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Adhoc fan testing

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by King Wookie, Feb 28, 2010.

  1. King Wookie

    King Wookie New Member

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    Well, I find myself having a few different fans in my hands right now, and while not having suitable scientific equipment or facilities to do proper testing, I think I've found a simple way to compare them.

    I take one fan, and connect it to a multimeter. Then place the test fan right up against it. Then connect power to the test fan. The better the airflow and static pressure, the faster it will make the other fan spin. And the faster the other fan spins, the higher the voltage it will produce.

    Not a reference test as such, but a quick and easy test. As for noise I will just have to give subjective feedback.

    The fans in question I'll list with results and impressions when done.
     
  2. surfingerman

    surfingerman New Member

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    this kind of test wont give you any relevant information, just go to the manufacturers info and look up the CFU of air it moves.. the amount of air the fan moves is going to vary depending on the air pressure difference inside and outside the case.. testing the fan outside the case will give you 0 useful results.. for instance on my case the inside pressure is so low one of my fans that is blowing air to the outside actually has air being sucked in because its not strong enough to overcome the pressure difference made by the other fans
     
  3. King Wookie

    King Wookie New Member

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    Sadly the figures most manufacturers give you are in no way accurate. And in some cases there are no figures available.

    As for the pressure differential in your case, it comes down to balancing the airflow. I match the airflow on my case by balancing input and extraction fans. Besides, no case is totally sealed,so if you have a negative pressure setup, it will pull in air through any available openings.

    As I said, this is not an empirical test, but the resistance of the 2nd fan will give some indication of a fan's static pressure capability. I could even do this with a rad mounted in between, to really see how a fan copes with the resistance to airflow.

    Besides, what is there to lose?:D
     
  4. King Wookie

    King Wookie New Member

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    Ok. Here goes. I used a Noctua S12- 1200 as my driven fan. All voltages were measured off it. The fan being tested was pushed right up against this fan.

    Audio assesments are just my personal impressions.

    Noctua S12-1200: 0.55 to 0.58 V. Very quiet, but battles with any restriction.
    Noctua P12-1300: 0.70 to 0.71 V. Fairly quiet, with a higher pitched whine.
    Cooler Master Silent fan S12 : 0.55 to 0.58/ 0.51 to 0.54 V. Tested 2. Reasonably quiet, but with an annoying clicking sound. Not very good with restrictive setups.
    Corsair PWM fan that comes with the H50: 1.00 to 1.02 V. Bit louder but fairy tolerable.
    Thermalright FDB 1300: 0.75 to 0.76 V. Reasonably quiet, but with high pitched "weedeater" sound. Bit dissapointing as I bought this based on another test I read. But not bad.
    Thermalright X-Silent: 0.59 to 0.6 V. Very quiet. Almost as quiet as the Noctua S-12 1200.
    Antec tricool : low - 0.15 to 0.30 V. Almost inaudable, but moves almost no air. medium - 0.65 to 0.67 V. Reasonably quiet. Ok for a case fan maybe. high - 1.12 to 1.15 V. Loudest of the lot. Not my favourite fan.
    Zalman ZM-F3: 1.49 to 1.5 V. As loud as the Antec on high, but shifts air! And when turned down to 1300rpm, moves more air and is quieter than the Thermalright FDB. And cheap! Vapour's review pegged these a while ago. And works quite well with restrictions.

    As I said, not really scientific, but just my impressions.
     

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