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Any way to boost strength of onboard sound?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by hat, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    Having gotten rid of my Creative sound card and moved to my Realtek onboard sound, I can say the only thing I miss about having a sound card was the power of the signal it put out. I have to turn my speakers up more, and my headphones aren't as loud as they used to be. In fact, the power of the obnoard audio is so low that if I plug my headset into it, the volume of the internal recording mechanism, which records the audio being played at the moment (similar to What U Hear, it's called Stereo Mix) drops, but returns to normal volume when I plug my speakers in, which are powered externally. This has been confirmed by switching between my speakers and headset with my onboard sound and with the sound card.

    I'm looking for a way to boost the power of my onboard sound. Pencil modding a resister for less resistance? My board is the Biostar TF720 A2+, as listed in specs.
     
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  2. Techtu

    Techtu

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    I kind of have the same problem, since updating my motherboard the VIA sound chip is horrible compared to the (onboard) Realtek I had before.

    I too would be interested to know if there is such a way as pencil modding the board or any other tricks to improve on the sound :D
     
  3. AthlonX2

    AthlonX2 HyperVtX™

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    you could try to find some sort of sotware with an equalizer
     
  4. Kursah

    Kursah

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    Run digital to a stereo receiver, run bookshelf speakers and (after some research) have a plenty powerful headphone output. That'd get you way more power than a sound card...though it'd take up a ton more room. I had the same issue and eventually gave in and paid the money for my kickass Auzen X-Fi Forte, haven't looked back since...best soundcard I've ever owned. And you might try what Athlon X2 says, but expect clipping to happen sooner if you push the level too high....though it would be interesting to see an onboard sound "mod" to increase output power. Good luck!

    :toast:
     
  5. wahdangun

    wahdangun New Member

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    wow, i never heard of onboard sound moding but you can try use X-Fi software
     
  6. Graogrim New Member

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    Most onboard sound features built-in plug detection. The reduction in volume you hear is probably the sound hardware automatically adjusting to the specific electrical characteristics unique to headphones versus amps.

    That said, it's abnormal to experience volume issues with headphones on motherboard integrated sound. I use mobo-integrated Realtek audio with a headset for gaming, and I have to be careful with the volume because it can go all the way up to ear-shattering.

    One thing you might want to try is a switch between Microsoft's OS-bundled drivers and Realtek's own. It does open up a lot of options.
     
  7. CJCerny

    CJCerny

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    Software isn't going to do anything to help this problem. Different sound cards have different amounts of milliwatts on their outputs and software isn't going to change that no matter what you do. For headphones, the only solutions would be to get a headphone with a lower impedance or to use a dedicated headphone amp that allows you to control the amount of milliwatts being sent to the headphones. Headphone amps usually start around $30 or so on eBay.
     
  8. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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  9. wahdangun

    wahdangun New Member

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    wew $29 for headphone amplifier is not worth it, and if you onboard sound like crap it will just amplified it, you better save money and buy discrete sound car, like X-FI or second hand audigy
     
  10. FreedomEclipse

    FreedomEclipse ~Technological Technocrat~

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    Ive heard of people boosting their SNR on the built in audio chips by making their own I/O shield for it or attaching/gluing a small heatsink onto it.

    as for boosting audio - i dont think i can help with that one
     
  11. scaminatrix

    scaminatrix

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    I read something about this, putting a heatsink/s on the audio chip. CMIIW but I thought it made a significant difference?
     
  12. FreedomEclipse

    FreedomEclipse ~Technological Technocrat~

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    I honestly dont know - Ive not used built in realtek sound since 2002/03. Im just telling you what ive heard quite a bit about. if it works then great.
     
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