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Any real difference between i5 2500 and 2500K at stock specs?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by vnhill1981, Dec 28, 2011.

  1. vnhill1981

    vnhill1981

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    Bascially, I have a i2500 (non K version, no overclocking for me) on the way and am trying to pass the time "while waiting like a kid on Christmas Morning". I am upgrading from an Intel e2200 (along with a new motherboard) so I can't wait to see my new performance. Anyways, just wondering if both processors are ran at "stock settings" would the K version be the same as the Non-K version. For what it's worth, I picked up the Non-K version for $40 cheaper than the K version, which paid for the new Corsair Vengeance DDR3 1600 memory sticks I have coming. Again, I know that it really doesn't matter if there is any real difference, just trying to find something to do to pass the time.
     
  2. xenocide

    xenocide

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    The only benefit to the 2500k is that it can be overclocked, if you don't plan on overclocking, they are exactly the same.
     
    dude12564 says thanks.
  3. entropy13

    entropy13

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    No difference at stock. Do you have a P67 or Z68 board? You could still make the 3.7GHz Turbo a permanent overclock at least, and 3.8GHz is possible.
     
  4. vnhill1981

    vnhill1981

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    Bought a ASUS P8Z68-M PRO to go along with it. Will the stock heatsink be OK with the CPU at 3.7GHz? Figured it would have to be as this is a "stock auction" from Intel (if that makes sense).
     
  5. radrok

    radrok

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    Should be fine as long as you don't touch the voltage, will be borderline, but fine.
     
  6. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    Yup, no difference as everyone else has said. Don't worry about the auto overclock overheating it. Intel might ship it with a crap stock cooler, but you can be sure that it's good enough to cool the CPU under the most extreme conditions - as long as you run it completely at stock.
     
  7. entropy13

    entropy13

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    It would be OK but it would be very hot. I won't recommend doing it if you're using the stock heatsink.
     
  8. vnhill1981

    vnhill1981

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    Thanks for the responses. Not being so "computer literate", I plan on just installing everything and letting everything run stock. Hopefully all will go well as this is my first build/upgrade I've ever performed. Hence the reason I don't really want to get into overclocking. I just wanted to upgrade from my e2200 and I think there will be a night and day difference between that PSU and my new combination. I plan on using my Windows 7 upgrade disk to do a clean install, which only bites a little that I have to reload all of my programs, but luckily it's only about 15. I've already copied all of my "other files" to my USB flash drive and made 5 data disks with data that wouldn't fit on the flash drive. Should I make a set of back up disks, since I plan on doing a clean install. I figured I shouldn't have to. I read that I could help installation by already downloading the current drivers for the motherboard, but wouldn't they be erased during a clean install due to the HDD being formatted first. If this is the case it would probably be a waste of time. Thanks
     
  9. Jstn7477

    Jstn7477

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    The 2500 non-K actually has one advantage: all hardware virtualization features are present. Intel had the bright idea of removing some virtualization features from the K chips for whatever reason.

    Other than that, 2500 = 2500K at stock in terms of raw performance.
     
    Crunching for Team TPU More than 25k PPD
  10. tigger

    tigger I'm the only one

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    I'm using a 2400 and the stock heatsink, I also have the turbo thingy active. My temps are fine, tbh i don't even check them that much. It will be fine with the stock heatsink, you don't need to spend more money for another one imo.
     
  11. mlee49

    mlee49

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    Yeah, there's a K in the name. It stands for Kooler.

    TL;DR? Get the Kooler version






    seriously though, no difference.
     

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