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2 routers, one network ... help?

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by copenhagen69, May 7, 2012.

  1. digibucc

    digibucc

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    except most home routers, switches and current nics have auto-mdix, so to say a xover is required for switch to switch or router to router is really not true. technically of course you are right but looking at hardware on the market, that technicality really doesn't matter much anymore.
  2. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Maybe I've been lucky, but I've been able to bridge computers using patch cables and bridge switches and routers using patch cables as well, but I'm not convinced that any modern day network adapter will struggle with it.
  3. Dippyskoodlez New Member

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    Really? I'm posting this through a router that does not. (This is usually devices that do not support 1000BASE-T)

    To say its "not true" is not true. Its 100% true.

    The devices convert the cable. (So yes you don't have to do anything, the cable is still effectively changing.)

    But when someone suggests doing something like this and end up scratching their head as to why it sorta shows connectivity, but wont pass data, it can save lots of time when they learn the basics instead of assuming.


    Assuming, in a network environment is bad. Because it will probably backfire and waste your time. The OP never states what router his normal wired connection is.
    Last edited: May 7, 2012
    digibucc says thanks.
  4. Completely Bonkers New Member

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    Copenhagen: thanks for your answers.

    I would suggest:

    1./ Use the wireless router as the main router and AP, it will be the DHCP server. Choose a subnet x.x.x.x
    2./ Set the appropriate wireless security
    3./ On the wireless router there will be a setting whether or not to allow WLAN connections access to the LAN. Disable access. Wireless will therefore only get access to the WAN port (internet)
    4./ Plug your current router WAN into the one of the wireless routers LAN ports
    5./ Set your current router to DHCP server. Choose a subnet y.y.y.y that is NOT the same as x.x.x.x
    6./ Set Internet IP Address as Get Dynamically From ISP. And Domain Name Server (DNS) Address as Get Automatically From ISP. Turn on NAT

    Now your current router connects indirectly to the internet through your wireless LAN, i.e. your wireless LAN is the Gateway. Your current router/wired LAN will run on its own subnet independent of the subnet offered to wireless clients. For example, your wireless clients could be on 10.x.x.x and your wired LAN could be on 192.168.1.x. Due to NAT the wireless clients wouldn't see your wired devices, unless you specifically uPnP or port forwarding to let them through to a specific machine, e.g. send them to a printer as all they can see.

    **Note**

    You could set it up the other way round, but IMO this is the simplest way to set it up and provide the chinese walls between subnets. I think you will also find it "educational" to set up your wireless router to be the "ISP" for your wired router. Helps you understand how it all works.

    Hope I didnt miss anything!

    The answer provided here:http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2622983&postcount=12 is what you would do IF you WANTED the wireless clients TO SEE and be exposed to your wired LAN. This is not what you wanted.
    Last edited: May 8, 2012
    copenhagen69 and stinger608 say thanks.
  5. copenhagen69

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    thanks so much bonkers ... going to order the router I linked earlier tonight and so I should be back next week when it gets here and let you know how it goes ...
  6. copenhagen69

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    I think I figured it out ...

    since I have no expertise in this area one of my buddies recommended a router that is wireless and hardwired that supports a guest connection.

    he says I can turn off the wireless stuff and still have this guest connection up and it can be blocked from accessing the network ...
  7. Completely Bonkers New Member

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    Yes, you can do that with some wireless routers... or any router that can run DDWRT. However, if you already have a fixed router, and a wireless router, using my earlier method you don't need to buy anything new, nor learn new (complicated) firmware like DDWRT

    IF you are buying new hardware, I would recommend a ubiquiti product like the airrouter.

    I personally have the Nanostation M2 which is a phenomenal product. Very happy with it. Their firmware is just as flexible and easier to use than DDWRT in my opinion. They are designed for commercial wireless, so their security and power (wireless range/distance) are excellent. With their Nanostation M2 I am able to capture a wifi signal and rebroadcast a new network on a different channel at much higher strength. Great for bridging applications.

    Don't forget to think about how you run your local LAN. Most routers are not the "fastest switches" and will only offer 10/100M LAN ports. You might want to consider a fast switch 1G for your wired LAN sitting behind the router you eventually choose.
  8. phanbuey

    phanbuey

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    All you need are some readily available tools and some time.
  9. remixedcat

    remixedcat

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    Lots of routers have guest networks to isolate the guest PCs from the internal LAN. they are called "Guest networks" or "VLANs" or "Virtual Servers"

    From there you can have your wifi on access point mode only as well...


    If you want the good range give that AMPED WIRELESS! one a try they have a new one with USB sharing and dual band now... I'm thinking of getting it...

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