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AMD Delivers First Stream Processor with Double Precision Floating Point Technology

Discussion in 'News' started by malware, Nov 8, 2007.

  1. malware New Member

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    Advanced Micro Devices today announced the AMD FireStream 9170 Stream Processor and an accompanying Software Development Kit (SDK) designed to harness the massive parallel processing power of the graphics processing unit (GPU). AMD leveraged its unique collective expertise in both GPUs and CPUs to deliver the first integrated hardware and software development solution that meets the needs of the demanding high-performance computing (HPC) market. AMD plans to deliver the FireStream 9170 and supporting SDK to market in the first quarter of 2008. With this launch AMD expects to achieve another important milestone on the path to Accelerated Computing by delivering the first in a series of next-generation heterogeneous compute architectures.

    “With a broad range of customer engagements underway, notably customers in the oil and gas, financial and engineering analysis industries, AMD is delivering on its vision of Accelerated Computing with breakthrough benefits for our enterprise customers,” said Rick Bergman, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Graphics Products, AMD. “Leveraging the immense graphics processing capabilities acquired from ATI and the HPC domain expertise of AMD, we are developing strong relationships with system vendors and the supporting technology eco-system to deliver processing innovation through an open platforms approach.”

    AMD FireStream 9170
    The AMD FireStream 9170 will be the world’s first Stream GPU with double-precision floating point technology tailored for scientific and engineering calculations. Competitively priced at an MSRP of $1999 USD, it features up to 500 GFLOPS of compute power, rivalling many of today’s supercomputers, and providing dramatic acceleration for critical algorithms. This second generation Stream Processor is built with 55 nm process technology and consumes less than 150 watts of power – delivering an exceptional performance per watt. In addition, the reduced heat dissipation allows it to function in dense design configurations. The FireStream 9170 is a single card solution with two GB of onboard GDDR3 memory to compute large datasets without CPU traffic. The asynchronous direct memory access (DMA) ensures data can flow freely without interrupting the stream processor or CPU.

    “GPUs have long been known for their immense parallel processing performance but many challenges still remain in driving widespread customer adoption for general purpose compute,” said Jon Peddie, President, Jon Peddie Research. “Leveraging its unique capabilities in high-performance CPU and GPU technologies, AMD is well positioned to drive an integrated hardware and software proposition that can deliver the best of both processing worlds to its HPC customers.”

    AMD FireStream SDK
    The AMD FireStream SDK is designed to deliver the tools developers need to create and optimize applications on AMD Stream processors. Built using an open platforms approach, the AMD FireStream SDK allows developers to access key Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and specifications, enabling performance tuning at the lowest level and development of third party tools. Building on AMD’s Close to the Metal (CTM) interface introduced in 2006, the Compute Abstraction Layer (CAL) provides low-level access to the GPU for development and performance tuning along with forward compatibility to future GPUs. For high-level development, AMD is announcing Brook+, a tool providing C extensions for stream computing based on the Brook project from Stanford University. In addition, AMD also plans to support the AMD Core Math Library (ACML) to provide GPU-accelerated math functions, and the COBRA video library accelerates video transcode. Also available are third-party tools from top industry partners including RapidMind and Microsoft.

    In addition, AMD is now a charter participant in HP’s new HPC Accelerator Program, offering HP customers best practices and guidance for these technologies, and ensuring that accelerator hardware and software is qualified for HP servers running HPC applications.

    “As innovative new HPC technologies like Stream Computing emerge, it is imperative we work with our partners to ensure an open systems approach to enable new levels of processing efficiency and performance,” said Winston Prather, vice president and general manager of HPC at HP. “As part of HP’s new HPC Accelerator program, we’re working closely with AMD and our customers to deliver an optimal mix of hardware innovation and open, collaborative development environments to ensure delivery of best-in-class HPC platforms.”

    Source: Forbes
     
  2. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi New Member

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    can anyone tell me what this means for teh average d00d with a pc?
     
  3. nflesher87

    nflesher87 Staff

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    not much of anything IRA lol
     
  4. Ripper3

    Ripper3 New Member

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    Not for the moment anyhow, but this might lead to many improvements in stream processing, and possibly making stream processors come to desktops. Will still take an awful lot of time, but then we already have GPUs that are extremely powerful, inside our PCs (although most have only bothered using it for folding).

    This is mighty cool, and the price, and low power requirements of it, are brilliant. Running one in each node, in a ten node machine, that would be brilliant. That would certainly makefor one bloody powerful machine, without costing anywhere near as much as a full blown super computer.
     
  5. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, for one thing, if this technology came down in price enought that it could be incorporated into standard desktops and notebooks, it could exponetially increase the rigs ability to handle complex physics and AI simulations.
     
  6. newconroer

    newconroer

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    Didn't Ageia say something like that too Kerij :)


    ...so this is where AMD has been putting it's resources.

    Ok we found a good excuse for the Phenom's, carry on.
     
  7. erocker

    erocker Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This is the same thing as those Nvidia Tesla cards that came out a couple months ago.
     
  8. magibeg

    magibeg

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    I just want them to become awesome folding machines :p
     
  9. WarEagleAU

    WarEagleAU Bird of Prey

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    wait, doesnt Nvidia use STREAM PROCESSORS in their video cards, and AMD as well? Or is this something totally different from that architecture?
     
  10. panchoman

    panchoman Sold my stars!

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    amd built this uber powerful gpu that has a lot of uber power for things like folding. they have an sdk now so people can build programs to use this uber powerful gpu for regular computing, like a second cpu almost.
     
  11. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    Lol ... similar, but not the same. The Ageia card is a dedicated physics processor, where this looks to be programmable for whatever you need it for, therefore allowing super high end physics at the same time as complex AI calculations (if done in FP).

    The difference between this and the Tesla appears to be that this will do double precision floating point (extremely important in ultra-accurate calculations).

    My thought was not to add this to a system as an addition card, but if AMD could couple this functionality on-board mobos with their processors, it could take processing at the desktop level up a notch.

    So, AMD Phenom with thie mobo chipsets AND a programmable stream processor all pumping data for the sweetest gaming experience imagined.

    Of course, it would not work with nVidia cards :D
     

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