeds clocking in at up to 270 MB/s read and 210 MB/s write along with the lower power consumption and superior durability compared to conventional hard drives.

OCZ continues to pioneer the flash-based storage initiative, by offering a variety of performance options and expanding its reach to all areas of computing interests and system preferences. OCZ Vertex Turbo is the result of the latest breakthroughs in SSD technology that translates to enthusiast-class data storage enthusiasts have come to expect from OCZ. Available in capacities of 30 GB (32), 60 GB (64), 120 GB (128), and 250 GB (256), Vertex Turbo SSDs offers ample room for all your data and comes backed with an industry leading 3 Year Warranty and OCZ’s exemplary service and support.

For more information about the OCZ Vertex Turbo Edition SSD, please click here.Source: OCZ Technology
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21 Comments on OCZ Unveils the Vertex Turbo SSDs With a Few Updates

#1
Mussels
Moderprator
oh god, you can overclock SSD's....
Posted on Reply
#2
hat
Enthusiast
Hm... finally, it IS possible to overclock hard drives :p
Posted on Reply
#3
Mussels
Moderprator
by: hat
Hm... finally, it IS possible to overclock hard drives :p
i give it a year before the first manufacturer starts making a performance and a low grade model off the same hardware, and you can firmware flash to 'unlock' higher speeds...
Posted on Reply
#4
hat
Enthusiast
That's how it will be done... we will edit the firmware to whatever speeds we desire and see if it runs. There are already hdd stability programs aren't there?
Posted on Reply
#5
lemonadesoda
by: Mussels
oh god, you can overclock SSD's....
Think of the data risk from "crashing" your SSD!!!!
Posted on Reply
#6
hat
Enthusiast
I'd imagine there would be some way of testing for stability... like occt but for hard drives. I probably wouldn't mess with it... just one more thing to go wrong, crash, cause weird problems or randomly fail... the graphics card is easy enough to stress on it's own and isolate it if it is causing a problem, there's memtest86+ for testing memory... if all that passes and there's still a problem it's likely that the cpu just needs a little love (voltage)... if that doesn't cure it, more voltage to NB, if that's not it than try fsb voltage or something.
Posted on Reply
#7
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
The stability test itself can fry your data.

Unlike Ye Olde HDDs, where if the controller is dead, you can simply swap the control PCB from an identical drive to recover data, you can't do it with SSDs. Everything including the NAND flash chips are soldered onto one PCB.
Posted on Reply
#8
Xajel
Prices please,

I think a $300 with 128GB - 256GB SSD with these performance is all what a customer like me need for his OS :D

sadly these performance and this size is still in $600+ price range !!
Posted on Reply
#9
hat
Enthusiast
by: btarunr
The stability test itself can fry your data.

Unlike Ye Olde HDDs, where if the controller is dead, you can simply swap the control PCB from an identical drive to recover data, you can't do it with SSDs. Everything including the NAND flash chips are soldered onto one PCB.
That's why you don't put anything on it until after you know it is stable. Who would put anything on a drive that's unstable? I always consider anything I do overclocking wise unstable until proven stable.
Posted on Reply
#10
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: hat
That's why you don't put anything on it until after you know it is stable. Who would put anything on a drive that's unstable? I always consider anything I do overclocking wise unstable until proven stable.
So it's like this. You can't overclock it when you have data (unless you're risking it). If you fry it, your RMA/warranty is gone anyway. So it's pointless stress-testing it.
Posted on Reply
#11
hat
Enthusiast
Who said anything about frying it? You said the stress-test would fry data, which I understand, but if I run a stress test on a drive and it fails (at stock settings) it was defective and thus should be accepted into RMA.
Posted on Reply
#12
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
You said stress-test to test the stability of an overclock. Of course, the company Quality Assurance will make sure the drive stands stress at stock settings. First of all, I'd like to see how you overclock these (without going through a long process of flashing the firmware). Each overclock step needs a long process.
Posted on Reply
#13
jagass
Thank you for sharing this article...
Posted on Reply
#14
hat
Enthusiast
by: btarunr
You said stress-test to test the stability of an overclock. Of course, the company Quality Assurance will make sure the drive stands stress at stock settings. First of all, I'd like to see how you overclock these (without going through a long process of flashing the firmware). Each overclock step needs a long process.
That's the only thing I can think of so far... flashing firmware.
Posted on Reply
#15
lemonadesoda
On reflection, this is a silly marketing gimmic. It only boosts the speed of the cache operations and not reading or writing to the core flash memory. But cache speed is not the bottleneck. Flash speed is, and cache SIZE is.

Gain? 64MB of cached data can be accessed 8% faster. The theoretic maximum gain in ideal conditions is therefore 64MB/270MB per sec = 0.237 seconds worth of data being pulled in 8% faster = 0.219 secs which is a GRAND TOTAL SAVING of 0.018 seconds. I dont think I would even notice that.

Any other data read/write, e.g. loading programs, games, virtual memory, etc. is bottlenecked by the read/write speed of the flash memory.

MUCH BETTER PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT IS GAINED BY:

1./ Faster flash memory. Oh yes, that's obvious, but "spun out" of the marketing
2./ Increasing the cache from 64MB to 128MB or 256MB
3./ Internal RAIDing of the flash memory
Posted on Reply
#16

Makes me laugh, all these people that go mad spending up to $1000 buying pairs of SSD's for e-peen value when a maker will simply release a faster, more brightly packaged model a few weeks later.
#17
Jizzler
... and those people have had been reaping the benefits for two weeks longer than the people who waited :)
Posted on Reply
#18
hat
Enthusiast
I wouldn't mind adding a 32GB SSD for my operating system... but $70 for 32GB just doesn't work for me
Posted on Reply
#19
Mussels
Moderprator
by: hat
I wouldn't mind adding a 32GB SSD for my operating system... but $70 for 32GB just doesn't work for me
i dont care if they start selling ones that are capped at 60MB/s, i just want a cheap silent one for my media PC
Posted on Reply
#20
Wile E
Power User
I want these high perf drives to come down to at least the $1.5/GB before I even START to consider them. They'll start to get my attention when 128GB drives are below $200.
Posted on Reply
#21
h3llb3nd4
by: Wile E
I want these high perf drives to come down to at least the $1.5/GB before I even START to consider them. They'll start to get my attention when 128GB drives are below $200.
I need it @ around $1/gb for me to even buy one...
Posted on Reply
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