Tuesday, July 14th 2009

Seagate Releases Cheetah 15K.7, Fastest, Most Efficient, and Highest Capacity

Seagate announced it is now shipping its technology-leading Cheetah 15K.7 enterprise-class hard drives into the worldwide distribution channel. As the highest performing, highest capacity 3.5-inch mission critical hard drive with best-in-class reliability for Tier 1 environments, the Cheetah 15K.7 drive is ideal for a wide range of server and storage applications. With the Cheetah 15K.7 hard drive, Seagate's technology leadership moves firmly past the competition as it delivers the industry's first 15K-rpm drive to reach the 600GB capacity point while providing record reliability of 1.6 million hours MTBF.

The Cheetah 15K.7 drive is available with the latest 6 Gb/s SAS or 4 Gb/s FC interfaces, and includes Seagate PowerTrim technology, which dynamically reduces power consumption. Together, these features enable system builders to deliver lower-cost, multi-drive servers and storage systems, making the Cheetah 15K.7 ideal for use in environments ranging from small and medium-sized businesses to the largest enterprises.

"Bell Micro's customers continue to require added capacity and performance for their server and storage systems, but many also must focus on finding ways to lower a system's total cost of ownership (TCO) or easily integrate new solutions using existing platforms," said Joe Cousins, vice president of Marketing at Bell Microproducts. "We're pleased to now offer the Seagate Cheetah 15K.7 family of drives that fill these critical needs. For users looking for the most advanced technology to create new premium systems, or those who are looking to extend the life of their existing systems, the Cheetah 15K.7 delivers the low TCO and promise of easy integration for businesses of all sizes."

Cheetah hard drives are the standard for existing enterprise systems. Cheetah drives are aimed directly at enabling businesses to sensibly grow and scale as their information needs continue, while at the same time providing the reliability required to avoid costly interruption or downtime.

For more information about the Cheetah 15K.7 drive, visit Seagate's Cheetah product page.Source: Seagate
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29 Comments on Seagate Releases Cheetah 15K.7, Fastest, Most Efficient, and Highest Capacity

#1
Mussels
Moderprator
if they release a SATA II version, i bet a lot of raptors and velociraptors would end up for sale in the B/S/T section.
Posted on Reply
#2
erek
The new Seagate Cheetah 15K.7 does
by: ds_cheetah_15k_7.pdf
Unprecedented performance with sustained data rate of up to
204 MB/s—a 16 percent increase over last generation.
:)
Posted on Reply
#3
Weer
by: Mussels
if they release a SATA II version, i bet a lot of raptors and velociraptors would end up for sale in the B/S/T section.
That's true regarding all of their products. But, they never do.

I fail to see how this beats an SSD.
Posted on Reply
#4
REVHEAD
by: Weer
That's true regarding all of their products. But, they never do.

I fail to see how this beats an SSD.
This is how
1.6 million hours MTBF.
No SSD right now would even come close enough in reliability to even consider putting in a server.
Posted on Reply
#5
Weer
by: REVHEAD
This is how No SSD right now would even come close enough in reliability to even consider putting in a server.
I see. I don't have a server.
Posted on Reply
#6
Nothgrin
by: Weer

I fail to see how this beats an SSD.
Self Encryption with a capable controller card and packs 600GB in 3.5" form factor.


Currently I have 2x 300GB Cheetah 15k.5 and one 300GB Cheetah 15k.6 they are all amazingly fast already and 15k.7 blows them out of the water... I have noticed that my 15K.6 is a little more quiet so I'm assuming 15k.7 also has some improvement on acoustics which makes a whole lot of difference in a data farm.

Heat is still a problem though both 15k.5 and 15k.6 still run pretty hot compared to my normal drives even with active/passive cooling.
Posted on Reply
#7
PP Mguire
Im with Mussels. If they released a version we could use i know alot of people who would jump on this. BUT it would have to be priced under SSD.
Posted on Reply
#8
Weer
by: Nothgrin
Self Encryption with a capable controller card and packs 600GB in 3.5" form factor.


Currently I have 2x 300GB Cheetah 15k.5 and one 300GB Cheetah 15k.6 they are all amazingly fast already and 15k.7 blows them out of the water... I have noticed that my 15K.6 is a little more quiet so I'm assuming 15k.7 also has some improvement on acoustics which makes a whole lot of difference in a data farm.

Heat is still a problem though both 15k.5 and 15k.6 still run pretty hot compared to my normal drives even with active/passive cooling.
My SSD blows your 15k.7 out of the water :D
Posted on Reply
#9
Kenshai
by: Weer
My SSD blows your 15k.7 out of the water :D
Not really if anything it is comparable.
Posted on Reply
#10
Nothgrin
by: PP Mguire
Im with Mussels. If they released a version we could use i know alot of people who would jump on this. BUT it would have to be priced under SSD.
You could buy a controller card and the HDD for under the price of an equivalent sized SSD.
And more motherboards are coming out with SAS onboard now so its picking up speed.
Posted on Reply
#11
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Weer
My SSD blows your 15k.7 out of the water :D
only in access times.

besides, an SSD will always fall behind mechanical drives in one thing.

(how fast they spin :D)
Posted on Reply
#12
Meecrob
by: Mussels
only in access times.

besides, an SSD will always fall behind mechanical drives in one thing.

(how fast they spin :D)
unless you count when somebody has one fail and hucks it out the window then it may spin faster for a time :P
Posted on Reply
#13
t77snapshot
600gb @ 15k.7!!! +1 for Seagate:rockout:
Posted on Reply
#14
PP Mguire
by: Nothgrin
You could buy a controller card and the HDD for under the price of an equivalent sized SSD.
And more motherboards are coming out with SAS onboard now so its picking up speed.
True that, you got some links? I might pick up on this but would want a PCI-E controller.
Posted on Reply
#15
Meecrob
check newegg, they got a few decently priced sas compatible controllers.
Posted on Reply
#16
Weer
by: Kenshai
Not really if anything it is comparable.
Don't make me laugh. A top-end SSD would crush any HDD, no matter if it's the absolute best or not.

And Mussy, access times are all that matter.. they're all that differenciate between HDD's and SSD's, and what it's coined as, is "speed."
Posted on Reply
#17
Kenshai
by: Weer
Don't make me laugh. A top-end SSD would crush any HDD, no matter if it's the absolute best or not.

And Mussy, access times are all that matter.. they're all that differenciate between HDD's and SSD's, and what it's coined as, is "speed."
Not really this drive keeps up with quite a many ssd's in transfer speed >200mb/s.

Find me a SINGLE SSD that can produce a number to "crush" the 200mb/s mark.
Posted on Reply
#18
Paulieg
The Mad Moderator
Would any of the speed be lost using a controller?
Posted on Reply
#19
Weer
by: Kenshai
Not really this drive keeps up with quite a many ssd's in transfer speed >200mb/s.

Find me a SINGLE SSD that can produce a number to "crush" the 200mb/s mark.
Which is completely worthless. bandwidth is solely dependent upon the number of drives. I RAID 0 my SSD, I beat the Cheetah in every way.
Posted on Reply
#20
Nothgrin
by: Weer
Which is completely worthless. bandwidth is solely dependent upon the number of drives. I RAID 0 my SSD, I beat the Cheetah in every way.
You forgot to mention that your SSD will fail sooner than the Seagate. :slap: SSDs only have a certain amount of read/write cycles. And since they push out massive I/OPS they take much less time to hit the error lifetime.

I agree that SSD is great for speed but really that speed is at the cost of reliability. Of course you already know this because thats why you would be RAID 0'ing it in the first place... And if your SSD is so much faster than your HDD than your HDD would'nt do much for your RAID 0 but for backup.

Let me know when SSD's are used for enterprise. Thats when they are stable enough to handle mission critical data and good enough for me.

by: PP Mguire
True that, you got some links? I might pick up on this but would want a PCI-E controller.
I'm using an Adaptec 2405 RAID controller. It's one of the cheaper SAS controller cards with decent specs.
Posted on Reply
#21
Weer
by: Nothgrin
You forgot to mention that your SSD will fail sooner than the Seagate. :slap: SSDs only have a certain amount of read/write cycles. And since they push out massive I/OPS they take much less time to hit the error lifetime.

I agree that SSD is great for speed but really that speed is at the cost of reliability. Of course you already know this because thats why you would be RAID 0'ing it in the first place... And if your SSD is so much faster than your HDD than your HDD would'nt do much for your RAID 0 but for backup.

Let me know when SSD's are used for enterprise. Thats when they are stable enough to handle mission critical data and good enough for me.
It's just nice to know my drive is faster than all your super-expensive server equipment :D
Posted on Reply
#22
ArmoredCavalry
by: Weer
It's just nice to know my drive is faster than all your super-expensive server equipment :D
Yah, but the money is better spent elsewhere, so who cares. :P

Storage has the highest costs for the least increase in performance when it comes to computer parts.
Posted on Reply
#24
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
by: Kantastic
Would the Cheetahs be better than 2 of these in RAID0?
Capacity, no. Sustained transfer, probably. Access times, definitely.


The reason why they don't release 15k RPM drives on SATA is because they are very expensive (I suspect these will be close to $1000 each), it only takes two of them to saturate SATA II bandwidth (375 MB/s for SATA II), and they are hot (few cases have proper cooling).
Posted on Reply
#25
Wile E
Power User
by: Weer
It's just nice to know my drive is faster than all your super-expensive server equipment :D
Yeah, except he has 10x the storage on a single drive, and would be just as fast at reading large files, and smoke your SSD in write speed, and be more reliable in the process.. Your SSD isn't so special, lots of cons for the benefit of faster access times. SSD's just aren't worth the price per GB right now for most people.
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