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AMD Launches the FirePro R5000 Remote Graphics Card for Deployment in Data Centers

Discussion in 'News' started by Cristian_25H, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. TheMailMan78

    TheMailMan78 Big Member

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    Don't bother. A college degree doesn't make you an artist man. The fact you are getting a degree in mechanical engineering means you don't have the dedication to follow through as a professional artist.

    That's not meant as an insult but doing this stuff isn't a matter of buying the software and BOOM your an artist. It takes YEARS of bloody knuckles and pain to "make it" in the industry. By making it I mean paying your bills on time. :laugh: STAY AWAY MAN. Their is a whole slew of people who are HIGHLY talented who will eat your lunch.

    Get good in math and forget anything in "design".
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  2. Prima.Vera

    Prima.Vera

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    Postal guy just smoked one I think. The d.d.d dude's mechanical design has nothing to do with art man. Is Mechanical Design, or 3D Design, meaning he will use 2D/3D Design software like AutoCAD, Catia, for parts designing or 3D modeling, or if he has some talent he can try for some Maya, 3D Studio Max, etc design where the real money are. But hard to get a job there to be honest.
    Anyways, for both types of design you still need a professional card, in case you want to render some big assemblies or very detailed parts/models without making a slide show on your screen. Talking from experience here...
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  3. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Then you're looking at the wrong card. This is not the card you want for CAD applications on a workstation, this is for servers.

    I see no mention of workstations. ;)

    The card doesn't make a good engineer. A good engineer makes the card.
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  4. Prima.Vera

    Prima.Vera

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    Right, this card competes with nVidia Tesla's if I'm not mistaken...
    He should try the W series from ATI, or some cheap old FX series from nVidia. No need monster card for practicing 3D software modeling
  5. Jizzler

    Jizzler

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    You are mistaken. AMD does have cards that compete with Teslas, but this is not one of them.

    Let's pretend that DDD gets a contract for a high-end engineering project. The company could supply him with a system, he could use his own, *or* they can provide him with a zero-client such as the Dell Wyse P45

    That last option is becoming popular because it mitigates certain risks and allows for better utilization of hardware (multiple cards can be installed in a system and targeted by VMs). DDD would just enter the IP of his assigned R5000 (or RG220) and start working.
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  6. jk47 New Member

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    Clear up some confusion....

    Ok, so there's alot of misinformation I'm seeing posted here. I hope I will clear some of it up.

    This card is the replacement for the AMD ATI RG220 (Tera1 Chipset). Both of these cards are targeted at remote graphics users, with the R5000 having the Tera2 chipset. Typically you would install this in a rackmount (or tower) workstation in a climate controlled environment. The "zero-client" would be on the user's desk. A good zero client for this card would be the Dell Wyse P45, expect to pay ~$1,000 each for the remote host card and the zero client.

    Think of a computer in a harsh environment...put the real computer in a clean room, put the zero client on the shop floor. This is how I make use of the pcoip host cards that I use.

    Some host cards allow a normal video card to be used and piped into the host card, others are a combined unit like this one.

    The second method to use this is with virtualization (vmware) on a server. You set up a bitchin server with multiple R5000's. Each virtual workstation gets mapped to one of these cards. The zero client connects to the card and it is basically the same as above. This is how the nvidia models work (no outputs, just a server offload card).

    Hopefully that clears this up. For more information google any of these: vmware view, pcoip, teradici, remote host card.
    Wrigleyvillain says thanks.

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