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Advice on setting up a wired/wireless network

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by KKSlider1337, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. KKSlider1337

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    Hi there,

    I've been having problems with my home network. Our current arrangement is to have a wireless 3com router downstairs (connected to ADSL), that leads upstairs by cable to a wireless Belkin cable router. From here it connects to the numerous systems upstairs, such as several Xbox 360's, computers etc. Problem is the Belkin router seems to have stopped working; it refuses to connect anymore and I can't access it through 192.168.1.1. It is around 6 years old I think.

    I was wondering what would be best to fix the situation. I recently heard about ethernet switches, would an 8-port one of these be a good solution? Also, the 3com router is really bad (at least the Belkin one was good while it worked) and needs resetting fairly regularly, and kicks lots of devices off after exactly 10 minutes for some odd reason, like the PS3, Wii, and DS. So a replacement downstairs router would be good. I wondered what you would recommend, for example this? http://www.ebuyer.com/product/52244

    And as far as switches go, how about one like this? http://www.amazon.co_uk/dp/B000087H94/?tag=tec053-21

    Thanks very much. :)
  2. copenhagen69

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    basically all switches are the same until you get into the highend stuff and they have little extras on them. So just get one with enough connections for you and that will be fine. I run a 4 port switch and it gets the job done perfectly for me. Although I dont have all those connections like you do :)

    As far as routers go, I have really only used Dlink Gamerslounge series http://www.dlink.com/products/category/?cid=12. Do they work better than normal routers? I can't say for sure but it does come with lots of nice goodies in the setup menus.
  3. KKSlider1337

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    Hmm, they look rather fancy. There don't seem to be many places in the UK that sell those. Just a good, basic, reliable router would be nice.

    So with using a switch, can all the devices connect at once without degrading the connection?
  4. TIGR

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    Yep a switch is a very simple, effective way to connect as many things as you need. On an 8-gigabit-port switch, every connected device has a full gigabit incoming and outgoing connectivity available to it, regardless of whether you're using two ports or all eight. Just plug in everything you want connected and wham bam shazaam! it just works.

    And I use wired as opposed to wireless connections whenever I can, for the transfer rate, security, and reliable connection.
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  5. dmbyer New Member

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    I'm pretty sure most consumer switches are actually shared throughput, so it would be Gigabit shared across all 8 ports. You need to get commercial switches to have full throughput on each port. Nevertheless, it's going to work for his needs :)
  6. TIGR

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    I see you're fairly new here; welcome to TPU, dmbyer! :toast:

    Someone can jump in here and correct me if I'm wrong, but to the best of my knowledge, the bandwidth is not typically shared. Different switches will label it differently, but look for the "switch fabric" or "switching bandwidth" and you'll see that, for examples, an 8-port gigabit switch will typically list 16gbps (example) and a 24-port switch will typically list 48gbps (example), suggesting that the switch is capable of delivering full duplex gigabit connectivity to all ports.

    However, there may also be some that do share the gigabit bandwidth (I really don't know), so it would be wise to check that on a switch before purchasing.
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  7. dmbyer New Member

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    Thanks for the welcome! :toast:

    I didn't know about the switch fabric, good call on that. Glad I stepped in so I could learn something new right off the bat!
  8. niko084

    niko084

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    You are pretty correct here.

    Most switches these days of even half decent quality will do their full speeds across all ports. Where they get into trouble is too many connections at once transferring high amounts of data.

    But the ole days of a 8 port 100mbps switch only handling a max throughput of 400mbps is nearly completely dead and gone, even with your cheap dlink, linksys, trendnets etc you find at most walmarts and targets.

    Now that that's been said, sorry for the OT, but where ya from TIGR?
    dmbyer says thanks.

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