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Antiproton (antimatter) ring found around Earth

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by qubit, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    As these annihilate on contact with normal matter, I'm surprised that spacecraft and satellites flying through it don't get damaged or eventually destroyed.

    New Scientist
     
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  2. AphexDreamer

    AphexDreamer

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    Why aren't we noticing the annihilation? Is it some invisible battle?

    And I don't just mean with our bear eyes.

    Also

    "I find it very interesting to note that the Earth's magnetic field works a little bit like the magnetic traps that we are using in the lab"

    Shouldn't that be the other way around? Aren't their magnetic traps working a little like the Earth's Magnetic field...
     
  3. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    No, you wouldn't notice the annihilation, as these are individual particles, so the explosions are truly tiny. If one happened right in front of your nose you wouldn't see it. However, these are most powerful explosions possible - way more than a nuclear fission explosion, so it wouldn't take that much to make it visible. I reckon a 1000 or so particles should do it.

    Also, space is pretty empty, even near earth so collisions don't happen all that often.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  4. Drone

    Drone

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    Lol it ain't amount of energy that matters. It's how you use it. It's rather a good weapon.

    Anyway now I wonder where antineutrons are partying
     
  5. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    Make sure the shiny end of your tin foil hat is pointed outwards!!!!
     
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  6. twilyth Guest

    The diameter of a proton is 10^-15 meters. A nanometer is 10^-9 meters.

    The tracings (conductive pathways) on current cpu's are 32nm.

    So a proton is more than 1 million times smaller than a trace on a cpu die.

    What I think is interesting is that they're finding antiprotons and not anti-hydrogen. You would think that with all of the cosmic radiation we get these lonely antiprotons would have found a willing positron by now. IDK. Seems very strange.
     
  7. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    Dammit man, you had me excited that I was gonna get some sort of awesome super-villainy ring to wear that lets me destroy things at will.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. ViperXTR

    ViperXTR

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    Antimatter Ring:
    Level 25 required
    Causes utter destruction to 100ft radius (consumes 120 mana)
    additional bonuses;
    + 10 to Magic
    + 75 to Mana
    + 5 to Fire Damage
    -15 to HP
    Stackable
     
  9. twilyth Guest

  10. Drone

    Drone

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    10^-15 is called femto. This short range is the best for strong interaction - a force carried by little sexy gluons.

    Mmm the strangest thing ever is called Protonium

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn10302-antimatter-and-matter-combine-in-chemical-reaction.html
     
  11. twilyth Guest

    It's definitely strange that it lasted even that long. When I first saw the name I figured it would be something like anti-helium. Never would have guessed a hybrid. I guess I filtered out that part of quote. It just didn't register.

    I think I might subscribe. The cover story looks good. I always thought space-time was a bogus concept. It's just that it seems to work so damned well.

    And I liked the list of articles and news briefs. Plus, unlike SciAm, they don't try to charge you twice for a subscription. :shadedshu

    edit: oh, I think maybe the reason there was no anti-hydrogen has to do with the polarity of the field. Just a guess.
     
  12. Drone

    Drone

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    Anti-hydrogen is extremely rare in the universe. I remember an article it was published in May how scientists managed to trap anti-hydrogen for about 10 minutes.

    http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/arxiv/26709/

    ROFL I won't be surprised if anti-hydrogen falls up!
     
  13. twilyth Guest

    Yeah. Kinda highlights how little we actually know.

    What I was thinking was wrong anyway. Now that I look at the diagram more carefully I see it's a sphere that looks homogenous. So I guess my original question still stands.

    Ah, wait a minute. Anti-hydrogen would be electrically neutral. It would drift off and be annihilated.

    D'oh!
     
  14. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    Lord of the Anti-Matter Rings :laugh:
     

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