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Am I getting the most out of my RAM?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Akumos, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. Akumos

    Akumos

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    Hello

    I was looking through CPU-Z and found that it gives you information on you memory as well. I noticed it showed my RAM speed as being 533MHz when it's advertised as 1600MHz and the motherboard has a 1600MHz FSB... Is this normal? Thanks!!

    [​IMG]
  2. n-ster

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    533mhz is really 1066mhz... all you have to do is set it to 1600 (800mhz) in the BIOS with the correct voltage and timings
    Akumos says thanks.
  3. Akumos

    Akumos

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    Cool thanks for the quick reply n-ster, i'll do that now!
  4. n-ster

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    After you finish putting factory speeds/timings/voltages, it is time to Overclock! If you are scared of overclocking or something, you could always overclock only on stock voltages...
  5. Akumos

    Akumos

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    Already done my processor. Got a Q6600 @ 3.00GHz on 1.4v.

    Can't find anything in the BIOS to directly change memory frequency though..i get these options:

    System Memory Multiplyer (SPD) with options such as Auto, 2.50A, 3.00A, 4.00A, 2.00D, 2.66D... etc

    then about 10 options regarding timings but no idea how to do that!!
  6. n-ster

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    What's your FSB atm? 9x333

    If you change the multiplier, does it change anything on th line after? (mem frequency)

    If so, can't you change it until it says 1600?
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2009
  7. Akumos

    Akumos

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    na, 362.5, multiplyer is on 8 so got a processor speed of 2.9 atm...

    this affecting the ram?
  8. crazy pyro

    crazy pyro New Member

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    Yep, FSB affects the speed of your RAM, if you double your FSB you get the actual speed of your RAM (well, you do for DDR2 anyway), you can use RAM dividers to allow a lower FSB to have a higher speed.
  9. n-ster

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    It changes the ration DRAM:FSB.... If you change the multiplier, does it change anything on th line after? (mem frequency)

    If so, can't you change it until it says 1600?
  10. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    Yeah, 533MHz is the base clock speed that your ram is running at. You double that to get the DDR speed of the ram (which is 1066).
  11. Agility

    Agility

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    The multiplier is FSB X ( Your options. Either 2.00,2.33 .etc)

    So if your FSB 363 (Round up), try 2.33. You should be getting 845Mhz ( Which is 1700mhz for your ram). Play around with your FSB or ratio.

    Just remember. Your FSB X (Multipler) then X 2 again to get the exact Mhz your ram is running.

    If you still don't understand, try this website

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_divider
  12. pbmaster

    pbmaster New Member

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    It's DDR3, which 533 x 3 = 1600..which is exactly correct.
    Technically 1599.9...but close enough :p
  13. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    I don't think DDR3 uses an x3 multiplier.
  14. Agility

    Agility

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    DDR = Double Data Rate (Something like that. Correct me if i'm wrong).

    The extra number after DDR is just the version of what type its running. So DDR4 or 5 is still X2. Unless you're talking about TDR? (Triple Data rate?) which isn't even planned yet.
  15. pbmaster

    pbmaster New Member

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    Oh well. Made sense to me lol
  16. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    Well, GDDR5 uses an x4 multi... and if his RAM is running at 533MHz base clock and it's 1600MHz ram you might have something there pbmaster.

    Any DDR3 memory gurus want to chime in?
  17. Agility

    Agility

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    GDDR is meant for graphics card. Our rams are using DDR. GDDR was never meant to be on the mobo.

    GDDR = Graphics Double Data Rate specifically for graphics card.
  18. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    I know that, I was just saying that it may be possible for DDR3 to use a x3 multiplier because other memory (GDDR5) has an x4 multiplier.
  19. Agility

    Agility

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  20. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    all thats happening is that his ram needs to be manually set.

    It probably runs 1066 on stock voltages, but needs to be overvolted to do 1600 - since ram cant automatically raise voltages, it defaults to 1066 so you dont get a no-boot scenario when you first plug it in.
  21. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    You are looking at the wrong tab in CPU-z.

    The SPD tab shows you the information that is flashed to the SPD chip by the manufacturer. Nothing on that tab tells you what speed the RAM is actually running at.

    The "Memory" tab shows you what speed and timings the RAM is actually running at.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2009
    Crunching for Team TPU More than 25k PPD
  22. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    It would seem that you have 1066 ram due to the PC rating. For example PC6400 is DDR800. Divide the PC rating by 8 to get the DDR rating. PC6400/8 would be DDR800, and PC8500/8 would be 1062.5 (pretty much 1066)
  23. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    his ram also has SPD timings for 1400MHz, which is why i think those are just "default" safe values.

    I've got samsung DDR2 here, which is 1110MHz ram, but since it requires 2.1V it wont boot in most PC's unless you raise the voltages before putting it in. If that ram booted at 800MHz, it would be stable, allowing you to manually set it to 1066/1110 later.
  24. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    He has 1333 RAM, it has SPD tables for up to 1333, that is why you see an entry for 686 in the SPD tables. The max bandwidth is set lower for compatibility with boards that wont boot at higher than 533 without adjustments.

    Correct. As long as it has a SPD or EPP entry for the higher speeds, it doesn't matter what is in the Max Bandwidth field.
    Crunching for Team TPU More than 25k PPD

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